THE DAILY GLEANER COMMENTS (JANUARY to SEPTEMBER 2011)

These posts were made using the pseudonym Mistermel from January to September 2011.

Magnificient, Four Paths furniture maker strides despite losing use of leg

Published: Saturday | January 1, 20

Mistermel 1 hour ago

I wish Mr. Tulloch health and prosperity for 2011 and beyond. His story is that shows the resillency of the human spirit to overcom adversity. Don’t care what misfortune or adversity we are faced with they can be overcome. In a time when so many Jamaicans are experiencing misfortune and adversity either as crime victims or other circumstances Mr. Tulloch’s story should be an inspiration for them

Our time to shine

Published: Saturday | January 1, 2011

Mistermel 58 minutes ago 

My simple message is that the political leaders and any public service leader must lead by example. Anyone can recite words of encouragement and inspiration.The real question, however, when political leaders give their lofty New Year messages are: can they deliver, is it going to be the same old thing from the past year? Political leaders must lead by exampple, vision, courage, and with passion if they are serious about solving the serious social problems. They cannot continue to ignore and do nothing about gun crimes and corruption in the political system. These problem will not go away by ignoring them they will only get worse. We want to hear their voices all the time telling us what they are doing or how they plan tro deal with these problems. 

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EDITORIAL: Rewriting the script for 2011

Published: Saturday | January 1, 2011

Mistermel 1 hour ago 

During the past year I posted many comments that expressed the outrage I felt about the failures to deal with the problem of gun crimes and corruption in the political system. My motivation for doing this came from my strong love for the country of my birth and from my passion of speaking out against political leaders who by their actions and policies allow people to experience great suffering. I am not a supporter of the JLP or the PNP and I don’t care which party is in power. All I care about is for the party in power to work to make Jamaica a better place. We need a paradigm shift that will let people put God first, their family next, their country, and then their party. This should be the resolution that people make for the New Year. I hope the government will do much better in 2011 to fight crime and to eliminate the corruption in the political system. If they do then I won’t have to make these critical comments on them.

EDITORIAL – Mr Ellington’s New Year’s resolution

Published: Sunday | January 2, 2011

Mistermel 11 hours ago 

This editorial (especially the statement “New Year’s messages from public officials tend to be a sickly mix of sentimentality and platitudes”) would have been more applicable to the New Year messages delivered by the PM, the Leader of the Opposition, and the GG instead of Commissioner Ellington. These public leaders offered no specific prescriptions and no strategies to combat the troubling problem of crime. In contrast the Commissioner offered the following: 

1) Specific prescriptions for fighting crime as well as manages to set specific targets against which the Jamaica Constabulary Force and, by extension, himself, may be measured. 

2) Employing counter-gang strategies that disrupt defeat and degrade the capabilities of and deny organized crime the freedom to operate in a manner which they previously enjoyed.

There is no doubt that the Commissioner is working hard with little help from the public and the government to combat crime. Your editorial targeted the wrong public official and I am wondering if this is not an example of picking on a target that is not as popular and powerful as the political leaders. 

PUBLIC AFFAIRS – Jamaica’s language crisis

Published: Sunday | January 2, 2011

Mistermel 9 hours ago 

The language crisis that Mr. Thompson is addressing is indeed a problem that should not be ignored. While Mr. Thompson provides some insight into the problem I find that his arguments are somewhat contradictory and confusing. For example he laments his students not embracing English as one of the language they speak and states: “when they are asked on a questionnaire for language(s) spoken they list English as one, it ought to be the truth! All educated Jamaicans are bilingual. By that I do not mean English-Spanish or English-French, but Jamaican creole-English.” This is utter nonsense; English is the official language of Jamaicans. It is what they are taught in schools (I hope). All other form of oral communication like patois is pseudo languages. This is not to denigrate patois but it is not the official language and it is not the accepted language in that other social institutions recognize. 

Mr. Thompson claims that it is difficult to teach this Wikipedia generation yet he does not attribute patois as one of the difficulty in making it hard for students to write and speak English correctly. Also, if he is blaming information technology for the difficulty of teaching English what about cell phones. Most student even primary school children own a cell phone and spend a lot of time on this device. Then there is television which is another distraction for children. The point then is that technology has taken away a lot of time that students could have used in reading books and learning to write. 

The only thing that Mr. Thompson seems to recognize correctly is where states that many of the problems started at the primary level. His stating that all local universities should have an English as a Second Language (ESL) department and that ESL needs to be taught from the primary level is somewhat of an oxymoron. English is already our first language – maybe I am culturally ignorant and confused. 

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SHAPE UP! Church leaders demand positive action from politicians

Published: Sunday | January 2, 2011

Mistermel 11 hours ago 

The call for politicians to shape up by the church leaders is a good start. We have politicians who are slow in dealing with problems or simply cannot find solutions for one reason or the other. The only way to get these politicians to do something is to prod them or put pressure on them. While words alone might not be effective in getting them to react more dramatic methods might be helpful to get their attention. For example lawful and orderly protest demanding action usually work. Advertisement in the paper is also another effective method. 

THE POLITICAL AGENDA: THOSE TO WATCH

Published: Sunday | January 2, 2011

Mistermel 11 hours ago 

The assessment of these politicians reads like a amateurish horoscope that you normally see in a tabloid paper. I am not sure what benefit this assessment provides because I think most Jamaicans know these personalities. Nearly half or more of these politicians preside over garrison constituencies. It would have been more useful if you evaluated them using some more meaningful criteria like their association with garrison constituency politics and their effort toowards eliminating this troubling problem that is at the root of a lot of the social problems plaguing the country. 

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Glenn Smith 6 hours ago in reply to Mistermel 

Mmmm… People = votes, votes add up to power; garrisons carried more votes; hold the garrisons at all cost… 

Owen Ellington – Personality of the Year

Published: Thursday | January 6, 2011

Mistermel 3 hours ago 

When Mr. Elleington was selected to be commissioner I had my doubts that he was the right man for the job. My skepticism was probably due to the fact that he had rose through the ranks to such a hig position and did not seems to have the stellar credentials that some of his predecessors have. Commissioner Ellington has dispelled any doubt that I had then as he has demonstrated strong leadership and courage under difficult situations. First he is in charge of an organization that is perceived as corrupt and not wll trained. Then he is confronted with the worst crime problem in the history of country. On top of all of this he gets very little support from the government. Commissioner Elleington deserves this recognition and I offer my sincere congratulations to him and hope he will continue the good work for the people of Jamaica. 

noshel 5 hours ago 

The personality of the year should be no other than MR GREG CHRISTIE!

Mistermel 3 hours ago in reply to noshel 

Mr. Christie has fought a onre man battle against the forces of corruption. Unlike Commissioner Ellington he does not have a force to protect him and effectively execute his job. For his bravery and courage in fighting corruption I would say that it would not have been a difficult choice to make him share the recognition with Commissioner Ellington. Also, I would not have any problem with Mr. Christie getting this award because he too desreves it. 

‘Don’t ease up’ – Business heads wary of war on crime losing steam

Published: Thursday | January 6, 2011

Mistermel 9 hours ago 

The issue of corruption in the political system remains a serious one and I totally agree with Jamaica Chamber of Commerce (JCC), that the government has not shown any interest or initiative in wanting to dismantle the garrison constituencies and to implement new laws that would make it a crime for an MP to have any kind of relationship with a don or person who has a criminal background. This is a problem that must be addressed not only to restore the integrity of the political system but also to help fight crime and to move the country forward. This problem should be a top priority for the government. I hope the Commission of Enquiry will strongly recommend that garrison constituencies be dismantled and that MPs be held accountable for their association with dons or people with criminal inclinations. 

Another don killed – Residents claim he was unarmed and innocent

Published: Saturday | January 8, 2011

Mistermel 5 hours ago 

With all the controversy and confusion that the angry residents are trying to create in the killing of Don Pugu one thing is clear and it is this: don’t expect any MP or high ranking politician to be attending his funeral. Prior to Dudusgate these politicians would have no shame in paying their respect to their funeral. I dare any of them to attend the funeral of Pugu. 

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‘Impotent’ governments

Published: Saturday | January 8, 2011

Mistermel 5 hours ago 

These are the kind of problems you get from failed leadership. Laws and regulations are ignored with impunity and consequently chaos, disorder, and indiscipline takes over. We see thie in almos every facet of public life today. Noise ordinance is not obeyed, public transportation ignores safety rules, and public agencies do not perform their duties. the

 conclusion is that with poor leadership the expectations and standards are non-existent or too low. 

EDITORIAL – Transparency in our choice of energy

Published: Monday | January 10, 2011

Mistermel 5 hours ago  

There are a lot more things he needs to get right. It is time that jamaicans get good political leadership that will show a committment to solving the social problems crippling the country. 

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Jamaica Constabulary Force disciplines almost 400 cops in 2010

Published: Monday | January 10, 2011

The failure to effectively fight crime is due primarily to failed political leadership. You cannot fight crime without having the right measures in place. You have to have laws that will make it difficult for criminals to perpetrate their crimes. There are a number of laws that the govt. could implement that would reduce crime. Unfortunately, the govt. appears impotent in their ability to do anything when it comes to crime.

Golding not satisfied

Published: Monday | January 10, 2011

Mistermel 6 hours ago 

Prime Minister Bruce Golding says he is not satisfied Jamaica has enough attractions to keep visitors excitingly engaged. Well Mr. Golding I have news for you. If you want to be satisfied then get rid of political corruption and violent gun crimes. It is as simple as that.

4 people liked this

Mistermel 6 hours ago 

I notice that some of the regular posters including myself are not showing up in the Comments section of news they normally comment. Is this a new policy of the Glener in blocking comments that are critical of the government? 

Charged on hospital bed

Published: Tuesday | January 11, 2011

Mistermel 3 hours ago 

Since cell phones came into use more motorists have been using this device while driving. This unsafe practice has led to accidents that could have been avoided if they were not being used. I don’t know if this young lady was using a cell phone or what caused this unfortunate accident. If the investigation reveals that she was using a cellphone then would be wise to ban the use of this device while driving. And even if she was not using a cell phone it’s use while driving needs to be a traffic violation. 

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Murder rate continues to decrease

Published: Tuesday | January 11, 2011

Mistermel 3 hours ago 

While this is a good trend no one should take comfort in believing this is a permanent trend. It is only a lull that is the result of gang leaders being in disarray as a result of stepped up pressure to hunt them down. Violent crime in Jamaica will not be permanently reduced without permanent measures that exact severe punishment . There are still too many gangs too many gun men and too much corruption. All these things must be eliminated before anyone can feel safe and assured that measures are in in place to deter these violent crime. 

‘Hit the brakes’

Published: Thursday | January 13, 2011

Mistermel 12 hours ago 

The Jamaica Observer just reported that the LNG report is not for public consumption. What is so confidential in this report that the govt. is afraid of making it public? Working paper or not energy is a public matter and the public has the right to know what the govt. intentions are. For a govt. that has been linked to corruption via the Duuds debacle you woudl expect them to show some transparency in their plan and policies. Now is not the time for secrets. 

Mistermel 13 hours ago 

What ever happened to Mr. Robertson case. It has been several months now since it was first reported that the police was investigating him for orderin a hit. has the investigation stalled because of political pressure? Just curious. And if I may add, from the look of his picture he seems to be a very troubled man. 

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PM slams media foot dragging on ethics

Published: Thursday | January 13, 2011

Mistermel 13 hours ago 

Whenever I read the comments of Mr. Golding I don’t know if I should cry or laugh. His comments are so antithetical to what he should be doing as a leader. He tries so hard to hold others accountable for things that he thinks need to be done. And there is the other habit of blaming others for mistakes (passing the buck). Mr. Golding certainly likes to pass the buck when he finds himself in sticky situations. Classic examples are when he said that his own party for the hiring of the Manatt, Phelps, and Phillips law firm to get the Dudus extradition order squashed and when it was JDFs decision to relocate Up Park Camp. Then in yesterday news he wants more attraction for tourists and today he is slamming the media for dragging their feet on ethics. Mr. Golding’s own self-inflicted political wound from the Dudus debacle has left him vulnerable and ineffective as a leader. Ineffective because Jamaicans are still waiting to see him fix the very problem that got him in trouble – the nexus of garrison politics that has corrupted the political system. Jamaicans want more from him and want him to stop dragging his feet on implementing measures to restore integrity in the political system (this means dismantling garrison politics and the association of politicians with dons).

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Denbigh, 50 years after

Published: Thursday | January 13, 2011 3 Comments and 0 Reactions 

Lance Neita, Contributor

Mistermel 13 hours ago 

Thanks for this article Lance. I too have fond memories of my childhood visits to the annual Denbigh Agricultural Show. As I recall it was an event that children and adults look forward to. The Denbigh show then was a multi-faceted one that showcased agricultural products, provided entertainment, and like you said see dignitaries. Denbigh is indeed a national treasure and I hope it will be continued to be operated as such. 

EDITORIAL – No time for excuses on libel reform

Published: Friday | January 14, 2011

Mistermel 15 hours ago 

Is it conceivable that the government wants to overhaul the defamation laws to make it a little more restrictive for people to criticize them? With the political system contaminated with corruption and so much political scandals I 

can see where they are concerned about criticisms. It is also possible that they could use revised libel and defamation laws to muzzle the press thus eroding freedom of the press. The “Comments”section following most articles is perhaps one area of the press that the government would probably like to see shut-down.

If any there are any laws that need overhauling or to be implemented it is that of severing the nexus between politicians and dons (or anyone who is engaged with criminal or corrupt activities). 

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Sad end for brothers

Published: Monday | January 17, 2011 9 Comments and 0 Reactions 

Patrina Pink, Gleaner Writer

Mistermel 7 hours ago 

My heart breaks when I read about these kinds of tragedies. They are preventable and more needs to be done to protect children and even adults from these safety hazards. There needs to be some process where people have to have a permit that requires some kind of a barrier and caution signs to warn people about the danger. This barrier could be a rope around the dangerous area with caution signs. The authorities responsible for public health and safety need to take these kinds hazards seriously and implement policies to educate and protect vulnerable or unsuspecting people of the hazards. 

My condolences go out to the family and friends of these two kids and I hope that from this tragedy something good will come out of it (i.e., measures to help prevent children from losing their life to these types of hazards).

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‘Baby Doc’ back in Haiti

Published: Monday | January 17, 2011

Mistermel 7 hours ago 

Baby Doc return to Haiti is an insult and disgrace. This man and his father oppressed the poor people of Haiti for decades and in so doing kept them in a state of poverty. Only the devil could have done to Haiti what the Duvaliers did to that country. And now that Haiti is desperately in need of help as a result of the earthquake this evil man has chosen to return. The only time he should have been allowed to return is when he is dead. He claims he has not returned as a presidential candidate. We will soon see the real purpose of his return to Haiti and we will soon learn why the powers to be made his return possible. 

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State must pay!

Published: Tuesday | January 18, 2011

Mistermel 12 hours ago 

It is unfortunate that it takes a tragedy such as the drowning of the two brothers in a pit to make people realize that something needs to be done. And it is unfortunate especially if the tragedy involves those that are more vulnerable like children and elderly people. Society needs to be more cognizant and more proactive in identifying hazardous situations to the authorities and I assume there is some government agency or ministerial office that deals with matters of public health and safety. If there is such an office or agency they need to educate people to develop a situational awareness of hazardous situations and to report these hazards to them immediately. The safety of children should be a priority for the government, for parents, for the community they live in, and for everyone. 

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Fleming airport sign vandalised

Published: Tuesday | January 18, 2011 (Not published)

While I understand the controversy that has emerged from the airport being named after Ian Fleming I think it is unfortunate that the sign was vandalized. There are always better ways to protest than to vandalize property or cause 

harm. Personally I would have liked if this airport was named after one of Jamaica’s national hero like Marcus Garvey. It is ironic that this national hero Marcus Garvey said that we should honor people of our own race rather than of other race. Marcus Garvey was a visionary leader and many of the things he talked or wrote about are still relevant in today. It is also ironic that although Marcus Garvey was very political the only people who seem to revere him are the musicians in their reggae songs. Marcus Garvey International Airport not only has a better ring than Ian Fleming International Airport it is also relevant for three reasons: he is a national hero, he was born in St. Ann (parish adjacent to St. Mary), and he has international name recognition (maybe not to white people). There are other ways Ian Fleming could be honored such as naming a street after him or erecting a statue.

EDITORIAL – There’s a hole in the Sandals Whitehouse deal

Published: Tuesday | January 18, 2011

Mistermel 11 hours ago 

The only comment I wish to make here with respect to the sale of Sandals whitehouse is that I don’t recall any previous administration (PNP or JLP) that had this penchant of selling off Jamaica’s assets. since taking office Mr. Golding has presided over the sale of sugar estates to the Chinese, the sale of Air jamaica to Trinidad, and I believe that he wanted to sell the railway. he was also pushing for the relocation of the Jamaica Defence Force (Up Ppark Camp) and here I can only guess that he was going to sell this off to the highest bidder. Maybe there are good reasons for him wanting to dispose of this assets. From my perspective I am not aware of any at this time. 

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Not Published

Most governments do not have the expertise to make policy decisions on issues that fall under their governance. So it is a testimony to the democratic process when the government uses people who have some expertise in this case tourism and business. My only concern (and it is a small concern) is that five of the six members of this advisory group are connected to the hotel business. It probably would have been better to have a more diversified group that include people with a related background in the development of attractions or entertainment that could be applied to tourism.

Major arms bust in MoBay

Published: Wednesday | January 19, 2011

Mistermel 10 hours ago 

In Greek mythology each time Hercules cut off the head of the hydra another head grows back. This is the situation with the police finding these guns and ammunition. How many times do we read about these busts in the papers? I believe the government needs to implement tough gun laws that will provide the following punishments:

1) Make people who have these weapons or smuggle them serve a life sentence if convicted. 

2) Impound their assets including the property that the guns or ammunitions are found on.

3) In lieu of life sentence give a reduced sentence if those apprehended provide information that leads to the recovery of more guns or ammunitions.

4) An automatic death sentence for anyone using a gun to commit a crime involving the murder of a person

5) A sentence of 20-40 years for anyone harboring a criminal or person who is found with a gun. 

I believe that if the above laws are put in place we would see a dramatic drop in gun crime. It is full time that the government sends a strong message that gun crimes can no longer be tolerated. They can do this by implementing the above laws.

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Robertson draws first blood in court

Published: Wednesday | January 19, 2011

Mistermel 10 hours ago 

This doesn’t make sense to me . Why was this lawsuit filed in a Florida court that has no jurisdiction over an alleged crime that occurred in Jamaica? Is the attorney who filed the lawsuit. The arguments that the attorney David Rowe are using simply does not make sense ( Rowe said the judge has given Johnson 15 days to refile the claim and establish that Florida has jurisdiction over the case.

“Johnson intends to refile immediately because his former residence is Florida and his children reside there … ,”).  

Who hired Manatt?

Published: Friday | January 21, 2011

Mistermel 13 hours ago 

I think most people already know who hired Manatt, Phelps, and Phillips (MPP)law firm. Whether its the JLP or government the differences are related to private vs public liability. Regardless of which entity did the hiring that decision could only come from the blessing of the PM. He is the head of the government and his party the JLP forms the government. It is inconceivable that the JLP could have hired the lawfirm in without the Foreign Ministry and the PM not being aware of it and approving it. The bigger question then is not who hired the lawfirm but what should be the punishment for the hiring of the MPP lawfirm? This is a better speculative question. 

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joy 11 hours ago in reply to Mistermel 

From whose account the bills were paid . You have to address that too. The best punishment for these people in this imbriglio is to RESIGN. 

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Adelroy36 4 hours ago in reply to Mistermel 

I did not know that is illegal to hire a lawyer or a law firm these days .TI. does not matter on whose behalf . Remember every person is innocent until proven guilty in a court of LAW, !!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!. 

Use the private sector to better Jamaica, says business leader

Published: Friday | January 21, 2011

Mistermel 13 hours ago 

These business leaders seem to have tunnel vision as the only thing they focus on is business development. Why can’t these business leaders recognize that the serious problems of trickle down corruption (from the government to other sectors of the society) and unprecedented gun crimes are not conducive to the development of the economy? Are they afraid to address these problems because they think it will impact business? The sooner everyone (including the political leaders) recognizes that Jamiaca cannot move forward under the existing social disorder then there will be hope for fixing these problems and moving forward. 

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MAYHEM!

Published: Saturday | January 22, 2011

Mistermel 12 hours ago 

It is full time the dead beat government disarm the criminal thugs. The government is responsible for implement measures for the protection and safety of the public and so far they have failed miserably in performing their responsibility. If these government persons under whose portfolio public safety falls were in corporate companies  they would have been fired long ago for incompetence. There is a way to fire them and it is to vote them out of office when election time comes around. We know what their record is and so they will not be able to fool anyone this time.

Talking about the failure of the government to protect its citizens from barbaric criminal gunmen why doesn’t the Jamaica for Justice (JFJ). If JFJ is for justice then they should be calling out the government on this. I guess duppy know who fe frighten.

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No retreat! Police to pursue criminals

Published: Saturday | January 22, 2011

Mistermel 12 hours ago 

Commissioner Ellington is doing his level best without little or no support from the government. It is time that the government step-up and support the Commissioner in fighting the criminal thugs. We need the PM to send a clear message to gunmen that their criminal behavior will no longer be tolerated. He can do this by implementing tough laws. All Jamaicans should be sick and tired of gunmen killing innocent people with impunity. Regardless of what anyone says it is only through severe punishment like life sentence, the death penalty, seizing of property that gun crimes will be reduced. Why because there is a sub-culture of hardcore criminals that prey on the innocent and vulnerably at will. If the PM thinks that by simply ignoring these violent gun crimes it will go away he needs to get his head out of the sand. 

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EDITORIAL – Be bold on investment and jobs, Mr Golding

Published: Monday | January 24, 2011

Mistermel 11 hours ago 

First and foremost the Prime Minister needs to be bold in fighting crime and corruption. The political system must be purged of the corruption that has impacted the ability of the government to perform in an effective manner. Then there is the problem of barbarian gunmen who kill anywhere and anytime they chose to. These are the problems that need urgent attention. 

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Mistermel 11 hours ago 

First and foremost the Prime Minister needs to be bold in fighting crime and corruption. The political system must be purged of the corruption that has impacted the ability of the government to perform in an effective manner. Then there is the problem of barbarian gunmen who kill anywhere and anytime they chose to. These are the problems that need urgent attention. 

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EDITORIAL – PNP leader offering more fluff than fixes

Published: Wednesday | January 26, 2011

Mistermel 13 hours ago 

The Opposition Party (PNP) has the same leadership problem as the government (JLP). Neither entity has demonstrated the type of political leadership that is necessary to fix the growing problems affecting the country and to put the country on a path to good economic development. Neither entity has shown any initiative to fix serious problems like the corruption of the political system (a problem they have created); escalating gun violence; and high unemployment. Good leaders are not afraid to tackle serious problems and when their country faces serious problems they can motivate and inspire people to do better. Not once have I heard the PNP or JLP leadership make a strong declaration of fixing the two serious problems that are damaging the country: gun crimes and the corruption of the political system. 

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Stanley 9 hours ago in reply to Mistermel 

Dream on Mistermel. Do you really think those ‘wanga gut’ politicians have the moral and ethical courage  to ‘fix’ the status quo that rewards their mediocrity? The new generation of young politicians waiting in the wings seem even more stupid than their greedy, complacent, myopic mentors. “The people get the government they deserve.” In our democracy, depravity has the numbers on its side. However, we must remain hopeful, even if not optimistic. 

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PNP has progessive agenda – Pickersgill

Published: Wednesday | January 26, 2011

Mistermel 13 hours ago 

OK Mr. Pickersgill since you think your party is ready to run the country again tell us how your party will deal with the political corruption in the political system. Basically, this means what measures you would put in place to dismantle the garrison constituencies and restore trust and integrity in the political system. And how would your party deal with the related problem of violent gun crimes involving gunmen killing anyone, anytime, and anywhere with impunity? And if your party is ready to lead the country what would you do differently that the government is not doing to change the economic situation of the country? If you and your party can provide reasonable answers to these questions then yes I would say you are ready. Saying that you are ready does not make you ready. You have to provide plan or refer to positive things your party has done while being the Opposition Party. None of this is evident right now so stop playing. Jamaica can no longer afford a political party saying “ready or not here I come.” 

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‘Crack the whip’ – Blair urges speaker to discipline unruly parliamentarians

Published: Thursday | January 27, 2011

Mistermel 9 hours ago 

I agree with Bishop Blair we cannot expect discipline in society with elected officials themselves demonstrate indiscipline behavior in parliament. If their behavior is bad in parliament then you can imagine what it is like when they are not in parliament. Parliamentarians should exemplified dignity and good decorum at all times. 

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Christie irks Vaz

Published: Thursday | January 27, 2011

Mistermel 9 hours ago 

Mr. Christie is doing an excellent job. Mr. Vaz is simply attempting to undermine his effort by making comments that have no justification. When we have a corrupt political that is manifested in the many scandals and the Dudus debacle I think most people can understand why Mr. Christie effort to rein in these corrupt politicians might seems demanding or excessive. 

7 people liked this. 

The man with the golden gun

Published: Thursday | January 27, 2011

Mistermel 9 hours ago 

A Jamaican who I believe the airport should have been named after is Marcus Garvey. The visionary Pan-African leader and national hero inspired thousands of black people in America, Africa, and other places with his philosophy of self-determination, independence, and pride. Marcus Garvey also believed that black people should honor people of their own race first. Perhaps there are some Jamaicans who are still psychologically influenced by the colonial system so that they cannot do what Marcus Garvey saw was necessary. Bob Marley said in one of his song that we must emancipate ourselves from mental slavery. Maybe if the people responsible for the naming of the airport were emancipated from mental slavery they would have honored one of their own as Marcus Garvey believed and practiced. Oh, by the way travelers or tourists don’t visit a country because of the name of the airport. So the argument that the Ian Fleming name has international recognition is pointless. 

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‘Fire Key’ set free

Published: Friday | January 28, 2011

Mistermel 2 hours ago 

I am not going to overact to this unfortunate mistake by the police. This kind of thing happens from time to time. Believe it or not even in countries like USA, Britain, and Canada where police are much more advanced in terms of academic qualifications and training they make similar mistakes from time to time. Policing is a stressful job and you can imagine the toll it takes on the Jamaican cop who is besieged by hardcore gunmen who have no qualms in killing them. If the cop(s) responsible for the mistake that set this man free was/were not following procedures then corrective action must be implemented to ensure that this does not occur again. 

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EDITORIAL – Cut the link between crime and politics

Published: Friday | January 28, 2011

Mistermel 2 hours ago 

Amen…I have been posting comments for quite a while for the government to implement a law to impeach members of parliament who are linked with dons. In essence this law would allow impeachment process for a politician who is proven to use a don or anyone with a criminal background to engage in political activities. This law would help to dismantle the garrison constituencies and restore trust and integrity to the political system. Purging the corruption of the political system should be a top priority because no one can trust corrupt politicians. The loss of trust pollutes the economic environment and make it difficult for economic growth. 

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Witter laments human-rights abuse

Published: Monday | January 31, 2011

Mistermel 12 hours ago 

It appears that there is lack of understanding of what human rights abuse really is. Generally, the term human rights abuse applies to when innocent people are oppressed or denied basic civil rights by a despotic government. This government usually runs a police state or use military or para military force to implement the abuse. This is not what is happening in Jamaica. The majority of people who groups like Jamaica for Justice and Mr. Witter are claiming to be human rights abuse is misleading. The fact of the matter is that there is a large criminal population of gunmen who are daring, barbaric, and who have no fear of engaging the police in a violent confrontation. Compounding this is that a large sector of the society is undisciplined and anti-police. Consequently, when the police kills these criminals we hear cries of police bruta;lity and human rights abuse. When barbaric gunmen are killed by the police during the performance of their duties it is not human rights abuse. We need to understand that when the police go after criminals who are not prepared to surrender they are going to be killed by the police (this is not extar judicial killing) and there is going to be property damage. 

Bruce Golding to testify at ‘Dudus’ enquiry next week

2011-01-31 12:18:29 |

I have a hard time understanding the mentality of people who see the commision of enquiry as a waste of time. You cannot have an eggregious problem like the Dudus debacle caused when it compromised the integrity of the government and and have no inveswtigation. While it is true that the inquiry might not yield the results everyone would like to see it is an essential part of the democratic process. Those who see it as a waste of time exemplifies the attitude of low expectations and slackness of not having any standards. The lack of these things by so many p0eople is why politicians take advantage of them and why there is so much crime and corruption.

Clarendon carnage

Published: Friday | February 4, 2011

Mistermel 5 hours ago 

Road safety is one of the many serious problems that are taken for granted by everyone and not given the kind of attention it deserves. Too many people are being killed by the reckless and irresponsible drivers who have no sense or regards for the lives of anyone. The sad thing about this is that many passengers encourage these drivers to speed and take risks which endanger their lives and other innocent people using the highways. Like other problems like gun crimes the prevalence of these gruesome traffic accidents occur because of these factors: lack of adequate traffic laws or the lack of enforcement of current laws; lack of leadership in implementing proper road safety measures; and people who are mentally unfit to be behind the wheel of an automobile. These accidents scenes should be videotaped and shown to all new drivers who are issued with a drivers license and holders of drivers license when they get their licensed renewed. Also, drivers who are charged with reckless driving should get their licenses suspended and be required to see these videos as a condition of getting their licenses back. 

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No war of words, says Vaz

Published: Friday | February 4, 2011

Mistermel 5 hours ago 

Mr. Vaz is always making comments only to back pedal when his comments draw strong criticisms. As minister of Information in the PM’s office he should demonstrate the ability to provide trust, assurance, and credibility. You can’t demonstrate these things when you are making comments that are confusing, controversial, or undermine the efforts of those like Mr. Christie who is trying to keep public officials honest. 

Tivoli not impressed

Published: Thursday | February 10, 2011

Mistermel 12 hours ago 

What is the purpose of interviewing Tivoli residents about the Commission of Enquiry? And who cares if they are impressed or not. We all know waht their reaction is going to be regarding any matter related to Dudus their God. These are the people who have allowed the political system with its don to exploit them for political purposes and have nothing to show for it. It would have been better they were interviewed to find out what they would like the government to do to make their life better. 

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Sista Truth 10 hours ago in reply to Mistermel 

Mistermel with that insignificant brain of yours I realize that it does not occur to you that Tivoli residents are Jamaican citizens too. I am a proud Tivoli resident and have never or will ever refer to Dudus as my God. There are many communities who choose one political affiliation over the other so why are you only criticizing my community. Have you ever entered my community or try to have a conversation with any member from my community the ones you show such disdain for? I don’t think so, but still yet you know what we have or don’t have. We maybe from a lower socio-economic background but mark my words most of us are more educated than you people who turn there noises and regards us as garbage. I would like the government to make changes so employers stop judging people from the inner city when they see applications on their desk and give ghetto youths more opportunity to learn a skill because you would be so fascinated to see how talented we are. Have a blessed day. 

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52donbarn52 11 hours ago in reply to Mistermel 

You are so blinded by your political leanings that you cant see past your nose.The people of Tivoli are jamaicans and are paying taxes just like everybody else.They also have opinions and voices.Dons and exploitation are all over jamaica.Are they the result of Tivoli people?Do you know what tivoli people have? Do you even know what the inside of tivoli look like? There is no area in jamaica that has only criminals.Everywhere has its good and bad. These people have a right to be heard.There is a line in the poem DESIDERATA that speaks about people like you . 

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PM’s statement takes another hit at Manatt

2011-02-15 12:39:59 | with audio | (9 Comments) 

Guest

This is why it was important to have this Commission of Enquiry so that we could get the full truth of this disgraceful Dudus mess. It was clear that even after the PM made his public apology that the rest of the story was not being told. Now that we have this COE people are under pressure to defend their reputation and honesty. Based on what is coming out of the COE I do not see how Mr. Golding can be deemed fit to lead the country.

Buju’s dreadlocks in peril

Published: Friday | February 25, 2011

Mistermel 13 hours ago 

This obsession of the media to report on trivial matter related to celibrities is is almost cult-like. It is as if they think this is really something important to know about the celibrity. What is so special about Buju’s dreadlocks …you guys have been treating him like he is a God. Next thing the media is going to do is to report that he is a national hero or is deserving of such honor. 

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Vaz clarifies comments at post-Cabinet press briefing

Published: Saturday | February 26, 2011

Mistermel 12 hours ago 

Mr. Vaz is a real liability for the government as he seems to not have the communication skills that is required for the position disiminating information on government policies or whatever information they want to get out. It seems like everytime he opens his mouth he says something that he later has to go back and clarify or apologize. Now he is telling us that at time he give his personal opinion. Is this what the government is paying him to do? In his testimony to the COE did he give his personal opinion? Now we know why Jamaica is having a hard time getting things done…we have people like Mr. Vaz who are in the wrong position. 

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‘Alarming!’

Published: Saturday | February 26, 2011

Mistermel 12 hours ago 

Is it possible that some of these accidents might be attributable to cops driving under the influence of drugs or alcohol? I do not ask this question lightly because given the violent crime wave and the number of police killed in the line of duty this job has to be the most hazardous job. It is well known that when people are stressed (as believe these cops are) they turn to alcohol and drugs to help them deal with their stressful situation. 

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cr 9 hours ago in reply to Mistermel 

Policing is indeed the most stressing job and is followed closely by teachers. Anyone else agrees? 

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Manatt shuns witness box

Published: Wednesday | March 2, 2011

Mistermel 14 hours ago 

Manatt, Phelps & Phillips seems to hold the key to the COE. Failure to get any information to confirm who contacted and retained them will probably make it difficult for the COE to hold anyone responsible. Mr. Knight’s suggestion that the government release the law firm from its attorney-client privilege would probably help. At this stage I hardly believe the government is inclined to do this. After all this would be like driving a nail in their coffin. The analogy I see here is that of the prosecutor trying to find an alleged murderer guilty without having a body and therefore has to rely on circumstantial evidence. No MPP means the COE will have to rely on circumstantial evidence. 

Jamaican Revolution

Published: Wednesday | March 2, 2011

Din Duggan

Mistermel 13 hours ago 

There is no doubt that profound changes are needed in every aspect of Jamaican life. Mr. Duggan cited some areas where he thinks require a revolution. However, he was not specific as to what kind of revolution was required and seems to imply that revolution should be against policies. What I believe is really need is a cultural revolution that will change the mindset or psyche of people. Currently we have a culture that is steeped in crime, corruption and indiscipline. No society can make progress when these types of problems permeate or affect the entire society. 

A cultural revolution to change people’s behavior and attitude to one that doesn’t accept crime, corruption and indiscipline is the only way to solve Jamaica’s social problem. This revolution must start in the class room and then extend out into the society through special education programs. Our institutions must set standards and expectations to help achieve this cultural revolution. We must remove all negative influences that originate from music, drugs, etc. that corrupt the minds of the youth. We must demand better from those in position of authority and hold them responsible for their failures and unethical behavior.

Yes we need a revolution in Jamaica right now.

Khani James 12 hours ago in reply to Mistermel 

The revolution that is need in Jamaica must start in the classroom. Many of our musical prophets had stated this in their songs a long time ago. Peter Tosh in his “you can’t blame the youths” had noted this problem from a long time ago. All our political leaders are a product of our education system, a system that was never design for the advancement of our people and so when they find themself in position of power, the need to be greedy, abuse the system and get rich at the expense of everyone is the order of the day. A bloody revolution will not solve this problem. One cannot fight a bloody war to gain liberation from one self. 

The revolution must start in the heart of our people and this will take some time. Those who are demonstrating impatience are destine to replace the Devil with Satan. The end result will be one and the same. leave the talk of revolution to visioneers, or you will end up with tribal wars and in the end killing off your own brothers and sisters. You fools will not be given the opportunity to rip my country apart. 

EDITORIAL – Coke enquiry should be focused on truth

Published: Friday | March 11, 2011

Mistermel 13 hours ago 

Don’t hold your breath. many of the witnesses have purjured themselves by telling lies. As we have seen though their lies don’t add up. I don’t expect the PM to distinguish himself from the witness before him. You will see pretty much the same level of performance. 

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‘We are scared’ -Gunmen terrorise staff at Spanish Town Hospital

Published: Saturday | March 12, 2011

Mistermel 13 hours ago 

The police and soldiers cannot by themselves bring this epidemic of gun violence under control. The government and the opposition party must work together to implement tough penalties to that make these young gun criminals think about the consequences they will face for their violent and barbaric act. It is very disturbing that so far both the government and the opposition party have avoided tackling this epidemic of gun violence. One wonders if it is because of the ties some politicians have to dons and the garrison constituencies that facilitate their political survival.

If the government and the opposition party are willing to work together to ensure the safety of the people they work for then it is full time that the people demand that they start finding and implementing strategies to deal with the problem of gun violence. Simply finding these gun criminals and arresting them or killing them in police shoot-out is not working. The death penalty needs to be reinstated and other drastic measures such as life sentences, seizing of any tangible assets, imprisonment of those who aid and protect criminals are measures that will help the police and soldiers bring gun violence under control or eradicate it entirely. 

It is full time we let the government and the opposition party know that their non-response to gun crime is not acceptable and must be their priority now. We simply cannot allow gunmen to go around attack the very institution that is supposed to protect and ensure the safety of the public. It is time we put an end to gunmen terrorizing and brutally killing people. 

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Nichenry88 9 hours ago in reply to Mistermel 

Why would the opposition and the government work together when the voters are so divided? Can’t you see most Jamaican voters think act, dream, eat and drink politics based on which party they were aligned to when they were born. You think the Mps really care about the people. Why would they care about people that don’t respect themselves? The Jamaican voters elect and elect none performing MPs over and over, because they must vote for the party they were born in. The voters in Jamaica are the problem. May God Help us.  

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Mike Daley 6 hours ago in reply to Nichenry88 

Nichenry88, I tend to be at odds with you on a lot of things you say, but you are partly right. The voters are a big part of the problem for their failure to properly wield the power that they possess in their voting franchise. But then they don’t even realize that they possess any power. They really think it’s only the rich, well connected ppl uptown or the luxury car driving, import tax exempted politicians who they worship and glorify every election. However, it is the JLPNP politicians, not the people that are in a position to lead & make decision and so they, no the ppl must be held accountable for not working together. The suffering of the JAcan ppl is the collective punishment that the voters suffer. They just need to now understand that the politicians also need to suffer some consequence of their lack of will and effort to aggressively address crime and corruption. Nichenry88, sadly we may have to wait for the next generation before we fully realize that dream of an electorate and a country that hold its elected officials accountable by replacing them for poor performance. 

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Marcus Garvey ll 5 hours ago in reply to Mike Daley 

Mike:

The problem is a bit deeper than what you have suggested. The current system is not working, and I do intend to get the help of the masses in demaning a new Constitution, which should provide for a profound change in the social structure.

The family is the foundation of society. If that foundation is weak or crooked, the society is bound to suffer terribly. 

I will reveal my manifesto before long, and I hope the masses will march to Gordon House–peacefully, yes, peacefully—as I have been advocating….to demand real change. One should remember, nevertheless, that in liberal societies, governments are mere puppets of the business community. 

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Marcus Garvey ll 9 hours ago in reply to Mistermel 

Mistermel:

The government and the opposition seem to consist of empty heads. The do not have a clue of the major caused of crime and violence; thus, they should not be expected to do much to ease our pain.

The major cause of crime and violence is lack of decent family life, which has enabled many men and boys to father children at will, without providing for their needs. Naturally, that nastiness has caused many of our youngsters to go astray–stealing, raping, shooting and killing.

The death penalty will not do much good. Surely, some of the swine need to be hanged and others sent to jail, but we need to focus on the conditions which have bred the swine who are bent on destroying the wrong people—if people deserve to be destroyed, they have to be the ones who brought them in the world without proper provisions. 

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‘Bombs of failure’ – PNP knocks Government performance

Published: Saturday | March 12, 2011

Mistermel 13 hours ago 

The PNP is right about the government bomb of failures and that Golding has no vision for the country. This is a classic case of the pot calling the kettle black. What are their successes in term of making Jamaica a safer and prosperous place? And what vision have they demonstrated to fight violent gun crime and deal with the problem of political corruption. They have done absolutely nothing. Just waiting and reacting for the government to fail. Notice in their comments they refer to “negative social economic indicators such as rising poverty levels and the failure of the economy to register growth” but said nothing about the epidemic of gun criminals terrorizing and brutally killing people. 

If the PNP think that because they are the opposition party they have no obligation to initiate any measures to solve problems they are wrong. This kind of thinking must change. If they have no plan or vision now they will have none if they become the government. This selfish and non-progressive mentality does not help the country. Jamaica needs leaders in the government and the opposition party who have vision and courage to tackle the serious problems affecting the country. 

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EDITORIAL – Tsunami lessons for Jamaica

Published: Saturday | March 12, 2011

Mistermel 13 hours ago 

My understanding is that the plate tetonics in the Carribean basin are not to the types that trigger tsunami. I would suggest that the Editor do more research to confirm this before publishing any misinformation to scare people. 

you stated that the Caribbean Basin has experienced eight per cent of the world’s tsunami. When did these tsunamis occur and which islands were affecteby by them? 

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gleanerdebbian 13 hours ago in reply to Mistermel 

I don’t know sincxe I wasn’t around, but I was reliably informed that the 15th Century Port Royal disaster was a tsunami, just that the concept of tsunami’s wasn’t understood back then. 

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claude 6 hours ago in reply to Mistermel 

Suppose your understanding is wrong, it is better to overestimate so we can put in place necessary precaution hoping we will not be dealing with disaster of the magnitude of Japan who seems to be well prepared as is humanly possible 

We don’t trust PM – report

Published: Thursday | March 17, 2011

Mistermel 12 hours ago 

If my memory serves me correctly this study was done before the Dudus extradition problem as no mention is made of it being a factor. If 4 out of 10 Jamaicans lost trust in the PM because the promises he made during the election campaign to improve the structure of governance then can you imagine what that ratio is at now as a result of Dudus. It is probably something like 8 out of 10 Jamaicans not trusting him now. The 20 % who trust him are the diehard members of his party. This ration will probably change for the worst when the PM appears before the COE 

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‘Reprehensible act!’

Published: Thursday | March 17, 2011

Mistermel 12 hours ago 

As the primary institution in any society the government has a tremendous influence on the life and behavior of the people it governs. This is why it is important for the government to demonstrate good decorum and qualities of leadership that are above reproach. If the government is corrupt, lacks, integrity, lacks leadership and lacks respect for the people it governs then you will find all kinds of social disorder in the society. This is exactly the problem what we are seeing in Jamaica today. We have a political system that is dysfunctional and is deficient in its decorum. Mr. Warmington’s behavior is symptomatic of this deficient political system. The saying power corrupts and absolute power corrupts absolutely applies to most of the politicians. They seem to think that as a member of the government they can be arrogant, rude, disrespectful, and uncaring for the people they serve. The absence of guidelines for protocols and standards seems to be lacking in the government and so politician like Mr. Warmington feel they can do anything and get away with it. 

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Murders plunge – PM happy with reduction in killings but still not satisfied

Published: Wednesday | March 23, 2011

Mistermel 12 hours ago 

As the head of the government Mr. Golding needs to implement some real measures to combat crime. From my vantage point he has done little if anything to implement strategic measures to combat crime. If anyone deserves credit for the reduction in crime it is Commissioner Ellington who has shown solid leadership in fighting crime under difficult conditions. I don’t know what the political allegiance of the commissioner is but I wonder if the PMs failure to support him publicly has anything to do with politics. Instead of patting himself on the back and saying that he wants crime to be reduced to an acceptable level (no level of crime is acceptable) the PM needs to send a strong message to criminals that they will be severely punished for their crimnal actions and back this up with the appropriate measures. 

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‘Review MOU’s against Jamaican constitution’

2011-04-20 11:56:04 

Mr. Phipps five recommendations do not address the main problem that resulted in the whole sordid affair of Bruce Golding’s administration using covert actions to protect Dudus. Instead his recommendations seek to place the blame for the egregious actions of the government away from that entity. Mr. Golding and his administration are solely responsible for their actions of trying to block the extradition of Dudus. Their actions involve lies, deception, corruption, and a breach of public trust. Any recommendations that is tendered to the commission or that comes out of the commission must include measures to ensure that the government and its agents cannot surreptitiously protect a person who has a criminal background and is wanted for criminal charges whether by a local or foreign entity. 

SUICIDE WATCH – Numbers climb as professionals grow more concerned

Published: Sunday | April 24, 2011

Mistermel 16 hours ago 

The rising trend of suicide is disturbing and alarming. This is even more so when it involves children in their early teens. As a youngster growing up in the 60s I never read in the paper or heard of a child committing suicide. It was a rare occurrence then when an adult committed suicide. Understanding or finding reasons as to why a person would commit suicide is complex. Perhaps the only thing we know is that people who commit suicide lost the ability to be rational and were in such an emotional state that blocked out hope and the desire to live. Various situations such as economic hardships and the failure to achieve some desire can contribute to these conditions.

The difference between the 60s when suicide was rare and the current period where you reported an increase in suicide is that society has become more complex. This complex nature of society is manifested in hard economic times and all kinds of negative influences and vices. Concerning the negative influences and vices two things that have contributed to this are the internet and cable television. These two mediums have exposed people to all kinds of negative influences. Through these two mediums young children are exposed to pornography, violence, corruption, and indiscipline. 

Your article touched on the methods used to commit suicides but did not include or suggest what may be contributing to it. It would be interesting to note if your paper and the professionals who are concerned about the growing trend of suicides think that the internet and cable television might play a role. 

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EDITORIAL – Gangs of Gordon House must focus on jobs

Published: Sunday | April 24, 2011

Mistermel 16 hours ago 

The number one priority for the gangs of Gordon House is that they should clean up their image and reputation. We know why you have refered to them as gangs and most Jamaicans totally abhor their behavior especially as it relates to corruption and their link to dons. As long as these gangs continue their corrupt ways and their links to the dons Jamaica will not move forward. 

Asking a gang member to do positive things in their community without first getting them to denounce their gangster lifestyle will not stop them from continuing their gangster lifestyle. You need to emphasize this to the Gordon House gangs. We must get them to clean up the mess they have created by their links to dons. They can do this by denouncing the practice of garrison politics and by implementing measures to ensure that no politician is involve or support garrison politics. 

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Urgent action needed on corruption, says Christie

Published: Tuesday | April 26, 2011

Mistermel 11 hours ago 

I totally agree with Mr. Christie and have been saying this throughout most of the comments I have posted in this paper. The problem of corruption is so pervasive and would not be unreasonable to say that institutions such as the government, the judicial system and law enforcement have been compromised. With these institutions compromised by corruption it is not surprising that we see political scandals, political alliances with unsavory persons, and unprecedented number of gun toting gangs, 

With the corruption of the political system how can anyone trust the government to negotiate business deals with foreign entities? Corrupt politicians are more likely to look out for their personal interest when they make deals that are supposed to benefit the country and not themselves. 

Jamaicans in general have not made the corruption issue a serious problem. Even this newspaper has not emphasized it enough. Many Jamaicans overlook it by stating that things are improving and that they should be given a chance. What must be realized though is that even when the corrupt politicians achieve some small economic gains they will not succeed in changing the social and political conditions that are responsible for corruption, crime, and indiscipline. How can they succeed at this when they have helped to create these problems? How can they succeed when they have no integrity, no principles, and no ethics? These politicians don’t even respect the constitution they are supposed to uphold. 

It is full time we demand a change to the corrupt political system. It is time we make the corrupt politicians change their behavior and do what is right for Jamaica and not for themselves or their party. It is time for Jamaicans to rewrite the job descriptions for these selfish and power hungry politicians. And it is time we tell them that we want them to implement measures to combat political corruption, eliminate garrison politics, eliminate political ties to dons and eliminate the gun toting gangs. We are tired of their political games, lies, deceit, and arrogance.

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fatherforesight 5 hours ago in reply to Mistermel 

How do we do this sir/madam? Even the DEAD is seeing/hearing our calls with no response. I have said this constantly; Are we waiting for a Fidel or Che to come out of the BLUE MOUNTAINS and run ALL these corrupt politicians into the sea? Correct that; we all eat fish and they would surely taint them. BUT THEY HAVE TO GO; & GO QUICK. What do we do now? What are the suggestions? Diplomacy does not seem to work. Should we engage the other to let them know we are serious?

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evelynnasho 8 hours ago in reply to Mistermel 

Well done, I could not have said better….. 

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EDITORIAL – 6-step recovery programme for gangs of Gordon House

Published: Tuesday | April 26, 2011

Mistermel 11 hours ago 

First let me commend the editor for the bold stand in denouncing the politicians who sit in Gordon House to run the affairs of the country. Your editorial have correctly pointed out that recovery program is and the acknowledgement that there is a problem must first be made. My only problem with your 6-step recovery program is that you did not provide specific details on these steps.

It is clearly obvious that the “gangs of Gordon House” will not be able to transform themselves. If they could they would have done so in response to the Dudus extradition debacle. This was a big opportunity for them to do so but they continued as if it was no big deal. You suggested that if the gangs of Gordon House believe that they are incapable of this transformation, the best thing for them would probably be to disband themselves, thus providing space for clean leadership with fresh ideas. This is not practical and is not going to happen. 

I believe that many of our politicians are talented people who could do a lot of good for their country. These politicians however, have been compromised by corruption and rendered ineffective in performing to the best of their ability. I also believe that we can help these politicians transform themselves. What we have to do is to spell out the changes we want to be implemented that will help them stay honest. For example one change we need is to implement laws to impeach politicians for the following: 1)those that have ties or association with dons, 2) those who are involved in scandals that have a negative impact on the country, 3) those that violate the constitution, and 4) those that misrepresented themselves by falsification to achieve political benefit.

We need to continue to demand and expect our politicians to meet certain standards and perform their duties with integrity and honor. Anything less than this is totally unacceptable. Politicians must be held accountable for their reckless and irresponsible behavior especially when such behavior has a negative impact on people’s lives and on the country. We are tired of the political tribalism that exploits and divide Jamaicans. We are tired of political corruption and scandals, and we are tired of politicians who behave like children and who resort to knavish tricks to achieve their personal agenda or party agenda. Our politicians need to realize that it is not about them it is about the future of Jamaica.

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EDITORIAL – How MPs can help reform the gangs of Gordon House

Published: Monday | May 2, 2011 

Mistermel 10 hours ago 

The political system in Jamaica needs to undergo a political paradigm shift to transform it from its flawed and corrupt nature. The politicians who are a part of the political system are influenced by several political anomalies such as corruption, greed, power, and arrogance. These anomalies are the direct result of the politically created garrison constituencies that serves to ensure that politicians stay in power. Garrison constituencies have become the accepted model which politician use as an extension of their control over their constituents. This model must be destroyed and this is where a paradigm shift is necessary. The paradigm shift will involve a new concept of political system that embraces high standards and totally eliminate garrison constituency politics and the negative influences that evolve from it. Initiating this paradigm shift will require the concerted effort of the Jamaican people, the media, the politicians, the private sector, and the clergy. The conclusion here is that the politicians cannot do it on their own because they are a big part of the problem. 

Davies must go – G2K

Published: Thursday | May 19, 2011

Mistermel 11 hours ago 

We shoulod be careful not to rush to judgement based on the comments of Karl Blythe about Omar Davies responsibility in the financial sector meltdown. Blythe was the former minister in the PNP administration of PJ Patterson. He resigned his position because of corruption charges with Operation Pride. Blythe himself has a tarnished image and was known to attend the funeral of dons. While Davies might have some responsibility in the problems that evolved from the financial sector we should be careful to not rush to judgement based karl Blythes words. The fact is that Karl Blythe is not a credible person in this to cast a stone at Davies. 

The GTK is barking up the wrong tree. Who they should be demanding to resign is their boss the PM. What he has done to Jamaican politics is far more eggregious than the scandals involving Davies and Blythe. The system took care of Blythe and it will take care of Davies. I am not sure it will take care of the PM because many people have treated his actions in the Dudus debacle as not a serious problem. I beg toich Davies and Blythe operated in as ministers of government. 

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EDITORIAL – Mr George must redirect his focus

Published: Friday | May 20, 2011

Mistermel 10 hours ago 

Mr. George should realize that his responsibility as chairman of the COE is tremendous. If his report is influenced by his politicial affiliation with the JLP that would be very unfortunate and a disservice to the country. His report must be objective and based on the testimony of witnesses that appeared before his commission. Jamaica has a serious problem with corruption in the political system. This corruptiuon dramatically manifested itself with the the Dudus extradition saga. The fact that the government got involved by using dedceptive and covert effort to protect Dudus from extradition speks volumes to the level of corruption that has It is very obvious that politicians operate in. The challenge for Mr. George and his COE is how to come up with recommendations and solutions to dismantle this corrupt system that allowed Dudus to achieve such powerful standing in the political system. 

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WIKILEAKS SECRETS! BUSTED

Published: Sunday | May 22, 2011

Mistermel 11 hours ago 

Although Bruce played the leading role in Dudus blockbuster extradition case I think the whole affair has eclipsed him. The point is that the whole political system is a cess pool of corruption. Calling for Bruce’s resignation is OK but remember if he resigns the corruption still remains. Therefore, we must also demand that the political system be reformed to clean up the cess pool of corruption. We must force the government to implement measures to impeach politicians who commit egregious problems that are detrimental to the country, unethical, dishonorable, and contrary to the values good citizenship. We must force them to implement measures to dismantle garrison constituencies and impeach those politicians who have any contact with dons (or people who are not law abiding citizens) to oversee their constituencies. 

Bruce Golding is not going to resign just because we ask him to. And comes next election the people of Tivoli Garden will reelect him. The only way to get rid of politician like Bruce is to have laws in place to impeach them and force them out of office. I guarantee that if we had such laws in place we would not be wasting time and energy over calling for his resignation. It is imperative then that we do everything possible to get impeachment measures in the books and other measures to dismantle garrison constituencies once and for all.

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No spite – Blythe

Published: Sunday | May 22, 2011

Mistermel 11 hours ago 

This is why I keep making the argument that unless measures are put in place to impeach politicians when they are found to be involved in irregularities or corruption. If these measures were in place when Dr. Blythe was in office we would not be having this discussion today. He too would have been impeached for his role in Operation Pride and he would have been banished from politics forever. Likewise if Dr. Davies is found to be guilty of the financial sector meltdown and if he was involved in corrupt policies that led to this meltdown then he too should be banished from politics. 

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Sharon’s flip-flop, PNP MP renounces then keeps US citizenship\

Published: Sunday | May 22, 2011

Mistermel 11 hours ago 

What is the matter with these politicians. Don’t they have any respect to the constitution of Jamaica. If they can’t obey or respect the laws that are embodied in the constitution how can they expect others to do the same. When politicians show this kind of blatant disregard for the constituion then they are no different from gangs who flout the laws. Come on Ms. Hay-Webster do the right thing resign or renounce your US citizenshp now. You can’t have it both ways. 

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Fight for the seat – Mixed reactions threaten to loosen JLP foothold in Tivoli Gardens

Published: Monday | May 23, 2011

Mistermel      13 hours ago

I know that this picture was taken awhile back but it congures all kinds of negative things in my mind. First no politician should engage a police in an argument especially with so many people in earshot. I don’t know what the conversation was about but it certainly wasn’t a friendly one considering the PM’s body language and facial expression. My problem here is that I feel it is inappropriate for a politician and especially the PM to confront the police in such open manner. To me it sends the message that the PM is using his power to get the police to do his bidding. This kind of confrontation puts the police on the spot as they might be intimidated into performing their duties. I hope in the future we don’t see a MP or the PM doing confronting the police in public.

vhpy and 31 more liked this

This how rumor begin.  The report made no mention of a confrontation between the two but you have to arrive at that conclusion.  How stupid.

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I agree with you but this is the image of other JLP politicians. Foe example, VazRobertson and Montague to name those that come readies to mind. If the politicians do not respect the police or stop them from carrying out their duties then why should the ma in the street. Very bad image.

7 people liked this.

I concur

5 people liked this.

Same things he was defending that led to the fightings, then they blame  they  the `misleds` for it.

if you dont know what the@ mistermel

Amnesty demands justice for Tivoli victims

Published: Monday | May 23, 2011

Mistermel      9 hours ago

Amnesty International simply does not understand what really happened in Tivoli Gardens. From my understanding of what happened in Tivoli Grarden that the police did not start the confrontation. These were protestors who angrily confronted the people and I dare gs and criminals and the police say (knowing the reputation of some of the residents there) that may were heavily armed. When Amnesty International make this allegation of human rights they are defending criminals and thugs to disregard the police and do whatever they want. This cannot work the police has to maintain law and order especially in thge volatile situation that developed in Tivoli Gardens. My suggestion to Amnesty is to butt out of Jamaica’s business and let the police do their job. If they want to find human rights abuse go to China. Ofcourse you are not going to mess with a powerful country because you like to pick on small third world countries like jamaica. There is a jamaican saying “duppy know who fi frighten.” Go away Amnesty International you are a duppy and you are not frightening anyone in jamaica. We have a serious problem with gangs and criminals who will kill and have killed police officers with impunity. Are these the people you are defending and claiming that their human rights was violated?

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Restitution, repentance is what Jamaica needs

Published: Monday | May 23, 2011

Mistermel      9 hours ago

All people need to be aware of is that there are spiritual laws that govern all life. These laws are absolute meaning they apply to every human being. When you are in conflict with these laws or violate them there are consequences. This is wahat some called karma or sin. The best guideline for conforming to spiritual laws is the Golden Rule. Do unto others as you would have them do to you. People don’t need religious zealots to interpret the bible for them and tell them that God will punish them. God does not punish anyone and their interpretation of the bible creates more confusion than understanding. I understand the basic message these religious zealots are peddling but we have to deal with practical matter in a practical way. Jesus said that faith withopt works is dead. What Jamaica really need to do is to implement laws to impeach politicians who are involved in corruption schemes and who are linked to dons and thugs.

James loses visa

Published: Tuesday | May 24, 2011

Mistermel      8 hours ago

He needs to lose his ministerial position too. He has been involved in too much controversy. It is time we clean up this cess pool of corruption and get rid of politicians who are unworthy of the office they hold.

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EDITORIAL – Shameless Sharon and the PNP gang

Published: Tuesday | May 24, 2011

Mistermel      11 hours ago

Ms. Sharon Hay-Webster is testimony to why corruption and disdain for law and order by so many people exist today. When you have politicians who are corrupt, who do not respect the constitution, who are arrogant, and who act as if they are above the law then it is no wonder that the country is experiencing unprecedented social disorder and gangs roaming the island committing various crimes and terrorizing people. We need laws to impeach politician like Ms. Hay-Webster and banish them from public office. Once they commit an impeachable that’s it, the impeachment proceedings are activated. If we had impeachment laws we would not be wasting time critizing Ms. hay-Webster and begging het to resign. This is complete nonsense. Jamaica needs to do better than this. How can a country make progress if people are not held accountable for their irresponsible behavior?

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Release them all, Government of Jamaica tells Gleaner

Published: Thursday | May 26, 2011

Mistermel      14 hours ago

Vaz is clueless and is in the wrong position. As Information Minister he should be more astute than that instead of being arrogant and daring. The Gleaner has the right to be selective and publish what they want to publish. All news media do that. Not saying it is right but that’s the nature of the game. daring them to publish all is not a good ploy.

2 people liked this

Cables cite Golding’s worry over corrupt party members

Published: Thursday | May 26, 2011

Mistermel      14 hours ago

If there is anything to be learned from the WikiLeak cables it is the insight it provides to the character of our political leaders. Here we find out that Bruce Golding might have been aware of corrupt members of his party before he became PM. And after he became PM he he wanted to isolate and remove tainted individuals from involvement in the JLP. However, to do so, he needs more than just rumours. Well we know he did absolutely nothing to clean up this corruption. This was in 2007 now fast forward to early 2010 when he himself was a part of the Dudus fiasco.
 
Mr. Golding has a propensity for making excuses whenever he comes under strong criticism. The WikiLeak documents validate this as he comes up with the excuse that he needs more than just rumors to remove tainted individuals from the party. Wow! what kind of leader is this?

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Sharon states her case

Published: Thursday | May 26, 2011

Mistermel      8 hours ago

Do you still have a valid US passport Ms. hay-Webster?

4 people liked this

Mistermel      14 hours ago

Question for Ms. Hay-Webster in response to her statement ” I landed here in Jamaica as a baby, months old, with a passport issued by the United States of America.”

DO YOU STILL HAVE A VALID US PASSPORT? 

You did not provide that information….please tell us.

EDITORIAL – Uninspiring shuffle

Published: Thursday | May 26, 2011

Mistermel      14 hours ago

The shuffling of the government and the opposition party reminds me of corporations repackaging a product and trying to pass it off as new and improved. Usually the only thing that is new is the packaging. This is what the government and the opposition have done by shuffling their organization. We still have the same old, tired, and unspiring politicians. The difference is that some are given new titles or positions. So are we to expect that thee same people are going to produce a new vision for? Are they going to solve the real problems of corruption in the political system and bring an end to garrison constituencies? I doubt it.

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Portia warned!

Published: Friday | May 27, 2011

Mistermel      13 hours ago

The question then is what was her reaction to this warning? My bet is she did nothing as Jamaican political leaders tend to do when it comes to dealing with their corrupt colleagues.

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PNPYO adds voice to call for Hay-Webster’s resignation

Published: Friday | May 27, 2011

Mistermel      13 hours ago

I am wondering if one of the reasons why so many of our politicians stubbornly refuse to resign their parliamentary or ministerial position is because politics is their sole means of making a decent living. Many of our politicians did not leave lucrative positions to enter positions. In private life most of these politicians are just ordinary citizens who hardly get any attention from their neighbors. Politics give them an opportunity to enjoy power, recognition, and privileges. Nobody likes to give up these things that easily. Perhaps this is the situation with Ms. Hay-Webster and other politicians who don’t know how to quit when they violate the trust, integrity, honesty, and confidence their constituents place in them by electing them.

2 people liked this

Clear Marcus Garvey’s name!

Published: Friday | May 27, 2011

Mistermel      13 hours ago

I do not have any admiration for Babsy Grange because like so many of her colleagues she has been linked to corrupt garrison constituency politics. If she was to denounce garrison constituency politics and dons, I believe this would be much bigger than her effort to clear Marcus Garvey name. Garrison constituency politics with their dons who have ties to politicians is a serious problem that undermines the governance of Jamaica. The Marcus Garvey situation it is not a priority even though it is long overdue.

EDITORIAL – The James Robertson affair

Published: Friday | May 27, 2011

Mistermel      13 hours ago

The US government is doing Jamaica a favor by doing what our political leaders don’t have the guts and courage to do – expose and get rid of corrupt politicians or people like Dudus who was associated with corrupt politicians.

Erwin M and 8 more liked this

Hay-Webster should stay

Published: Monday | May 30, 2011

Mistermel      21 hours ago

The Gavel is condoning a serious problem that involves a politician violating the constitution. If politicians can’t honor and abide the statutes of the constitution how can we expect them to have integrity and not be involved in corruption. The constitution delineates the boundaries of the political process and if we allow politicians to make even a small step across these boundaries then we deserve all the negative things that follow.
The Gavel is wrong to assert that they don’t think Ms. Hay-Webster situation rises to the level for us to demand that she packs her bags and go. Any politician who violate the constitution and continue to uses deceptive tactics to cover up this violation should pack their bags pronto. We must learn to abide by rules and regulations and we must pay consequences when we don’t.

ESTEBANAGOSTOREID777 and 3 more liked this

Christie widens fraud probe

Published: Wednesday | June 1, 2011

Mistermel      9 hours ago

Mr. Christie is doing an excellent but we need mor people to support him and to help clean up this stinging cesspool of corruption. The political system is corrupt from top to bottom and the political leaders are doing nothing to indicate that they want to clean it up. Instead of initiating measures to clean up themselves and to clean up the cesspool of corruption they  behave as if the only thing that matters to them is retaining power or getting re-elected. We need to keep the pressure on this bunch of corrupt scum bags until they have no option but to clean up the corruption.

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EDITORIAL – Golding as advocate for The Gleaner

Published: Wednesday | June 1, 2011

Mistermel      12 hours ago

If the editor thinks that Mr. Golding would be a good advocate for Gleaner then he or she is living in a fantasy world. Heads of government and the news media are not natural allies. And it doesn’t matter the type of political system is in place heads of government would prefer if the news media did not exist.

You don’t need Bruce Golding to be an advocate of your paper and you don’t need to make flattering and outlandish statements about him being an eloquent speaker, with a sharp, analytical mind and the capacity to get to the kernel of issues. It seems to me that after beating up on him (which I believe he deserved) you now have second thoughts and feeling threatened by his desperate attack on you. You don’t have to suck up to Bruce Golding, he has done more damage to Jamaica than any hurricane has done. Furthermore, he has not used the sharp, analytical mind and the capacity to get to the kernel of issues that you think he has to deal with the serious problems affecting the country.

ESTEBANAGOSTOREID777 and 2 more liked this Like ReplyReply

Dear Misternel – have you not heard of satire? Read it again carefully and try to understand what this brilliant editorial is saying.

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Cable: JLP caused its own problems

Published: Friday | June 3, 2011

Mistermel      11 hours ago

All Jamaicans know by now that the problem with Mr. Golding’s party and government is leadership. Clearly, Mr. Golding has not demonstrated the kind of leadership that is desperately needed to govern an indisciplined society that is rampant with gangs, horrofic gun crimes, high unemployment, and corruption. For those die hard JLP supporters the WikiLeak cables should make them realize now that Mr. Golding does not have the right stuff to lead.

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And guess what Mistermel the PNP could never be worst especially in terms of Leadership, If you were to compare Leadership then you surely have to give it to Mr. Golding and its not about a man or woman Its about Leadership. He can represent this country and will not baffle or fumbles on his word he thinks for himself.

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Manatt back in focus

Published: Monday | June 6, 2011

Mistermel      8 hours ago

If you live in a glass house you shouldn’t throw stones. The Opposition party should heed this well known adage. What would serve them well is to denounce the very problems that led to the Dudus debacle, i.e, garrison constituencies and corruption of the political system by this association of politicians with dons. And in denouncing these things they should pledge a committment to to do everything possible to ensure that garrison constituencies are dismantlesd and that politicians are held accountable for their ties to dons. This is what the Opposition needs to do not try to score political points from a mistake the government made that they are also guilty of.

5 people liked this.

Weak Portia – ‘Captain, the ship is sinking’

Published: Thursday | June 9, 2011

Mistermel      12 hours ago

During the past three decades or even more the quality of life in Jamaica has steadily declined to its current state. Several problems that that emerged back then remained unsolved today and has consequently put the country in its worst situation. The economy for example has shown little growth as indicated by our worthless dollar, high unemployment, and lack of good investment opportunities. Other problems such as unprecedented gun crimes and corruption of the political system have contributed to the country making any significant progress.


In 2012 Jamaica will celebrate its 50th independence anniversary. Fifty years is a period where most people by then should have accomplished all their life goals. If they don’t then there is almost no chance for them to achieve anything much. Let’s hope this is not the case for Jamaica. Jamaica has the capability to achieve great things but it cannot be done under the current system of political corruption. What this means is that the political system must transform itself to the point where corruption cannot be facilitated.


If the political system in Jamaica is to be transformed knew leadership will be required at all political levels. This is a daunting task and will require a charismatic, strong, and visionary leader to do this. This kind of leadership is what is lacking in Jamaica today. The current political leaders are don’t have charisma, don’t’ have any vision, and are weak. The future does not look bright for Jamaica if it is to continue under the current leaders who don’t have any answers or will to keep the ship afloat.

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ESTEBANAGOSTOREID777      8 hours ago in reply to Mistermel

Do we really need a  charismatic leader today to transform the Jamaican political system? Are we still tied to the MAN OF THE PEOPLE syndrome/paradigm?

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‘Be prepared to march’

Published: Tuesday | June 14, 2011

Mistermel      13 hours ago

What is a march going to accomplish anyways? As usual such protests bring out the party thugs who have no real understanding of anything or any real concern about serious problems. They march because their political puppet master tells them to march. We can use other means to address opposition to issues. If the COE does not produce the results that the PNP wants then they should use the media to voice their concerns. Protest is good only when reasonable measures have been used without success. For example if the COE says that Golding should resign and the public strongly endorse this position, then a march would be OK if Mr. Golding refuses to step down.

ESTEBANAGOSTOREID777 and 3 more liked this

JUDGEMENT: Manatt-Dudus report goes to Parliament today

Published: Tuesday | June 14, 2011

Mistermel      13 hours ago

Judgment day for Golding and his conspirators. Will the COE do further damage to his political career or will it give him a slap on the wrist? The one thing I want the COE to do is to strongly recommend measures that the government should implement to ensure that an issue like the Dudus extradition does not occur again. And if these measures include dismantling the garrison constituencies such that no politician will work or associate with dons or anyone who is of ill repute. Any politician who does this would then face impeachment charges. If the COE does this then it will help to put pressure on the government to implement these measures. If it does not recommend measures to dismantle garrison constituencies and the corruption in the political system then the COE in my opinion would be a total failure.

TrevDiMan and 6 more liked this

US evangelist Lewis walks free

Published: Tuesday | June 14, 2011

Mistermel      13 hours ago

Mr. Lewis is lucky that he was not prosecuted in a US court because they would have put him away for a long time. Rape and sexual molestation of minors does not seem to be a serious criminal offence in Jamaica. How many times have you heard of an arrest for an adult having carnal knowledge of an underage girl? Not very often and it is not that it does not happen. The other problem that helped Mr. Lewis is that Jamaicans tend to see ministers of religion above reproach. If someone accuses a minister of some wrong doing it is the devil trying to bring down that minister. All these ministers are just ordinary men like you and I. They have their lusts and some or even sexually deviant. I have no doubt that the man did not molest the two young girls but it is not for me to judge him. For now he has escaped the law of man but if he is guilty he cannot escape the spiritual law of karma.

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No casualties

Published: Wednesday | June 15, 2011

Mistermel      13 hours ago

The COE report is a disservice to the people of Jamaica. I say this not because it did not crucify Golding but because it is very simplistic. When you consider the evidence brought before the commission, the egregiousness of the issue, and the corruption that was exposed at the highest level of government it is mind boggling that the COE could produce a report that lacks substance. Of the four recommendations the COE offered two applied to them.
I am not totally surprised by the COE report I expected it to exonerate Golding but not in the easy manner it did. The COE is very unfortunate in that it missed a great opportunity to help reform the corrupt political system. With the blessing of the report the political status quo will remain the same. No one is held accountable for a situation that grossly undermined the government. What a sham

     vhpy and 37 more liked this

JLP says it’s satisfied

Published: Wednesday | June 15, 2011

‘Split justice minister from attorney general’

Published: Wednesday | June 15, 2011

Mistermel      13 hours ago

The COE is way off target for making the recommendation to split the justice minister from attorney general. This dual position was not the cause for the lapse in good political judgment and the corrupt and deceptive manner in which the Dudus matter was handled. It had more to do with corruption and unethical politicians and civil servants. They were hell bent on protecting Dudus as a favor for his effort in shepherding the Tivoli Garden community. These recommendations like the others are very simplistic and lack substance for meaningful political reform. One could conclude from this that the political corruption seeped into the COE.

     vhpy and 7 more liked this

Private sector grades Dudus report

Published: Thursday | June 16, 2011

Mistermel      15 hours ago

I have been saying this from day one. You cannot rid the political system of corruption if you don’t have measures to punish those involved in the corruption. The COE report failed to recognize this and therefore was not able to make the necessary recommendations. I encourage Mr. Azan to pressure the government to implement measures to impeach corrupt politicians.

vhpy and 8 more liked this 

‘A travesty of justice’

Published: Thursday | June 16, 2011

Mistermel      15 hours ago

The COE report is a weak report as it does not address the root cause of the problem that led to the protection of Dudus from extradition. The report in general is so simplistic and is completely of target with respect to its assessment and recommendations. As with any issue or conflict you will have winners and losers. The winners here is the PM and the JLP. The losers are the Jamaican people and Mr. Emile George. While the PM may feel vindicated and that he has come out of this COE victorious, his victory not be permanent. He still has a lot to answer for and a lot to do to restore his integrity and trust to the Jamaican people. If he is really a smart man as some have indicated he could do this by starting the reformation of the political system to end corruption.

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‘Coke’s privacy was violated’

Published: Friday | June 17, 2011

Mistermel      15 hours ago

I understand the concept of invading one’s privacy. However, when that privacy is invaded to apprehend a person who is engaging in criminal activities I have no problem for whatever method is used. And I know that criminals have their constitutional rights but I feel that when they do criminal things they forfeit that right. There should be a law that if there is a preponderance of evidence against an accused person then they lose any rights they have.

     vhpy and 48 more liked this 

di man kill allegedly people fi a living. him no have no privacy

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John Blake45      8 hours ago in reply to Yardman

allegedly?

1 person liked this. 

Nice try, but not going to stand up. The US Govt intercept persons overseas all the time and bringh them to american justice/courts. So long as the “violations” did not occur on US soils, this argument will fail. The lawyers are just milking Coke for all he $got. He will be very broke when all this is done. Time to cop a plea deal and turn in his cohorts. I think that is asking too much because he would then be a dead man… just my thoughs.

     Erwin M and 8 more liked this Like ReplyReply

Why would he be dead? He controlled the distribution of guns so nuff gunman in debt to him. I am sure they would defend him against all comers as they did in Tivoli.

I completely agree with you! If Jamaica could be Jamaica again where there was no skyrocketing murder rate and be safe and peaceful as when I was growing up because of the use of wiretaps to smoke out the criminals and their political affiliates, I say tap away!

     vhpy and 7 more liked this 

have they found him guilty as yet?..think before you write…some of you rights should be taken away from you one day because someone thinks you are a criminal…everyone should have the same rights, until they are found guilty….

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John Blake45      8 hours ago in reply to jahh

Jahh! you are in the real world. Black people will never get it. To believe and not know is normal in all black societies which are loaded with unintelligent but so called ‘educated’.

Until you find yourself in that position where you are being accused until you are proven guilty, then will you fully understand the scope of whats going on here. Privacy is privacy, no matter when and no matter when. America and other countries defend the rights of their people to no end, why should we give up our rights and people to others….criminal or not. The last time i checked a person is innocent until proven guilty.

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Winston G      14 hours ago in reply to Mistermel 

You and I see eye to eye on this. But I am just now thinking to myself why these laws MAY exist. (I’m not a lawyer). Let us assume that what we both desire happens – it now becomes legal for the privacy of “criminals” to be invaded. What will protect you and I from being dubbed a criminal by corrupt police. And what will stop them from intercepting our personal conversations under a false claim that they had suspicion that we were criminals. I guess there are no easy answers.

     St. Marian and 2 more liked this 

If you are not a criminal it shouldn’t be a problem if the police listen to your conversations. You would have nothing to hide. They can tap all my phones & if they suspect anybody of wrong doings they should tap theirs too.

2 people liked this. 

Funny. Wonder if you’ve taken that to its logical conclusion …..?

Just like you said criminals have constitutional rights too. That is why we have a court system to sort this process out and guarantee that each person is treated fairly whether or not the person is engaged in illegal activities.

Well I wouldn’t say “any” rights, but definitely, some rights – including the right to privacy. I mean, seriously, many of the crimes Coke is accused of were done in private.Convicted criminals lose their right of “freedom to roam in public spaces” for example.

Manatt commission findings ‘unacceptable’

Published: Friday | June 17, 2011

Mistermel      9 hours ago

Whenever you have serious corruption problems that affect the high levels of government you are going to have a lot of people becoming a casualty of this corruption. Mr. Emil George became a casualty of that corruption when he and the other COE commissioners provided a bias COE report. The unfortunate thing about this Dudus issue is that no one has been held accountable for what could be described as high crime and misdemeanors. Yes it is a crime whenever you try to protect a person that is accused of criminal activities. And it is high crime because it involved the highest levels of the government including the office of PM and the Justice department.

3 people liked this

Hay-Webster rips PNP – Embattled MP resigns from party, but hangs on to seat

Published: Wednesday | June 29, 2011

Mistermel      14 hours ago

It is time that Jamaican politicians learn to respect the constitution and abide by it. How can anyone expect them to have any integrity and ethics when they have no sense of what the constitution signifies. This issue of politicians like Ms. Hay Webster having dual citizenship should never be an issue. As for as I am concerned she should be stripped of her seat also. It is not a honorable thing to violate the constitution and still sit in Gordon House as a parlimentarian. All politicians on their nomination for political office should be properly screened to ensure that they are not in violation of the constitution or any legal matters. It is time that politicians act in a responsible and accountable manner.

3 people liked this.

EDITORIAL – The political gangs disillusioned Jamaica

Published: Wednesday | June 29, 2011

Mistermel      13 hours ago

When more than fifty percent of Jamaicans believe that they would have been better off if Jamaica was still a British colony you wonder if there is any real hope for Jamaica. This is indeed very sad because it reinforces the old racial ideas that black people are not capable of making progress on their own. We have more educated politicians than any time in our history and yet the current government and opposition party are perhaps the worst. These two entities are more corrupt and more incompetent than those during the earlier years after independence. Whatever foundation that the earlier governments laid the current political leaders have destroyed it by their corrupt behavior and ties to the notorious system we know as garrison constituencies and their dons.

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Commissioner-in-waiting – Eleven-year-old determined to head police force

Published: Thursday | June 30, 2011 21 Comments

Mistermel      15 hours ago

This is one of the things we need to do for the youths of Jamaica. We need to encourage them and inspire them. Congratulations to the Commissioner for giving young Devonio James this opportunity. It is a moment he will never forget and it will help to launch his ambition to a great future.

St. Marian and 28 more liked this 

Future Commissioner James      4 hours ago in reply to Mistermel

Thank you for your encouragement.

EDITORIAL – PM might have been bolder, but …

Published: Thursday | June 30, 2011

Mistermel      15 hours ago

It doesn’t matter how much restructuring or reshuffling the PM does to the cabinet when he is not committed to wiping out the cancer of corruption that is slowly killing the political system. If you have a barrel of apples and there are some rotten ones in the barrel sooner or later the entire barrel becomes rotten. Until the political leaders come to understand that if there is a nexus between them and corruption (real or perceived) they will not be trusted and respected. Furthermore when an organization is infected with corruption the organization loses its effectiveness in achieving quality results. My advice to the political leaders is to renounce their ties to the garrison constituency politics and implement measures to impeach politicians who discredit their office or parliamentary status with corruption or by illegal means.

vhpy and 6 more liked this

But isn’t this what Golding had promised us – to renounce his ties to the garrison constituency politics ?

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Defiant Dorothy! Former justice minister and attorney general insists she acted appropriately in ‘Dudus‘ extradition matter

Published: Sunday | July 3, 2011

Mistermel      13 hours ago

When you are involved in corruption the only way you can salvage whatever reputation and integrity you had is to be forthright from the beginning. Failure to do this means you lock yourself into an untenable position to fight back after you are thrown under the bus. This is the situation that Dorothy Lightbourne finds herself in. She could have been more forthright in the COE hearings knowing that she was already badly damaged before the hearings started. Unfortunately for her she seems to be politically naive in thinking that she would retain her ministerial position. If she tries to tell the truth now who is going to believe her. Her credibility has been shot and the only thing she can do is take petty shots at her former boss the PM and try to justify her actions. Too late Dorothy, walk away into the sunset and if you want write a book and tell your side of the story.

NomDePloom and 7 more liked this

Bruce makes a comeback! – 7 per cent jump in favourability rating

Published: Sunday | July 3, 2011

Mistermel      13 hours ago

The Gleaner should do a better job in providing objective and substantive comparable analysis of the political leadership of both parties. I noticed the pattern of favorable news stores for the JLP including this one while the PNP gets unfavorable stories such as the one in today’s edition titled “Has the PNP lost its way: Party appears split on core principles and values.” Your story today “Bruce Makes a Comeback” is superficial and appears to be based on polls that does not seems to have a broad sampling of the population of eligible voters. All you are doing is firing up the election fires.


My suggestion to the Gleaner is that they should help the public find out who will do a better job in governing the country. The Gleaner can do this by providing evaluations on how the political leadership would handle major issues affecting the country. Go out and interview the PM and the Portia and ask them what they intend to do about corruption, how they plan to wipe out violent gun crimes, how they plan to revitalize the economy, etc. This will help people see who has a better grasp and plan on the issues. Your meaningless straw poll serves no purpose but to hype your favorite side.

5 people liked this

Heirs to the throne

Published: Tuesday | July 5, 2011

Mistermel      13 hours ago

The Gleaner should not use polls as a basis for promoting candidates for political leadership. It is not helpful and useful in finding out if the candidates that the polls select are really good candidates. While we know a little about Mr. Phillips’ political position we hardly know anything about Mr. Holness. And even with Mr. Phillips we do not know what is positions are on the key issues affecting the country. The Gleaner would do a better service for its readers if it interviews these men to get their position on the key issues. Why use polls to find out who is the heir apparent to Bruce Golding and Portia Simpson-Miller? Polls are useless especially where you have an electorate that traditionally has been overwhelmingly influenced by tribal politics. As such this electorate does not seems to pay much attention to real issues and therefore not able to give a good assessment of the issues.


Mr. Holness appears to be a decent man but that is not a prerequisite for political leadership. One has to demonstrate strong leadership qualities and take a stand on issues even when they might be unfavorable to the party. Mr. Patterson was a nice guy and I don’t think he was a strong political leader. Jamaica needs strong political leaders to move it forward and deal with corruption, crime, high unemployment, and other economic issues. Until we know where any heir apparent for political leadership stands on these issues let’s not call them heir apparent based on a superficial poll.

Jongfellow and 11 more liked this

Cops silent on X5 driver’s arrest

Published: Tuesday | July 5, 2011

Mistermel      13 hours ago

It’s not unusual for the cops to keep a tight lid on cases that are high profile and sensitive until they are sure they have their ducks in a row. My suspicion is that if they do have a suspect in custody, this person probably has connections and might be lawyering up. Let’s be patient with the police soon we will get details of who they have in custody if in fact they do have one.

Jongfellow and 15 more liked this

EDITORIAL – Gangs of Gordon House busted

Published: Tuesday | July 5, 2011

Mistermel      13 hours ago

Again I have to emphasize that polls or survey are useless especially in a country where things do not get done by mere public opinion. If this was the case Bruce Golding would not be PM today following his involvement in the Dudus extradition affair. If you really want to bust the gangs of Gordon House then you must put pressure on them to change their gangster politics. Get them to implement measures to make it hard for politicians to get involved in corrupt schemes and if they do they are stripped of their political office and parliamentary position. You will better serve the people of Jamaica and help to make Jamaica a better place.

2 people liked this

Under fire, FLA chided for lowering shooting pass mark, suspending written exam requirements

Published: Sunday | July 10, 2011

Mistermel      13 hours ago

What purpose does this agency serve when there are so many illegal guns in the hands of criminals and thugs? The criminals and thugs who possess illegal firearms don’t have to pass a marksmanship or written exam yet they kill more people than the police and the JDF soldiiers combined do. Jamaica would better be served if there is an agency that have the authority to get illegal guns off the streets; prosecute those who have them; and confiscate their property (including the property of those who protect them and harbour them).

5 people liked this

More guns out!

Published: Sunday | July 10, 2011

Mistermel      13 hours ago

Since the dumb politicians don’t know how to disarm the thugs and criminals why not just let everyone carry guns. This way we can have a kind of Wild West society where the good guys armed with thier licensed firearm have a shootout with the thugs and criminals with their illegal guns.

EDITORIAL: GG has real power to appoint enquirers

Published: Sunday | July 10, 2011

Mistermel      13 hours ago 

I said this from the very beginning of the Dudus affair that the GG should have the power to appoint a COE. Now I am learning that he does indeed have this authority. The regulations or constitution should be amended to allow the GG to be the sole entity that not only decides when a COE is required but also its composition. We cannot allow politicians like the PM to pick and set the terms of reference for a COE that involves a political issue or an issue that they are involved in. It is time we do things right otherwise we will never make any real progress.

     NomDePloom liked this

X6 murder suspect returns, being interrogated by police

2011-07-11 12:40:44

     Mistermel     
The police is handling this matter in a manner that is not only inconsistent and contrary to their policies but also in a manner that shows that they treat suspects who are well connected differently by giving them special privilleges. This is disgraceful and must not be allowed to continue. All suspects regardles of their social status or connections must be treated the same. You can’t release the names of some people as persons of interest but when you have a primary suspect you don’t release his names. There is absolutely no excuse for this and no justification for it.

Today, 2:54:11 PM

2 Guests

From the day this young man was brutally murdered his picture and name has been in the paper on a daily basis. Contrast this with thehis killer who the police know and has declared as the suspect but who remains nameless and with no picture in the media. Something is very wrong here and the media should be pressuring the police to release his name and his picture. Evil doers must be exposed and should not be protected or given special privilleges.

Today, 3:01:18 PM

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My God what the hell is going on here with the police. They are interrogating the suspect. He should be arrested. The man fled the country after allegedly commiting a brutal crime. The police have evidence that he is the primary suspect. They went to his house they seized ganga at his house (he should at least be arrested for this). They impounded his vehicle what eles do they need to arrest him. If he has not being arrested or taken into custody that means he is freee to go home. This is appalling and and all Jamaicans should be appalled by this.

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‘Double standard rule on persons of interest’

2011-07-11 18:00:03

I am not a supporter or admirer of JFJ and in the past have posted critical posts about that group. This is one time I support them and completely agree with them. the Commissioner of police needs to to give an explanation as to why they are not releasing the name of the ssuspect. As I said in related posts it is inconsistent and contrary to the policies of the police when the release the name of people of interest (these are not suspects) and other suspects but will not release the name of a primary suspect that they have overwhelming evidence thatbhe committed the brutal killing of the young man.

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Puzzle over lack of name in X6-killer probe

Published: Monday | July 11, 2011

Mistermel      10 hours ago

This is not only a double standard it is a shameful and disgraceful behavior police. Not releasing the name of the BMW suspect is very contrary to law enforcement policies. The police consistently release the names of “People of Interest” mark you not suspects and ask them to contact the police. And they do release the names of suspect for people apparently who are not rich or well connected. So why can’t they release the name of the BMW suspect when there is overwhelming evidence against this person that he did commit a brutal crime? The only conclusion I can reach is that the police is protecting the suspect’s high profile connections. All Jamaicans should be outraged about this and the media should do a better job of demanding the release of the suspect’s name. The public has a right to know because this man is a danger to society.

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X6 driver could be charged2011-07-12 12:12:13 | (66 Comments)

Janet Silvera, Senior Gleaner Writer

I am now seeing a side of the police that I didn’t think exist and that is their incompetence. They should be charging this man with a capital murder charge. Instead they are treating him with special privilege and allowing his lawyer to dictate conditions to them. Missing from this bizarre and strange case is the input from the prosecutor. You would think that the Public prosecutor would be on top of this and making sure that government prosecute this man to the full extent of the law. But wait if I recall the prosecutor had her own problems with another case. And quite frankly I don’t trust her either. This case against the suspect stinks with corruption left and right.

Today, 6:22:29 PM

X6 suspect to be questioned

Published: Tuesday | July 12, 2011

noshel      16 hours ago

This whole thing start to sound like a circus, where people are covering up for the suspect!.. I find it very strange that if the pathologist did not see an exit wound in the head of the deceased, it should be automatic that they do an ex-ray immediately!…
I only hope that they will find the bullet fragment, because from what I am understanding here , it seem like they are preparing a defense of  the cause of death!..

If I was the Mother I would borrow the money and have an independent pathologist flown in to do the autopsy!. She also must get a hold of the medical record of her son from when he had arrived at the hospital,  with the name of the doctors who treat or was trying to treat him before he pass!..

Just to make sure that none of the emergency staff did not remove the bullet and some how discarded it!.

     vhpy and 83 more liked this

Mistermel      13 hours ago in reply to noshel

Noshel you like most of us are sensing the corruption that might have engulfed this bizarre case. With corruption so rife in the society and the peception that it affects all the major institutions it is hard to get to the truth in any serious problem. The society in general seems to be stuck in this quagmire of corruption with no hope of getting out of it.

1 person liked this.

Mistermel      15 hours ago

Commissioner Ellington has earned a lot of praise for the way he has handled corruption and other problems with the police. I was also beginning to think he is probably the best Commissioner the police has had considering the unprecedented level of hardcore crime and corruption that is overwhelming the country. I also was beginning to think that he was not going to allow politicians to control him. Now I am not sure this one case with the nameless BMW X6 suspect has shattered belief in the Commissioner and his police force. With the police already facing a credibility and trust problem this case does not help them to restore the trust they desperately need in fighting crime. You cannot ask the public for help when it appears that you are hiding or helping to cover up a serious problem of murder.

     ESTEBANAGOSTOREID777 and 56 more liked this Like ReplyReply

And in all of this high profile case, commanding such national attention and outrage, we have not heard one word from the Commissioner. In most first world country’s the Top Law Officer would have held at least a daily Press Conference on the matter. And by the way they solve their crimes in an expeditious manner most of the times.

2 people liked this.

X6 suspect’s attorney gives thumbs up to cops

Published: Tuesday | July 12, 2011

Mistermel      14 hours ago

This defense attorney is wrong. Once this suspect fled the country his name should have been released to the public. If this brutal murder had occurred in a developed country his name would have become public once he fled. At this stage he is a fugitive from justice and this is where law enforcement has to solicit the help of the public to locate him.
 
OK now he is back in the country and the police are giving him every opportunity to tell his side of the story. Despite overwhelming evidence that the police have against this suspect he still remains nameless. They have not yet even arrested him. He should have been arrested and booked the moment he returned to the island.
 
In the past the police have released the names of suspects and even people they call “people of interest.” So what is different here? Privilege, money, political connections, and access to top lawyers? If the police use this as a template as this defense attorney is suggesting it will be a big setback for fighting crime. The police needs to do better than this and not let powerful entities influence them and interfere with the performance of their duties.

     ESTEBANAGOSTOREID777 and 15 more liked this

Kids in firing line – Advocates outraged by spate of child murders

Published: Thursday | July 14, 2011

Mistermel      9 hours ago

DAY 14 SINCE KHAJEEL WAS BRUTUALLY MURDERED AND THE POLICE STILL HAVE NOT REVEAL THE NAME OF THE SUSPECT.

vhpy and 3 more liked this

EDITORIAL – Where is McKenzie’s plan for the city?

Published: Thursday | July 14, 2011

Mistermel      9 hours ago

Where there is corruption there will be blight.

Cops know best in naming persons of interest – Llewellyn

Published: Friday | July 15, 2011

Mistermel      17 hours ago

If the Director of Public Prosecutions is going to defend the police action of not releasing the X6 suspect’s name she should tell us on what legal grounds they are doing so. Her explanation is very simplistic and something you would expect from a non-legal person and not someone who is the public prosecutor.  At least the Commissioner has attempted to give us a dubious legal excuse. But he is not a legal expert and might not be giving a valid reason. As I posted in a previous news report in today’s paper, we need to know if this suspect has dual citizenship and how does dual citizenship makes this case different from any other case? This is what I would expect the Public Prosecutor to tell us.

     vhpy and 15 more liked this Like ReplyReply

ESTEBANAGOSTOREID777      12 hours ago in reply to Mistermel

So true !! So true !!

     vhpy liked this Like ReplyReply

Mistermel      17 hours ago

The Director of Public Prosecutions has been amazingly silent on the BMW X6 case. I thought her office would be resolutely working withe the police to prosecute this case. Instead here she is raising her voice about a secondary matter.

     ESTEBANAGOSTOREID777 and 13 more liked this Like ReplyReply

Mistermel      17 hours ago

DAY 15 SINCE KHAJEEL WAS BRUTUALLY MURDERED AND THE POLICE STILL HAVE NOT REVEALED THE NAME OF THE SUSPECT.

     ESTEBANAGOSTOREID777 and 11 more liked this

ESTEBANAGOSTOREID777      12 hours ago

” Cops know best ” This is so trite and hackneyed !! Indeed, a total bankruptcy of ideas and solutions to a major problem of glaring class and social proportions.

     vhpy and 4 more liked this Like ReplyReply

This is very true and it is one reason why the country cannot make any progress. We have people in positions of influence and power that don’t seems to have any substance and real clout in getting things done. When they talk their ideas are simplistic. You cannot solve the serious problems with simplistic ideas. You have to have creative ideas and the communication skills to initiate those ideas to effect real changes. Another reason why people in position of power and influence ar ineffective is that ther is simple too much corruption.

     vhpy and 2 more liked this Like ReplyReply

They got to the top via a corrupt process; no change can be made that way. They accept the “baton” and carry on.

     vhpy and 3 more liked this Like ReplyReply

ESTEBANAGOSTOREID777      9 hours ago in reply to Mistermel

Ditto !! Ditto !! Ditto !!

     vhpy and 1 more liked this

Interception Act amended

Published: Friday | July 15, 2011

Mistermel      17 hours ago

This issue has become the top priority for the new justice minister that it makes you wonder if this is another effort to assist Dudus in his fight in the US court.

7 people liked this.

EDITORIAL – Another matter to address, Mr Ellington

Published: Friday | July 15, 2011

Mistermel      17 hours ago

The Commissioner is using the justification for not releasing the suspect’s name because he is a citizen of a foreign country.  The question I have is this a Jamaican man with dual citizenship? And if so why would his foreign citizenship pre-empts is Jamaican citizenship in giving him special judicial privileges. If the Commissioner is on solid grounds with his justification then I believe that there are some serious issues with respect to prosecuting foreign citizens in Jamaica. I don’t believe he is on solid ground here because I know that foreign citizens who don’t even hold dual citizenship has been prosecuted for criminal offences in Jamaica.  The media should investigate the Commissioners claim to see if his justification for not releasing the suspect’s name is valid.

     ESTEBANAGOSTOREID777 and 8 more liked this 

media to investigate.. dont hold your breath.. the media only publish press releases.. there are no investigative reporters

BMW X6 driver to face ID parade this week

2011-07-17 11:10:30 | (14 Comments)

Janet Silvera,Senior Gleaner Writer

Despite overwhelming evidence against this suspect his name has not been released to the public and he has not been charged with any crime. This is outrageous and is grossly inconsistent with the way in which police treat suspects especially those who don’t have access to powerful people. And the media is not any better for not providing any information. Surely they know how to ferret out information and how to report this information without jeopardizing the case.  
 
We don’t know if this suspect is Jamaican with foreign citizenship or if he is a foreigner living in Jamaica. Based on what the Commissioner has told the public it appears that he is a foreigner living in Jamaica. If this is not the case and he is a Jamaican with dual citizenship then there are serious issues that do not justify the police not releasing his name.  
It appears to me and to many other Jamaicans that there are powerful sources protecting this man and setting strategy to subvert justice. This conclusion is based on all the unprecedented excuses and the manner in which the police are dealing with this case. Now they are going to hold an Identification parade to establish supposedly if he was the driver of the X6 and if he was the shooter. The only witness that can identify him is the taxi driver. What the police should be doing is to offer this taxi driver protection because if he is the only witness then his life could be in danger. If he is killed or missing then the X6 suspect walks. This is disturbing, very disturbing that that this possibility exists.  
 
If a Jamaican citizen had killed an American youth his name and picture would be all over the media. Furthermore, the media would crucify him and label him as an evil barbarian. But the Jamaican justice system and the media is too beholden to corruption and people of influence and power to carry out their sworn duties without prejudice and bias. This is disgraceful, shameful and a travesty for fairness and justice.  

Today, 2:25:52 PM

Mistermel

DAY 17 SINCE KHAJEEL WAS BRUTUALLY MURDERED AND THE POLICE STILL HAVE NOT REVEALED THE NAME OF THE SUSPECT.

Today, 2:27:24 PM

Attorney General worked as Golding’s lawyer

Published: Sunday | July 17, 2011 23 Comments

Gary Spaulding, Senior Gleaner Writer

Mistermel      7 hours ago

Seems like there is a conflict of interest here. But then this is the way Bruce Golding operates. When the public hollered for a COE in the Dudus cas, he picked a lawyer who represented the JLP and I believe represented him previously. And he even went further than picking the Chairman of the COE he set the terms of reference. God help Jamaiac from this corruption and deceit.

1 person liked this

We must change ‘culture of death’

Published: Sunday | July 17, 2011

Mistermel      14 hours ago

I hate to say this here but no real social change will occur until we change the culture of corruption. It is corruption that is the root of all the evils in Jamaica and this corruption has contaminated all the politicia, social and economic institutions. The society has become too materialistic and as a result spiritual values have been neglected and replaced with negative values like greed, selfishness, and envy.

8 people liked this

MURDEROUS! More than 1,500 children and teenagers killed since 2001

Published: Sunday | July 17, 201

Tyrone Reid, Sunday Gleaner Reporter

Mistermel      6 hours ago

We live in a corupt society where the law makers protect dons and thugs but ignore the plight of helpless children. For every politician who protects a don or who work with them and do nothing to help the children that have been victimized by crime the blood of these innocent children is on their hands.

Publisher has advice for JLP affiliate group G2K

2011-07-19 10:39:46

The media has a right to critize any political entity and any attempt to change this unwise and unconstitutional. If the young turks want to find an issue they can build on it is that of transforming the political system that is chronically corrupt. Personally I think the Bruce Goilding administration deserves all the criticism it can get from the media. This also applies to the Opposition party which is no different from the Golding’s party. So my suggestion to the young turks is if they can’t find a better issue to help build Jamaica and change it from a corrupt culture then they should go fly a kite.

Today, 6:24:38 PM

TrevDiMan

Guest

Be fair to politicians, Vaz tells media

Published: Tuesday | July 19, 2011

Mistermel      15 hours ago

The media has been more than fair to a group of people who have been labeled as gangs and who operate in a political system that is rife with corruption. These people are corrupt and they have not been fair to themselves, their families and the Jamaican people. These corrupt politicians should follow the Golden Rule – treat others fairly and they will treat you fairly.

Jongfellow and 5 more liked this

On to London – Jamaica closes Daegu World Champs in style

Published: Monday | September 5, 2011

Mistermel      12 hours ago

While Jamaican athletes have traditionally done well in international meet to bring honor and recognition to Jamaica the same cannot be said for our politicans who have bring nothing but dishonour and disgrace to Jamaica. Our politicians while they are quick to bask in the succsses of our athletes need to do their share of work to make Jamaica a better place for people to live in peace and safety. It is time for our politicians to set high standards for themselves and to win their own gold medals in the political arena so that Jamaica can make the progress it deserves. 

(Edited by a moderator)

Probe Dudus here – PNP pushes case but cop ponders whether Coke can be charged locally

Published: Wednesday | September 7, 2011

Mistermel      1 day ago

It appears to me that the PNP is pushing for the local prosecution of Dudus for political purposes and nothing more. If this is the case such efforts never seems to amount to any real value or advantage to the country. If the PNP really want to use the Dudus case as a catalyst for change they should instead advocate measures to eliminate the corruption in the political system. This would be of much greater value to the country than simply prosecuting Dudus and sending him to prison. Both the government and the opposition should start a non-partisan effort to end the systemic political corruption that produced people like Dudus.

(Edited by a moderator)

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Jaybird

Byoy oh Byoy, duppy really know who fe frighten. How come the PM can’t lash out at the ruthless gunmen that are killing and terrorizing people but she can lash out at a senile old man who lives thousands of miles away from JA.