JAMAICA OBSERVER TALK BACK POSTS (May to December 2010)

JAMAICA OBSERVER TALK BACK POSTS (May to December  2010).

These posts were made using the pseudonym David Armstrong.

We won’t back down’

Pastors vow to continue peace efforts despite killing of colleague

BY NADINE WILSON Observer staff reporter wilsonn@jamaicaobserver.com

Monday, May 03, 2010

David Armstrong
5/3/2010

Kudos to the members of the Spanish Town Ministers’ Fraternal for organizing this march. This is what more Jamaicans need to do to show that the brutal killings of innocent people will not be tolerated. Jamaicans should also consider peaceful demonstrations at Gordon House so that the government can feel some of the heat. Applying pressure and demanding that they do their job of protecting the public health and safety will get some action from them. There is strength in unity and so Jamaicans must unite to and become more proactive in the effort to rid society of the barbarians who are committing demonic murders of innocent and vulnerable people. This proactive effort must include exposing the barbaric vermins to the police, exposing corrupt cops, and exposing politicians who associate with government. Jamaicans who have the financial resources and influences can do this by placing anonymous ads in the newspapers.

5-year-old boy found with throat slashed

BY COREY ROBINSON Observer staff reporter robinsonc@jamaicaobserver.com

Monday, May 03, 2010

David Armstrong
5/3/2010

The demonic forces of evil have been unleasehed on Jamaica. When a society ignore spiritual principles it becomes corrupt and uncaring. Jamaica has become a jungle society where only the strong survive. The strong are the corrupt politicians and the criminal thugs with their guns.

‘Dudus’ may be the most powerful man in Ja, says Phillips

BY KARYL WALKER Online editor walkerk@jamaicaobserver.com

Sunday, May 09, 2010

David Armstrong
5/9/2010

What does it say about a country, about the government, and about the two political parties when the most powerful man is wanted for serious crimes and is a don with connections to the highest level the ruling government party? Both political parties over the years have retained dons as a kind of war lord who oversees their garrison constituencies. As a result of this disturbing practice corruption is endemic and lawlessness is pervasive. These social problems in turn manifest themselves in the indiscipline we see throughout the society and the heinous killings that are occurring too frequently.
Many Jamaicans have suggested various solutions to fix the violent crime and corruption problems in Jamaica. I would like to suggest that to fix these problems the root cause of the problem must be conclusively established by an independent and authoritative body. Once the root cause is established the country must work to eradicate the 

problem. What I am suggesting is that a TRUTH AND RECONCILLIATION COMMISSION (similar to what South Africa did some years ago to avoid a blood bath) be established to investigate the relationship between politicians and dons. I believe the Governor General has the power and authority to call for this commission. This commission would not be beholden to any political party and would in my opinion do a lot to expose and help dismantle this system that has contributed to escalation of violent crime in Jamaica over the years.

Ricky Trooper under US probe

BY INVESTIGATIVE COVERAGE UNIT

Sunday, May 09, 2010

David Armstrong
5/9/2010

What else is new? These dancehall musicans promote violence and and are worshipped by many Jamaicans. Some are even seen as cultural icons based on the publicity and influene they have on young folks. It is not surprising that these musicians thrive in a society and culture that has become degenearte and plagued with violent crime.

‘I’ve nothing more to say’

PM evades questions re ‘Dudus’ affair

JamaicaObserver.com

Wednesday, May 12, 2010

David Armstrong
5/12/2010

You have nothing more to say Mr. Prime Minister? You have lost all credibility and integrity as a political leader and now you are demonstrating your arrogance. The Dudus issue is not closed and you are the main reason why this rotten case is still casting its stinking odor over the country. How can you say you have nothing more to say when this issue is still pending a resolution from your office. When a leader has lost his/her credibility or integrity they are not able to govern with clear vision, conviction and wisdom. Consequently, the violent crimes, indiscipline, and corruption continue to destroy the country like termites eating away at a building.

Adams warns of mayhem if ‘Dudus’ case goes to court

BY PAUL HENRY Observer staff reporter henryp@jamaicaobserver.com

Saturday, May 15, 2010

David Armstrong
5/15/2010

Mr. Adams is not saying anything new here. Ofcourse it will be a maximum security issue if Dudus is extradited. Is he saying that Jamaica don’t have the resources to provide this maximum security? I don’t believe that a combined fully deployed military and police unit could not contain any such disturbances that would arise. Am I to understand if another island was to invade Jamaica the country would not be able to defend itself?

If Jamaica don’t have the resources to defend against a Dudus backlash, then maybe the government should request the US send National Guards (civilians who provide military duty in times of national disaster or emergency).

PM in crisis talks

Saturday, May 15, 2010

David Armstrong
5/15/2010

This Dudusgate mess is the opportunity for the government and Jamaicans to clean up the corruption and various social ills damaging the country. The PM has two options that that will help to take advantage of the opportunity:
1) Do the right thing and resign
2) Make a decision on the Dudus case now. Either allow the extradition to go forward or stop prolonging this matter.
If he fails to do the above then all Jamaicans with any common sense should force him to do so. We cannot allow Jamiaca to be governed by corruption, lies, and unethical behaviour (their association with criminal elements of the society). As a result of these influences all Jamaicans are being adversely affected (some have been savagely murdered). Whether you are PNP, JLP, or whatever other political creed you subscribe to you have a right to have good governance of your country.

Apologise, Bruce!

JCC says PM has lost its respect and confidence

Sunday, May 16, 2010

David Armstrong
5/16/2010

Calling all jamaicans to unite for the good of their country. The PM has brought this whole mess because of his lack of leadership, lack of courage, and lack of political common sense. This issue is not about PNP or JLP and it is not about America. In fact America’s role in Dudusgate is a secondary issue. The primary issue here is the evil and unethical connection between the dons and the politicians (yes PNP and JLP). They are a bunch of selfish egostical and unethical people who have no principles and integrity. They have allowed the subculture of criminals and Dancehall morons to influence and corrupt young Jamaicans.

EDITORIAL

The gig is up, Prime Minister

Sunday, May 16, 2010

David Armstrong
5/16/2010

Not only must the PM resign the whole evil and corrupt system between dons and politicians must be eradicated immediately. New statutes are required to prevent politicians from having any ties to criminals. Any perwson aspiring to political office must be vetted to make sure they have no such ties. If they do then they cannot seek political office. Yes we have to get tough to weed out this corruption and evil that is like a cancer that is metastizing.
This is not the time for Jamaicans to play the trivial politics game of PNP vs JLP. This is about the future of Jamaica. No Jamaicans in his or her right mind should tolerate or condone this evil relationship between politicians and dons. It is a shame and disgrace that we have politicians protecting and associating with people who have not

made a positive and uplifting contribution towards the betterment of Jamaica.

David Armstrong
5/16/2010

Here we have delegates calling themselves “Shower delegates” at at the PM’s crisis meeting. I hope they have no connection to the notorious Shower Posse. Why would they use such a name and trying to use intimidating tactics to suggest that the PM will not resign.

‘Give the full, stinking truth, PM’

No nation can move ahead without truth, says pastor

BY PAUL HENRY Sunday Observer staff reporter henryp@jamaicaobserver.com

Sunday, May 16, 2010

David Armstrong
5/16/2010

the only way the truth is going to come out is if a commission of inquiry is set up. I suggested recently that the GG should call for a Truth and Reconcilliation Commission. The objectives of this commission should be to investigate the connections of politicians with dons and make recommendations that would dismantle this evil system. This connection is a serious problem that has contributed to the pervasive corruption and escalation of crime in Jamaica. The PM, the JLP and the PNP politicians are unable to dismantle this don connection becaus ethey are too entrenched in this system.

We are Jamaicans… Not PNP or JLP

Sunday, May 16, 2010

David Armstrong
5/16/2010

This is a good approach to get citizens to provided their assesment on their MPs or political representatives. We now live in age that provides easy access to information and news – the internet. Through this medium we can get information to evaluate any public official. I would suggest that the Observer make public the officila e-mail address of all MPs so that jamaicans at home and overseas can provide feedback to them

Phillips underlines PNP’s unity and readiness for elections

BY GARFIELD MYERS Editor-at-Large South/Central Bureau myersg@jamaicaobserver

Monday, May 17, 2010

David Armstrong
5/17/2010

Before any political party starts talking about governing Jamaica or positioning itself for an election, they must denounce their past and present adulturous affairs with dons and pledge to the jamaican people that they will dismantle this evil practice. As long as this adulturous affair continues no party is fit to govern the country. So Mr.

Phillips or Ms. Portia Simpson do the right thing and take the moral high ground. This is your big opportunity to enhance your political career, your spiritual development, and to do a world of good for Jamaica.

Bruce defiant – PM, JLP see no need for resignation

BY PAUL HENRY Observer staff reporter henryp@jamaicaobserver.com

Monday, May 17, 2010

David Armstrong
5/17/2010

Since the PM has chosen not to resign Is the Jamaican parliament going to censure him? Just asking since I hear no one raising this issue.

David Armstrong
5/17/2010

The PM by his decision not to resign and his statement that he sees no need to resign is an indication that he does not recognize the egregious nature of his behavior with regards to his handling of the Dudus issue. It is one thing for a head of state to blatantly lie but when that lie involve actions to protect a man of ill repute and alleged criminal conduct then that is a very serious matter. This whole Dudusgate matter has provided irrefutable evidence of the extent to which politicians have been corrupted by their connection with criminals and undesirable persons. The political system is infested with maggots and this is why the PM, the government, the opposition party have not been successful in controlling the growing problem.
If Jamaicans accept the PM non-chalant comment that he sees no reason to resign then they will have no one to blame but themselves when violent crimes continue to spiral out of control. This is an opportunity to purge the political system that has been corrupted by unworthy politicians and the criminals they associate with. Jamaicans must demand this because the PM has been rendered impotent by his connections to Dudus to implement strong actions to purge the system.
Since the PM chooses not to resign is he going to tell the nation what his plans are with respect to fighting crime? Is he going to denounce his relationship with Dudus and initiate measures to eradicate this unhealthy political association? If he wants to remain as PM he has to do something now, it can’t be business as usual.

A time for good men and women to stand up

Monday, May 17, 2010

David Armstrong
5/17/2010

Mr. Editor these men have no honor, no principles, and no integrity. They don’t care about the country or the lives of people. They have failed to recognize the eggregious nature of the problem by the dumb statements they continue to make. You are right comparing their sins to the past sins of the PNP or even to the USA is not the issue here. Sensible Jamaicans know that this Dudusgate issue is not a PNP or JLP issue. It is a national political issue because it irrefutable shows that the whole political system is corrupt by virtue of its connection to dons and people of illrepute.
Jamaicans must not back away from this issue they must demand that the PM step down because he is cast a dark shadow over the political institution that is entrusted with the governance of the country.

PM says sorry

Portia rejects PM’s apology

David Armstrong
5/18/2010

I listened to the PM’s address on internet radio and what I heard was a man who sounded very sincere and contrite. Like many Jamaicans posting comments here I posted several comments calling for his resignation and for specific actions to be taken. Based on what I heard I have decided to accept his decision not to resign. In light of the egregious nature of this sordid Dudus affair has exposed, I still think that parliament should censure the PM. No one is perfect and we all make mistakes from time to time. What is important is that we recognize the mistakes we make and take steps to correct them. Mr. Golding in speech has indicated he recognized his mistakes and that he is willing to take steps to restore the trust previously placed in him.
I believe that sometimes when we face serious problems that points to flaws in our character or integrity we can become a better person if we recognize the flaws and take steps to correct. To put it another way when we hurt someone that trusted you and you seek forgiveness in a sincere way then you also become a better person. Like pig iron that is smelted in the high temperature of the blast furnace to produced refined stainless steel, Mr. Golding has been refined in the whole Dudus blast furnace experience. This I believe will make him a stronger and better leader. Of course only time will tell. He must now seek to implement laws and policies that will dismantle the garrison politics once and for all. I believe we should give him chance to do so.

‘Dudus’ extradition process to begin

Tuesday, May 18, 2010

David Armstrong
5/18/2010

This should have been done from the begining. However, I am glad that this Dudusgate (as I like to refer to it) played out this way. Why it exposed the dirty underbelly of garrison politics, the connections of dons with politicians, and corruption. In essence it was a blessing in disguise because I believe that Jamaicans including maybe some politicians are now aware that they cannot have these evil ties with criminal elements and continue to be servants of the jamaican people. I certainly will do everything I possible can to make sure that this evil system is cleaned up.

EDITORIAL

Mr Golding’s chance to redeem himself

Tuesday, May 18, 2010

David Armstrong
5/18/2010

I concur with this editorial and congratulate the Editor for his candid editorials addressing the Dudus affair. This is the type of journalism that will help make Jamaica better. When news orgnization speak truth to power it makes democracy stronger.

Panic as report about ‘Dudus’ extradition circulates

BY KIMMO MATTHEWS Observer staff reporter matthewsk@jamaicaobserver.com

Tuesday, May 18, 2010

David Armstrong
5/18/2010

Any politician who feels they are indebted to a don or a person of ill repute should resign. To make the argument that Dudus has done a lot of good for his party and his community is simplistic and just wrong. There is no good that can come out of any relationship that involves immoral and unlawful behaviour. We cannot afford to let criminals and undereducated people influence culture and bring us down to their level. It must be the other way around. Criminals and undereducated people must strive to become better citezens.

Politicians send cops ‘subtle’ no-patrol-zone messages, says Adams

BY PAUL HENRY Observer staff reporter henryp@jamaicaobserver.com

Tuesday, May 18, 2010

David Armstrong
5/18/2010

This hands-off policy for garrison constituency was in effect for Tivoli Garden when Mr. Seaga was PM. In fact TG was one of the original garrison constituency. Criminals and dons were given protected for the support they gave to political representatives then. So while we are in the mood of calling for apologies we should be calling for an apology from Mr. Seaga..the Godfather …you guess it.

Any politician who inteferes with police work should be arrested. We need laws to give police the power to do so. Jamaica cannot afford to let these kind of practices damage the country ad prevent it from making progress. Police officers should have the authority to perform their duties within the framework prescribed by the laws.

US Pleased – ‘Dudus’ move an important first step

State Dept says ‘Dudus’ move an important first step

BY HAROLD G BAILEY Observer writer editorial@jamaicaobserver.com

Wednesday, May 19, 2010

David Armstrong
5/19/2010

The argument that US citizens who committed illegal acts against foreign countries are not extradited to those countries to stand trial does not justify the non-extradition of Dudus. As I said in previous comments, this extradition request for Dudus is a blessing in disguise for Jamaica. It is the catalyst that will start the reaction to dismantling the garrison districts and the connections that politicians have with criminals.
Both political parties and Jamaicans have allowed the criminals in garrison constituents to influence political decisions for too long. This has contributed to the lawlessness plaguing the country as evidenced by the heinous murders that are occurring too frequently.
The Jamaican Diaspora has played a strong role in making their voices heard on the Dudus issue. We are putting politicians on notice that they cannot conduct business as usual with criminals. We will use our power to mobilize

opposition against them and force them out of office.

Magar Boy
5/19/2010

@ David Armstrong
Couldnt agree with you anymore. Oh I wish the US would have as many of these for a want of better term unethical people off our shores. I am convinced the Polititians have no desire in curbing crime. If I were in charge of this country I would supply the US government with some more names of people who are wreaking havoc in this country. Since we cant deal with them and somebody else is willing I say power to them. Oh I wish for the day when I will have peace in this country,

Arrest warrant out for ‘Dudus‘; Tavares-Finson withdraws

Wednesday, May 19, 2010

David Armstrong
5/19/2010

The argument that US citizens who committed illegal acts against foreign countries are not extradited to those countries to stand trial does not justify the non-extradition of Dudus. As I said in previous comments, this extradition request for Dudus is a blessing in disguise for Jamaica. It is the catalyst that will start the reaction to dismantling the garrison districts and the connections that politicians have with criminals.
Both political parties and Jamaicans have allowed the criminals in garrison constituents to influence political decisions for too long. This has contributed to the lawlessness plaguing the country as evidenced by the heinous murders that are occurring too frequently.
The Jamaican Diaspora has played a strong role in making their voices heard on the Dudus issue. We are putting politicians on notice that they cannot conduct business as usual with criminals. We will use our power to mobilize opposition against them and force them out of office.

PM’s actions could prejudice extradition case

— Phillips

Wednesday, May 19, 2010

David Armstrong
5/19/2010

Peter Phillips deserves credit for his relentless actions in parliament that opened a can of worms for the PM. I am disappointed though that he and his party instead of over reacting like a petulant child has not seized on the opportunity to take the moral high ground. This was their opportunity to denounce political ties to criminals and to initiate actions to dismantle garrison constituency. I understand why they might have been reluctant to do this but there comes a time when you have be courageous and have to take tactical risks to enhance your position. It is not too late for them to do these things.

My advice to Mr. Phillips and the PNP leaders is that they should not try to complicate the Dudus extradition process by making unnecessary statements for political gains. The matter as it stands is already confusing and controversial because of the political involvement of the government or the JLP executives (as they have suggested). This was a simple extradition case but because of the actors involved in this mystery suspense drama it became a blockbuster real life play.

Take charge of Tivoli, Portia urges PM

Thursday, May 20, 2010

David Armstrong
5/20/2010

Both JLP and PNP political leaders should realize that when issues like the Dudus affair threaten the stability of an area or the country they should stop playing politics and try to resolve the problem in a non partisan way. Making statements to score political points serves no useful purpose and in fact only help to compound the issue. The PM and the JLP leaders have caused this whole mess but now is not the time to beat up on them in a way that is not constructive and does not provide clear and specific solutions.
The Dudus affair is a manifestation of the political corruption that evolved from the ties with politicians and dons and the garrison constituents this tie created. Both JLP and PNP politicians are benefactors of this evil and corrupt system. The process for dismantling this system must be implemented now. The PM in his address asked for forgiveness and making amends. To start dismantling the political garrison and purge the corruption from the political system all politicians who have been involve with dons and who have garrison constituency must denounce this evil and begin making amends. This is what Jamaicans should expect now from the rank and file of both political parties.

Lawyers file suit to block Coke’s extradition

BY PAUL HENRY Observer staff reporter henryp@jamaicaobserver.com

Thursday, May 20, 2010

David Armstrong
5/20/2010

Any motion to block the extradition should be overturned. Who is retaining these lawyers to do this? Is it Dudus and if so are these lawyers so greedy and without any morals that they want money gained from corruption crime. They should be disbarred.

Brooklyn Jamaican
5/20/2010

Mr Armstrong. I am 1000% percent against Dudus, but everyone deserves representation under the law. He is lucky, in Mexico or Columbia they would plant him on a Private plane and drop him off in Miami

Human shields in Tivoli

‘Dudus’ supporters fire first volley in show of defiance

Thursday, May 20, 2010

David Armstrong
5/20/2010

This talk about civil war and blood bath in Jamaica over the Dudus affair is just pure nonsense. A civil war requires a charismatic leader who can mobilize grass roots support to sacrifice their life for an ideological, social or political cause. History shows us that countries that experienced civil wars had leaders who were not only charismatic but were military strategist and were not cowards. Dudus does not fit the bill as such a leader. He is just a common thug who controls other thugs and undereducated people like himself. Sure there may be some bloodshed by these thugs who are accustom to killing even when there is no social disturbance. If Dudus had any sense he could take advantage of this opportunity to redeem himself and make himself a better person by giving himself up. He could do this by going on TV or radio and also make an appeal to his followers to be calm. Surely, he must realize that his life will not be the same and he will not be allowed to have any more connections to politicians under the existing conditions. I don’t think Dudus is smart enough and courageous enough to do any of the things that I am suggesting here. For all I know he is probably under some rock hiding.

Tivoli Gardens not untouchable, says top cop

Police taking strategic approach to community

JamaicaObserver.com

Friday, May 21, 2010

David Armstrong
5/21/2010

Dudus was next to God..I think they mean Bruce. Well Bruce cannot defend Dudus anymore because he is busy trying to defend himself from those who are not satisfied that he has come clean on this issue. No area in Jamaica should be untouchable with respect to law enforcement. Any politician including the PM who intefere with the police performing their duties should be arrested. Jamaica simplke cannot afford politicians or anyone to be above the law. This kind of practice nutures corruption and is the reason the country is now at this sickening point.

Private sector demands more from Bruce after Manatt

JamaicaObserver.com

Friday, May 21, 2010

David Armstrong
5/21/2010

This doesn’t make sense to me…how can Dorothy Lightbourne be a senator, attorney general, and Minister of Justice at the same time. Shouldn’t all these high level positions positions be independent of each other? And another thing that is perplexing…hoe can Tom Tavares-Finson be a senator and was able to be Dudus lawer at the same time? Can someone please shed some ligt on these matters? Seems like there is a lot of conflict here and part of the reason why so much corruption and unethical behaviour exist within the government.

Willing to die for ‘Dudus’

West Kgn residents show strong support for Tivoli don

Friday, May 21, 2010

David Armstrong
5/21/2010

This kind of demonstration can only happen in a society where people have no respect for the law. In a society where law and order is respected people do not go out in the streets and show their support for a person who is allegedly involved in criminal activities. These types of demonstration occur simple because dons are treated as folk heroes, called community leaders and are beholden to politicians. This is how Tom Tavares-Finson, Dudus former lawyer who is also a senator representing the governing party, describes Dudus: “He is a father, legitimate businessman and community leader, not a hardened gang leader.” Other high level politicans also use the term community leader to desribe dons who operate in the garrison constituencies as if it gives the dons some kind of ligitimacy. Is it a surprise then that we see these types of demonstrations? The police should not allow these types of demonstration to occur.

Ronald Robinson resigns as senator, junior minister

Friday, May 21, 2010

David Armstrong
5/21/2010

According to a Washington Post article published April 16, 2010, Attorneys from Manatt Phelps & Phillips had at least six contacts with Obama administration officials that included a Jamaican minister. That official if it is not Dr. Robinson should come forward and do the following: apologize and/or resign.

COLUMNS

Two-faced Golding, vile senators, a corrupt state

Franklin Johnston

David Armstrong
5/21/2010

Thanks for this article Mr. Johnston. Jamaicans have to take back their country from the thugs and corrupt politicians who are destroying it. The jamaican diaspora with the aid of the information technology media has been left right

and center on Dudusgate. We have the information and resources to obtain information and to expose corrupt politicians and public officials. All Jamaicans must call out these corrupt people when their corrupt actions are known.

Musical chairs in the Senate

With Alicia Dunkley

Sunday, May 23, 2010

David Armstrong
5/23/2010

I am confused as to how some senators seems to hold multiple positions and are allowed to conduct their personal business at the same time. For example Senator Dorothy Lightbourne has four official government titles: Attorney General, Minister of Justice, Leader of Government Business, and Senator. Section 79, item 3 of the Jamaica (Constitution) Order in Council 1962 reads as follows:
“Any person appointed to hold or act in the office of Attorney-General in pursuance of subsection (2) of this section shall not, except in accordance with the provisions of section 70 of this Constitution, be appointed a Minister.”
Section 70 of the Constitution does not seem to provide a clear exception to Dorothy Lightbourne holding the position of Attorney General and minister of Justice. One would think that all the positions she hold should be independent of each other. Also, how is it that Tom Tavares-Finson as an active senator was able was able to be Dudus lawyer at the same time?

Gunmen push up murder toll in St Catherine

BY COREY ROBINSON Observer staff reporter robinsonc@jamaicaobserver.com

Wednesday, May 26, 2010

David Armstrong
5/26/2010

Here is another one of my “crazy” suggestion: The government should quickly implement an emergency fund to encourage people to provide information leading to arrest and conviction of those responsible for the murderous act. They should be convicted on capital murder charge and breach against national security then executed immediately. To let the thugs know that their lawlessness can no longer be tolerated drastic actions must be taken. Jamaica must do what some of the muslims countries and other countries have done to prevent violent crime.
Where is the government to get the money from to fund this program? Jamaicans, private organizations/business, seizing the assets of known criminals like Dudus. I will donate a $500.

Post Tivoli: ‘Tis the worst… and best of times

Thursday, May 27, 2010

David Armstrong
5/27/2010

Your Charles Dickens quote “The best and worst of times” from his classic book “A Tale of Two Cities” is appropriate for Jamaica at this time. We have two men in Jamaica today who epitomizes Dickensonian quote. Christopher “Dudus” Coke has brought the worst of times for Jamaica. He has epitomizes everything that is bad for Jamaica

today and has managed to bring shame and notorierity at the international level. Usain Bolt has brought fame and glory to Jamaica by his athletic accomplish and represents everything that is good for Jamaica.

EDITORIAL

A crisis is a terrible thing to waste

Wednesday, June 09, 2010

David Armstrong
6/9/2010

Yes indeed, it seems like the two inept parties that form the government and the opposition are going to continue as if it is business as usual. Despite the damaging fallout from the Dudus saga which has exposed all kinds of problems within the political system and society no relevant legislation or evaluation (such as a inquiry) is in progress to deter or provide guidance on these problems. This means that root cause (politicians in bed with dons and thugs) will continue…what a disgrace.

JLP lawyers denied entry into Tivoli Gardens

BY ERICA VIRTUE Observer Writer virtuee@jamaicaobserver.com

Wednesday, June 09, 2010

David Armstrong
6/9/2010

“He said their reason for seeking access was to interview individuals, including some who had been detained and released.”
So it appears that Mr. Tavares-Finson is performing private service as a lawyer. If this is not the case why does he want to interview individuals in TG. He is not the MP for TG and his senatorial responsibility has nothing to do with what is going on in TG.

EDITORIAL

Is it possible to ‘take back Jamaica?’

David Armstrong
6/10/2010

Jamaica can only be taken back when the corrupt political system is cleaned up. Cleaning this up will be a major challenge as both political parties are deeply entrenched in it. When the political system is corrupt it affects every facet of the society and prevents the country from making real progress. I am afraid that this challenge might not be met because we have a situation of the foxes guarding the hen house. The question then is how do you replace the foxes or change their behaviour.

george watson
6/10/2010

Excellent post Bhingi dread. In the U.S. (a country which we admire) the newspapers would be down on this story in a flash, even before the government agencies which are in place for this sort of thing. And David Armstrong it is not only the politicians who are corrupt, it is all of us, but the politicians are the most visible ones. The businessmen are not very far behind.
Even when we have structures in place we don’t follow them.
Another newspaper pointed out that the assets of gangsters are not being confiscated although legislation is in place for this.
Don’t the politicians read these posts? Don’t they even care? And this is from a government who promised openness and no corruption

Tavares-Finson calls for greater media access to Tivoli

BY ERICA VIRTUE Observer writer virtuee@jamaicaobserver.com

Thursday, June 10, 2010

David Armstrong
6/10/2010

When privileged people like Mr. Tavares Finson gets their privilege taken away from them they fume and complain like he is doing now. As an attorney he should understand that in a state of emergency restrictions on who can or cannot access the area under the state of emergency is normal. Considering his past relationship with the Dudus he is the last person that should be seeking access to TG. And by the way he does not have the moral or ethical authority to make statements such as “…a betrayal to the people of the community and of Jamaica” or “it was a shame that their request had been denied.” This is the same man who said that Dudus is a father, legitimate businessman and community leader, not a hardened gang leader. Isn’t this a shame and betrayal to Jamaicans to be making such statements about a man who is the head of the Shower posses and who is a don.

David Armstrong
6/10/2010

Chuck I have asked the same questions about him being a senator and still functioning as a private lawyer. This seems like a major conflict with respect to his responsibilities as a legislator and his private practice. Maybe the constitution allows this kind of thing. If so I think it should be amended to prevent this.

Chuck Emanuel
6/10/2010

In my view, Attorney Tavares Finson should be ignored for the very fact that he is in conflict of interest against the Jamaican State.
How is it that a member of Parliament is allowed to advise the Government against extradition, collects a government salary, represents an alleged narco-trafficker and gun-runner who is on the most wanted list of the U.S. with a pending extradition request ?
Who does this Attorney really represent as amember of Parliament ?

Anti-crime Bills debate to continue next week

BY ALICIA DUNKLEY Observer staff reporter dunkleya@jamaicaobserver.com

Thursday, June 10, 2010

David Armstrong
6/10/2010

The anti-crime bill does not include any provision to fix the main problem that is the source of the social, economic, and political problems in Jamaica. That source is the corruption of the political system resulting from the garrison constituency system and the association of politicians with dons/thugs. The anti-crime bill should include a provision to impeach a MP or other public official with such ties. There are also other creative things that can be done to fix the corruption problem.

COLUMNS

Edward Seaga: Deification of a demigod

BY URIAH KING

David Armstrong
6/18/2010

I do not believe that racism is a problem in Jamaica but I do believe that Jamaicans have inherited a color consciousness from the legacy of colonialism. This color consciousness has affected black Jamaicans who tend to see other Jamaicans who are of a non-black extraction (especially white) as privileged and in some cases superior to them. This seems to be even pronounced if the non-black Jamaican holds some position of authority or power over them. People such as the Manleys (father and son), Bustamante, and Mr. Seaga are good examples of non-black Jamaicans who have been deified by black Jamaicans. I could not resist expressing this viewpoint when I read the last paragraph of this article.
Sometimes the deification of a person can result in arrogance and abuse of power if they have it. I believe this has been the case with Mr. Seaga during his tenure of political leadership. History has show that such people who hold political leadership create more problems than good.

EDITORIAL

What took you so long, Mr Coke?

Page one editorial

Wednesday, June 23, 2010

David Armstrong
6/23/2010

The capture of Dudus is no guarantee that the end of thug rule over Jamaican communities like Tivoli Gardens and other garrisons will happen. As I said before. Any measure to fight crime and corruption that does not include this provision will be ineffective in fighting corruption and crime. To fight this problem a stake must be driven in the heart that allows it to have life. The heart that allows corruption and crime to have life comes from a political system that

derives benefit from it. This is why the political leadership of both parties are unwilling to drive a stake in the heart of this problem. Since the politicians are unable to do it on their own the initiative to do so must come from sources outside of the political system (Jamaicans, private organizations, religious organizations, etc.).

Sector leaders hail capture of ‘Dudus’

Wednesday, June 23, 2010

David Armstrong
6/23/2010

Are they sure they got the right man? That man doesn’t look like Dudus.

Before Dudus can get forgiveness he must first seek atonement. Atonement is a spiritual concept that requires the acknowledgement of wrong doing. For Dudus to do this he must acknowledge responsibility for any harm or injury he has caused and where possible make amends to victims he has caused harm to. Only when he does these things can the other spiritual concept of forgiveness can be effectively given. The adversity that he is facing is not the end of the world for him. There are plenty of examples where men have done evil things then turn their lives around and start doing good deeds. Dudus can use this experience to turn his life around and who knows become an advocate of fighting crime and corruption in Jamaica.

EDITORIAL

Let’s pray for the backsliders too

David Armstrong
6/25/2010

The Observer is not posting my comments that are critical of the politicians especially those that are a part of the government. This is a shame as these comments add to the debate and hopefully draw attention to to the inept and irresponsible behaviour of public officials.

Why Al went for ‘Dudus’

Pastor says Coke wanted to end stain of violence on his family

BY ALICIA DUNKLEY Observer staff reporter

Monday, June 28, 2010

David Armstrong

6/28/2010

Al Miller is an intermediary for the government. His official government responsibility is a kind of liason officer for social transformation. For this position re reports directly to the PM’s office. You read between the lines on this. I think these people think all Jamaicans are stupid.

EDITORIAL

Looking past the State of Emergency

Monday, June 28, 2010

David Armstrong
6/28/2010

Any long term solution to the problems that Dudusgate caused must start with an independent commission of inquiry. The Jamaica Observer should use its journalistic influence to ensure that this is implemented.

PNP wants ‘Dudus’ to spill the beans

BY ALESIA EDWARDS Observer staff reporter alesiae@jamaicaobserver.com

Monday, June 28, 2010

David Armstrong
6/28/2010

The Dudus affair shook the foundation of the government, exposed corruption at the highest level of government, resulted in the loss of many lives, and had a significant impact on the economy. An effective way of dismantling this corrupt and evil system is to start have an independent commission of inquiry. Dudus spilling the beans is not going to dismantle this problem because any politician he calls out is going to deny their involvement and claim he is not credible because he is only trying to get off leniently.

PM urges G8 to treat crime as a development issue

Tuesday, June 29, 2010

David Armstrong
6/29/2010

The problem of crime in Jamaica is not due to the lack of external help or resources. It is due primarily to the lack of initiative to dismantle the garrison constituencies that the politicians benefit from. Jamaica’s political leaders must dismantle the garrison constituencies if they really want to control crime. A good start in this area is to implement constitutional changes that will impeach public officials who are associated with criminal entities in these garrison constituencies.

EDITORIAL

The real crime lords are the ‘untouchables’

Tuesday, June 29, 2010

David Armstrong
6/29/2010

Yes indeed! the real crime lords are the corrupt people who use their position of privilege, position of authority or power, and wealth to aid and abet the pawns who do their dirty work. Right now in Jamaica these people hold high level political positions and by virtue of this they are untouchable. As long as these untouchables exist jamaica will continue to experience major crime problems and corruption. That is why it is imperative that this political corruption be cleaned up.

Priest knocks selfishness, greed in country

BY ALICIA DUNKLEY Observer staff reporter dunkleya@jamaicaobserver.com

Tuesday, June 29, 2010

David Armstrong
6/29/2010

The monsignor is right. We live in an age of materialism which has instilled a kind of cultural materialism. Everybody – rich and poor – wants more stuff and they believe that this is the only way to achieve happiness and contentment. The problem of acquiring the material stuff is that it requires money ..lots of money if you want an expensive car or a big house. A quick way to get this money is through corruption, robbery, and drugs. All these vices are associated to greed and selfishness.

Police name six as ‘persons of major interest’

Tuesday, June 29, 2010

Excerpt from JA Observer on June 23, 2010.

LEAH Tavares-Finson, the daughter of government senator and former attorney for Christopher ‘Dudus’ Coke, was this morning held at a house in Kintyre, St Andrew during a police operation.

Police report that Lea Tavares-Finson was held with two other men, inside a house in the often volatile community.

The wanted man has been identified as Christopher Linton also called ‘Dog Paw’. Police say Lincoln is the reputed leader of the Dog Paw gang who is suspected of involvement in several serious crimes.

EDITORIAL

Mr Samuda’s confession good for the soul

Wednesday, June 30, 2010

David Armstrong
6/30/2010

This is a good example Mr. Samuda is setting but he needs to take it a step further. As general secretary of his party he should get these principles incorporated into the party’s manifesto. As a high ranking member of the government he should also initiate laws that would allow the impeachment of public officials who are linked to dons or corruption. Actions speak louder than words and actions aimed at reforming the corruption of political system is what I believe all Jamaicans deserve.

Gunmen invade Samuda’s home

Minister’s shotgun, ammunition and US currency stolen

BY PAUL HENRY Observer staff reporter henryp@jamaicaobserever.com

Thursday, July 01, 2010

David Armstrong
7/1/2010

Now that Mr. Samuda knows what it feels like to be violated by criminals I hope this experience will give him the courage to help bring about real changes to dismantle the garrison constituencies and the corruption it wreaks on the political system. Mr. Samuda should not let this experience cower him into fighting crime. His unfortunate experience is perhaps the catalyst that will galvanize him and other politicians into taking a stand to destroy the crime monster that they have been feeding.

EDITORIAL

The blind can’t lead the blind…

David Armstrong
7/2/2010

One of the reason I believe that many Jamaicans have not made better progress in improving the quality of their life is that they tend to have blind faith in people who exploit. Religious leaders and politicians are good example of people who exploit them for their own personal agenda. If many of these exploited Jamaicans could only think for themselves they would see how badly they are being exploited.

Creating a new vision of Jamaica

By Douglas Orane

Friday, July 02, 2010

David Armstrong
7/2/2010

Mr. Orane’s speech to the Rotary Club is indeed visionary. He points out the basic problems and provides the type of solutions that are needed to correct these problems. The only thing that I think he missed is the need for a law to impeach politicians and public officials who aid and abet criminal entities. Mr. Orane is an example of what I believe Jamaica needs…think tanks to help provide guidelines and principles for the governance of the nation. The government alone cannot do it.

Patterson calls for action on migration

Monday, July 05, 2010

David Armstrong
7/5/2010

Very little, if anything, was heard from Mr. Patterson during the Dudus brouhaha. During his tenure as PM crime escalated to what was perhaps the worst crime period in JA’s history. If his administration had implemented stringent measures to deal with the crime situation that garrison constituencies spawned JA would probably have been spared the Dudus embarrassment. Mr. Patterson is now trying to promote this commission which I believe is a low priority issue for Jamaica. He should be calling for a commission of inquiry for the Dudus affair that nearly brought down the government.

Nicolas Henry
7/5/2010

@David Armstrong// Crime escalated during the Paterson tenure, yet the JA voters kept them in power for that long. Sometimes I wonder if that’s the way Jamaicans wanted things to be.

Lewin is not a ‘yes man’ — Simpson Miller

Garfield Myers

Wednesday, July 07, 2010

David Armstrong
7/7/2010

“I found him to be an honest, forthright person, respectful, but not a yes man. If he does not agree he is not afraid to say so. He will not simply tell you what you want to hear. He will tell you the facts, and his analysis of them. He is a dedicated soldier, a loyal servant of the people and a patriot of Jamaica,” Simpson Miller, who is president of the PNP, said.
OK so no more argument because the above endorsement by Portia is sacred. Portia do me a favor call for a commission of inquiry.

David Armstrong
7/7/2010

All Jamaicans should be fed up with this ongoing bickering over who did what, who lied, who protected Dudus, etc. The Dudus brouhaha exposed all kinds of problem within the government, the security forces, and within the justice system. For these reasons one would expect that the thing to do is to have a commission of inquiry. I know the politicians who have garrison constituences don’t want this. However, it is not what is good for them it is what is good for the country.

EDITORIAL

Mr Lewin or Mr Nelson, of whom should we be afraid?

Wednesday, July 07, 2010

David Armstrong
7/7/2010

Dear Editor could you provide some information as to who has the authority to call for a commission of inquiry. I believe that the Governor General has this authority to do so. If it is the government, I don’t expect that they will do so because the PM himself would be a major person of interest to this commission. What has ben exposed so far about the Dudus case is the tip of the iceberg. Only through a commission of inquiry will the truth be told.

EDITORIAL

Is the PNP running out of ideas?

Thursday, July 08, 2010

David Armstrong
7/8/2010

I have completely lost my confidence with the leadership of the PNP and the JLP. They are a selfish, corrupt, and power hungry bunch of people who care only for their own self interest. For nearly three decades or more these pitiful souls have allowed all kinds of evil and social problems to inundate the Jamaica. Given the power and authority by the people to make Jamaica a prosperous, peaceful, safe place they have allowed the opposite to happen. The economy is in a shambles and violent crime occurs on an almost daily basis. The Dudus fiasco provided these scums with an opportunity to purge their souls. Instead they buried they are hopping along on their merry way as if it was no big deal. Wake up Jamaicans you deserve better

Golding must guard against taking on the media

By Al Edwards

Friday, July 09, 2010

How ironic for the PM to talk about scurrilous, unsubstantiated allegations or innuendoes by the media having a DNA effect. His DNA is all over Dudus and that is not scurrilous or unsubstantiated because he admitted to the nation his involvement in procuring the services of the US law firm to block the extradition. This one act of complicity at the highest level of government exposed the depth of the corruption that stems from the garrison constituencies that have been nurtured over the years by the politicians. Like so many Jamaicans I wanted to give Mr. Golding a second chance but I am now convinced that he is not going to change the status quo as it relates to garrison constituencies and the corruption of politicians.

Anti-crime bills passed

Senate approves controversial anti-crime bills

Saturday, July 10, 2010

David Armstrong
7/10/2010

The anticrime bills will do nothing to deter the two main crime problems – the epidemic of violent gun crimes and the corruption of public officials. The corruption of public officials is a serious problem and probably is responsible for the flow of illegal guns into the country. Fighting crime in Jamaica wil not be effective when you have the foxes guarding the hen house. The anticrime bills do not have any provision to neutralize the foxes so they will remain corrupt.

‘End state of emergency’

Rights groups say measure not a long-term tool to fight crime

BY KARYL WALKER Online Editor walkerk@jamaicaobserver.com

Tuesday, July 13, 2010

David Armstrong
7/13/2010

These groups are out of touch with the reality of violent crime in Jamaica. The reality is that many people have been brutally murdered by barbaric gunmen so any tool or method that will stop them should be utilized. They are always finding fault with any measures used to stop or eliminate these barbaric gunmen but never offering any solutions or support for victims of violent crimes and their families. Instead of defending the perpetrators of crime they should be more vocal and critical of the corruption of politicians and the pervasive crime that garrison constituencies have incubated over the years.

‘Police should not be expected to clean up mess left by politicians’

Rights activist says cops given basket to carry water

BY TANESHA MUNDLE Observer staff reporter mundlet@jamaicaobserver.com

Tuesday, July 13, 2010

David Armstrong
7/13/2010

If these so called human rights group want to be political activists they should advocate the implementation of laws to dismantle garrison constituencies and the corruption it causes. garrison constituencies are an incubator for crime and corruption. If this this incubator is eliminated violent crimes would significantly decline and the police would not have to clean up the mess that the politicians create.

David Armstrong
7/13/2010

While most of the violent crime in JA is being committed by people who are poor and undereducated there is no strong evidence that suggests that poverty is a significant cause of crime. Many poor people are probably more law abiding than rich people. It is true that poor people if they are in a desperate situation may resort to crime as a survival means. This is what I believe has happened in TG and other poor garrison constituencies. Being poor and uneducated they are vulnerable to manipulation and exploitation by politicians as we have seen. The fact remains that where crime exist the police will be drawn to those areas and if there is resistance people will be killed. To argue that the police is picking on poor people is naïve.

David Armstrong
7/13/2010

OK so the jails are overcrowed with criminals confined in 6 by 20 ft cell. At least they are still alive. Some of these criminals are responsible for victims who are now 6 ft deep in the ground. We can’t have it both ways folks…when people are brutually murdered you cry for the government and police to do something. When they do take out these thugs then you start crying police brutality. We have a new breed of criminal thugs who are ruthless and they prefer to be taken dead than alive.

Stephen Fox
7/13/2010

@David Armstrong, we can and we must have it both ways. Police must have adequate resources to enforce the law and citizens rights must be protected. Not everyone in that 6 by 20 ft cell is a criminal.

Christie: My conscience is immune to breach

Tuesday, July 13, 2010

David Armstrong
7/13/2010

Kudos to you Mr. Christie for your courages work. Jamaica desperately need more public officials like you. Don’t let these corrupt politicians intimidate you or try to silence you. Jamaicans need to expose them and stand up against them. If they don’t they will allow them to continue to sink the country deeper into the cess pool.

Manatt again – American law firm claims it got US$15,000 more

Phillips renews call for enquiry into Manatt issue

BY ALICIA DUNKLEY Senior staff reporter dunkleya@jamaicaobserver.com

Thursday, July 15, 2010

David Armstrong
7/15/2010

OK it is time for heads to roll in the Bruce Golding administration. And it is time for the PM to step down. Too many lies and corruption here. Whoever was involved in the authorization of any payment to MPP must resign now. Somebody must be held accountable for betraying the public trust and using tax payers money to defend or protect a person (Dudus) accused of criminal activities.

David Armstrong
7/15/2010

@ devon brown .. One of the reason for all these problems in Jamaica is that there is a culture that accepts incompetence, corruption, and just about every negative thing that thwart progress. Jamaicans will have to become more proactive and demand higher standards from their public officials. We simply cannot sit back and let the politicians get their way. This is what they want but we should not tolerate this anymore. Enuf is enuf ..let’s light a fire under their tails.

God is moving Jamaica forward — Golding

Pat Roxborough-Wright

Monday, July 19, 2010

David Armstrong
7/19/2010

There are many people who believe that God is directly involved in their social, political, and economic life. This belief is built on misconception as to who God is. While they are entitled to their belief the truth is that God is a spirit and does not behave like how humans behave. For the PM to state that God is moving Jamaica forward is a good example of how religion is used to appease people or to tell them what they want to hear. While God created us HE gave us free will to determine our own destiny. In essence we are responsible for whatever consequences befall

us. If Jamaica is to move forward the PM must implement policies that will clean up corruption and crime. God is not going to implement those policies for him.

oface oface
7/19/2010

god is delivering and you are the vehicle mr golding may god give you strength to see it through

Brain Allen
7/19/2010

David Armstrong, I could not have said it better, well said. oface oface, you are like a sheep.

Winston Jones
7/19/2010

@ David Armstrong – I gree with you 100%. God do not involve Himself in the actions of man. God made a covenant with man, laid out the commandments by which man should live. Man have the freedom to act and do what he wants but will face judgement based upon the commandments. If God was interactive in the behaviour of man there would be no raping of little children, no killing of the innocent and no suffering of the sick. And when people pray to God, the Lord prayer is “Our Father”

carl ricketts
7/19/2010

A@ armstrong, Again my friend you are wrong. God uses men and wmn to carry out his will. If Golden has faith in God and trust God. God can and will do anything. When God partd the red sea. He did it through of faith of a man. and not just any man. But, a man that did commit murder. So, I would advise, please stop speaking for God. you should speak from where the word begins and stop where the word stops you. How can you say what you have said, by wht authority do you speak? who appointed you?

PNP shoots down State of Emergency

Opposition shuns extension request by security forces

Wednesday, July 21, 2010

David Armstrong
7/21/2010

One reason why Jamaica has not made progress is because of the reactive nature of both political parties. Instead of finding solutions to problems, either party will sit back (usually the opposition party) and react to whatever the other party does. While some of this reaction might be necessary it does no good if this happens all the time without any meaningful alternative solutions. Case in point the opposition is asking for the govt. to present their comprehensive crime plan. Does the opposition have one? The opposition don’t have to wait to be in power to initiate solutions to any problem that is detrimental to the progress of the country.

Editorial

The PNP’s underwear is showing, and it’s not clean!

David Armstrong
7/21/2010

The headline to this article is an awful pun especially since the the leader of the PNP is a female. Come on Observer try to maintain a higher standard. Your newspaper is taking on the apppearance of a tabloid newspaper.

Winston G
7/21/2010

@ David Armstrong:
Your allusion to the headline being inappropriate – especially because the leader of the opposition is female is – at the least -sad. It is not only females who wear underwear. Let’s not go down the sexist road.

‘Battle will be won’

PM says new anti-crime measures fast-tracked, take effect tomorrow

Thursday, July 22, 2010

David Armstrong
7/22/2010

We are being led to believe that the SOE is the key to fighting crime. It is a temporary measure and does nothing to stop some of the major contributing sources of crime. The anti crime bills do not address what I believe is a major problem that contributes to crime: public officials who are corrupt or who aid and abet people with criminal background (for example dons and their minions). Implementing laws to impeach these public officials would cut off a source that is a catalyst for crime.

MP must pay $1.6m in back taxes or face prison

BY HG HELPS Editor-at-Large helpsh@jamaicaobserver.com

Thursday, July 22, 2010

David Armstrong
7/22/2010

MPs should set an example for the rest of us. When ordinary people do not comply with the laws they are prosecuted. MPs are not above the law and this MP should be prosecuted to the full extent prescribed by the law if he is guilty. Jamaica cannot afford their public officials to behave as if they are above the law and they can engage in corruption and get away with …not anymore. Times are a changing so any public official out there take heed.

Police to increase cordon, searches and roadblocks

BY KARYL WALKER Online editor walkerk@jamaicaobserver.com

Friday, July 23, 2010

David Armstrong
7/23/2010

For the first time I am begining to get the sense that the police seems to have good leadership. Commissioner Ellington seems to be doing the right things so far and does not appear to be easily influence by the corrupt politicians. This is good because when politicians control the police the police themselves become corrupt and cannot perform their job effectively. And gues what happens under these circumstances…crime increases and becomes harder to bring under control.

Editorial

1,600 voices speaking from the grave

David Armstrong
7/23/2010

Fighting crime in Jamaica is not an ideological issue and so should never be a political issue. The safety of people must come before any political agenda. If any political party fail to recognize this and do things that undermine the fight against crime then that party is putting their interest before the interest of the people they serve. It is time for politicians to think smart and act smart.

Bauxite revival – 629 get jobs

as Windalco Ewarton reopens

BY PAUL HENRY Observer staff reporter henryp@jamaicaobserver.com

Friday, July 23, 2010

David Armstrong
7/23/2010

This is a surprise development but when you consider that the Russians own 90% of the plant a picture emerges that removes the element of surprise. The Chinese just purchase the sugar plantations and I don’t remember what else they own in Jamaica. With China emerging as a major global force in and Russia rebuilding its super power status, these two countries are going to compete for resources and political control or influence in countries like Jamaica. This is what I believe is part of the reason for the Windalco reopening. I could be wrong though.

New anti-crime laws take effect as State of Emergency ends

Saturday, July 24, 2010

David Armstrong
7/24/2010

Unfortunately what is really missing from this anti crime bill is an act to impeach politicians and other public officials who involved in corrupt and criminal behaviour. For example those who have ties to dons and their minions and do things that benefit the dons as we saw in the Dudus extradition case.

Thwaites: I will be an informer

MP calls for link between politics and crime to be severed

BY ERICA VIRTUE Observer writer virtuee@jamaicaobserver.com

Monday, August 16, 2010

David Armstrong
8/16/2010

If Mr. Thwaites want to talk tough that’s OK. However, it is going to take much more than words to deal with the violent and barbaric crime situation. A structural framework that will enable the police to effectively fight crime and will encourage the public to be involved must be established. This can be done if MPs like Mr. Thwaites implement tough laws to deal with the mindless perpetrators of these heinous crimes. The framework of these laws should facilitate disarming those with illegal weapons; enforcing swift and severe punishment (including execution); and impeaching MPs who are linked to criminals or dons. Tough talk is a waste of time and provides no guarantee of accomplishing anything. Tough actions must be implemented, that’s the only way to deal with out of control crime.

Monday, August 16, 2010

EDITORIAL

The bloodthirstiness has returned

David Armstrong
8/16/2010

There is no question that the State of Emergency (SOE) is an effective means of suppressing crime. The problem with the SOE is that it is a short term measure and is a lightening rod for controversy and constitutional questions. The law makers need to establish a structural framework that involves tough new laws aimed at disarming the mindless gunmen; dismantling garrison constituencies; and eliminating corruption. The recent anti crime bill had no provisions for facilitating any of the above

Pu dung di gun’ campaign launched

BY PAUL HENRY Observer staff reporter henryp@jamaicaobserver.com

Monday, August 16, 2010

David Armstrong
8/16/2010

Any campaign to get criminals to turn in their gun is commendable. Personally, I believe that it is going to take much more than this campaign to accomplish this. The problem is that the people who have guns are connected to a gang. A gang member cannot simple walk away from a gang or turn in his gun and remain a member of the gang. The challenge then is how to dismantle the gangs. One way of doing this is to infiltrate the gangs or identify the leaders. A campaign aimed at identifying the gang leaders could include posting their pictures or names on billboards. Offering reward for the arrest and conviction of these gang leaders would also help to dismantle the gangs. There are many more ideas that I believe could work but the problem is we don’t seems to have the political leadership that is willing to implement these crime fighting measures.

EDITORIAL

A lesson in tourism from Britain

Tuesday, August 17, 2010

David Armstrong
8/17/2010

I was watching the Travel Channel last night on their feature about Singapore and tourism. Now Singapore has a diverse group of people similar to Jamaica. The majority of people are of Chinese extraction followed by Indians, and Euro-Asians. I was amazed at what Singapore has accomplished in terms of a vibrant economy fueled by

tourism. Jamaica has more natural resources that could be developed as tourist attractions yet many of these resources remain undeveloped. Port Royal for example with its historic background could be developed as a major tourist port. The problem with Jamaica is that our political leaders are too selfish, too corrupt, and don’t have the vision to develop the things to attract tourists and grow the economy.

EDITORIAL

Our passive attitude to violence

Wednesday, August 18, 2010

David Armstrong
8/18/2010

Your editorial is correct about the passivity of Jamaicans with respect to violent crime. Jamaicans including your paper tend to look at major social issues as a party issue and expect the politicians to fix the problem. Instead of demanding specific actions from the politicians they sit and wait to see what the politicians are going to do. When nothing gets done the issue fades away as with the Dudus affair. The PM apologized and implemented the SOE in reaction to the disturbance by Dudus supporters. Those were the only actions from this disgraceful event. Jamaicans (and especially the intelligentsia), and your newspaper should have strongly demanded a truth and reconciliation commission and specific measures to sever the nexus between politicians and the criminal elements in their garrison constituencies.

David Armstrong
8/18/2010

Some of the comments have correctly pointed to a culture that has enabled violent crime to occur with impunity. We see this in the dancehall music that blatantly incites violence. This music has influenced a lot of young people who are primarily the perpetrators of violent crimes. The other enablers in this corrupt Jamaican culture are the politicians who are unable to implement effective measures to stop the high frequency of heinous crime because they have been made ineffective by corruption and association with the criminal elements in their garrison constituencies. It doesn’t make sense that so many young people who are unemployed and undereducated can be armed with expensive handguns. Jamaica does not manufacture guns or bullets so where do these people get the resources and ability to acquire these weapons and bullets.

COLUMNS

Warmington must resign

Mark Wignall

David Armstrong
8/19/2010

Mr. Wignall it appears that your column is based on a personal vendetta arising from Mr. Warmington’s behavior at the meeting you mentioned. If Mr. Warmington is found to be involved in any unethical behavior or impropriety then yes he should definitely resign. I have advocated in previous comments to various articles that there should be a law to remove these MPs from office who are found guilty of these offences. Jamaica cannot move forward when we have MPs who should be setting the standards lowering them instead.

Hope after massacre

Tredegar Park residents keeping fingers crossed as mobile police post assigned to troubled community

BY KIMMO MATTHEWS Observer staff reporter matthewsk@jamaicaobserver.com

Thursday, August 19, 2010

David Armstrong
8/19/2010

By the way why is Mr. Vaz present with the Minister of Security at this scene. He was left, right, and center during Dudusgate. Does his job in the PMs office with responsibility for information requires him to be at these garrison constituencies when these criminal incidents occur? What kind of information is he trying to get at these scene? Just asking. Dudusgate provided a great opportunity to get rid of garrison politics but it seems to me that it’s business as usual.

David Armstrong
8/19/2010

I am sick and disgusted with politicians who all they can do is recite empty words instead of putting real measures in place to fight crime. “Hunting them down like the dogs they are” is that a solution to deterring or preventing these barbaric murders from occurring? Isn’t this what we expect the police to do? Another thing I have a problem with is this: Why is the Minister discussing strategy with the police to apprehend the murders?” This is not is job he needs to let the police do their work, they don’t need his help. This is why it is so hard to fight crime in these garrison constituencies. These politicians interfere with the legal process so that they can protect their turf.

EDITORIAL

Here we go again

Friday, August 20, 2010

David Armstrong
8/20/2010

“For we hold that there is much that Prime Minister Bruce Golding has failed to tell us…” The editor should by now realize that no one in the government including the PM is going to divulge any information on Dudusgate. The only way to get to the bottom of this corrupt political system that facilitated Dudusgate is to have a Truth and Reconciliation Commission. This is the blueprint that will lay the foundation for corrective measures to be implemented. Promises and empty words by politicians are not going to do it. I implore the editor to demand this commission.

Was Tredegar Park massacre politically motivated?

Friday, August 20, 2010

David Armstrong
8/20/2010

Bishop Herro Blair like the rest of us wants answers and solutions to the violent crimes that affect the entire country. His investigation is not going to provide the answers and solutions though. A broader comprehensive process to investigate the political system that is intertwined with corruption and criminals is what is needed. This process is a Truth and reconcilliation commission. It has worked in countries like South Africa and Liberia that had crisis proportion problems.

David Armstrong
8/20/2010

The question of political motivation in the Tredegar murders is a serious question that points to a political system that is intertwined with violent crime. Real or perceived politics cannot be eliminated from violent crime in Jamaica. Dudusgate revealed that the government’s priority was to protect Dudus from extradition. Both political parties are

deeply entrenched in this corrupt political system and it has not only created a climate conducive to violent crimes it has thwarted economic development. A truth and reconciliation commission offers the best hope of cleaning up this corrupt political system.

David Armstrong
8/20/2010

The question of political motivation in the Tredegar murders is a serious question that points to a political system that is intertwined with violent crime. Real or perceived politics cannot be eliminated from violent crime in Jamaica. Dudusgate revealed that the government and specifically the PM who was willing to risk his political and the priority was to protect Dudus from extradition. Both political parties are deeply entrenched in this corrupt political system and it has not only created a climate conducive to violent crimes it has thwarted economic development. A truth and reconciliation commission offers the best hope of cleaning up this corrupt political system.

Former top cop Thomas against gun amnesty

BY ALESIA EDWARDS Observer staf reporter

Monday, August 23, 2010

David Armstrong
8/23/2010

Mr. Thomas has not offered much in terms of a solution to fighting crime. Gun amnesty can be a part of the plan to disarm the criminals but it must include without tough conditions to make it effective. For example: 1) An automatic death sentence for a murder with an illegal gun, 2) life imprisonment for those who provide an illegal gun or is the source of n illegal gun, 2) seizure of any property where an illegal gun is found (house, automobile, business, etc.), and 3) reward for anyone providing info leading to the recovery of an illegal gun. Disarming the criminals and cutting off the source of the illegal weapons must be the number one priority to fighting crime and it is going to require tough and unpopular methods to do so.

Bashing of ‘Superman’ Golding doesn’t bother daughter

BY HG HELPS Editor-at-Large

Monday, August 23, 2010

David Armstrong
8/23/2010

The comments by the PM’s daughter should not be a surprise to anyone. Children of political leaders like the PMs Daughter are not going to be objective in dealing with the actions of their father. As a child they see their parent as a parent first and not as a politician. This emotional bond does not allow for the acceptance of any negative criticism or behavior from their political leader parent. Very few children have been able to distance themselves from the political actions and policies of their parent. Castro’s daughter is an example.

Bunny Wailer chants support for Rasta Millennium Council

BY BASIL WALTERS Observer staff reporter

Monday, August 23, 2010

David Armstrong
8/23/2010

While some rastafarians have made significant contribution in the fiels of arts and entertainment thta group has a whole has not contributed much to jamaican society. To begin with the rastafarian culture revolves around

erroneous facts and misguided beliefs. If history about the slave trade is correct Rastafarians cannot claim and ties to Ethiopia. Bunny Wailer has a lot of influence through his music. While trying to promote the rastafarism he should also try and promote non-violence.

Phillips: PM knew about ‘Dudus’ request from Oct ’07

Monday Exchange

BY ERICA VIRTUE Observer writer virtuee@jamaicaobserver.com

Tuesday, August 24, 2010

David Armstrong
8/24/2010

One of the reason why Jamaica has not made much progress is that we do not learn from our mistakes. When a mistake is made the root cause for the mistake must be identified and corrective actions taken to prevent the mistake occuring again. This has not been done with the Dudus affair. Many of the comments posted reflect the attitude of not wanting to learn from the mistakes and correct the source of the mistake. I suggest we change our attitude and call for a TRUTH & RECONCILLIATION COMMISSION.

EDITORIAL

You deserve more, Ms Ann-Merita Golding

Tuesday, August 24, 2010

David Armstrong
8/24/2010

This story about th PMs daughter is irrelevant and should not be getting this kind of attention. It does not deserve your editoral space. the PM’s family life and his daughter’s feeling about him are of no relevance to the governance of Jamaica. The critisism of the PM’s involvement/handling of Dudus extradition will continue are fully justifiable. I would suggest that Ms. Golding focus more on her studies and avoid giving interviews because once she does this she is fair game herself.

Phillips wants provision to screen all political candidates

Monday Exchange

Alicia Dunkley

Tuesday, August 24, 2010

David Armstrong
8/24/2010

All candidates for public office should be throughly vetted. This is one way to eliminate people with corrupt and criminal ties.

Gov’t facing a growing crisis of trust, says Phillips

Monday Exchange

BY ALICIA DUNKLEY Senior staff reporter dunkleya@jamaicaobserver.com

Tuesday, August 24, 2010

David Armstrong
8/24/2010

Mr. Phillips why don’t you call for a TRUTH & RECONCILLIATION COMMISION to look into the garrison politics that led to the Dudus saga. I am sure you are aware that it would damage your political ambitions. However, you have to stand on principles and do the right thing for the Ja. Do this you will get the jump on the other MPs and furthermore your trust would be restored. We all make mistakes but it is when we see the folly of our mistakes and try to correct them that we become better person.

COLUMNS

A high price to pay for integrity

Heart to Heart

with Betty-Ann Blaine

David Armstrong
8/24/2010

Ms. Blaine this is just a suggestion for you. Now that you are a political leader or have ambitions to be one you should promote yourself as such and not as a columnist. You can do this by establishing principles that your political organization will stand for. You could make public statements about how to reform the curent political system to rid it of the corruption. It is the corruption of the political system and the violence that it breeds that threatens the work Mr. Christie is doing.

Gov’t dismissive in latest Manatt saga

Wednesday, August 25, 2010

David Armstrong
8/25/2010

When are people going to come to their senses and realize that Dudusgate is not a JLP or PNP issue? Yes the JLP and by extension the government is responsible and accountable for this unfortunate and notorious event. However, because Dudusgate points to a systemic problem in the political system and because it led to near anarchy it became a serious national issue. If the politicians and the Jamaican people continue to view Dudusgate as a political issue (JLP vs. PNP) then nothing is going to be gained from this and no corrective actions are going to be made. Because this is a national issue and the political system is still affected by it becomes more imperative that a TRUTH & RECONCILLIATION COMMISSION be established.

mike daley
8/25/2010

@David Armstrong..It is almost embarrassing to listen to some of the comments about this whole saga from people who regard themselves as educated and intelligent. To hear people excusing and apologizing for the PM or making it into a PNP vs JLP argument shows how much tribal politics have polluted the very psyche of ppl. You don’t point to one wrong to justify another. That’s idiocy. You hold whomever it may be accountable (PNP/JLP). That’s responsible governing.

Small contracts, big money

• Points to $88b awarded last year

Wednesday, August 25, 2010

David Armstrong
8/25/2010

It is disturbing but not surprising to learn that the identity of entities awarded government contracts is not known. Is it possible that there was no bidding process in place and this bidding process was not made public? This is how the govt. is able to give people like Dudus contracts that helped established his wealth. This makes me sick to the stomach. This is another issue that deserves a Commission of Inquiry. Wake up Jamaicans it is full time we demand real accountability and change. This corruption that has cast a shadow over the political system affects both the JLP and the PNP. They both have maggots in their system.

EDITORIAL

Nationalism vs patriotism

Wednesday, August 25, 2010

David Armstrong
8/25/2010

This editorial is too superficial in that it makes pious and virtuous statements that have no relationship to the subject matter or the reality that exist in Jamaica. Take for example the statement: “For if we did indeed love Jamaica, we would care for the country in much the same way we care for our families and will do almost anything to help them develop and make them safe and happy.” Some families are dysfunctional and they create mayhem and destructive behavior towards their family and society. The same is true about Jamaica, it is a dysfunctional state.

PM to explain Manatt issue in islandwide meetings

BY PATRICK FOSTER Observer writer fosterp@jamaicaobserver.com

Thursday, August 26, 2010

David Armstrong
8/26/2010

No! No! No! Mr. PM this is approach is not going to work. At this stage it is difficult for anyone to believe what you say about Dudusgate. These meetings will more than likely be with your supporters who will accept anything you say. You cannot put this matter to rest with this approach it is only going to create more controversy and more political reaction. Jamaicans deserve an official investigation in the form of a TRUTH AND RECONCILLIATION COMMISSION. This is the only thing that will work.

The PM could of resolved this Dudus and its related Mannat issue long ago but he continues to play Jamaicans for idiots to protect his political career. Now we hear that Mannat has admitted working for the govt. instead of the JLP. Telling lies is like stuggling to get out of a quick sand. The more you struggle the more you sink. There is still hope though for the PM he can call for a TRUTH & RECONCILLIATION COMMISSION to look into the Dudus case and the the systemic corruption in both parties.

The political system needs to be purged of the corruption that has rendered it useless. Jamaica cannot make any real progress when the govt. and the Opposition party (yes the JLP and the PNP for those supporters who defend their party at any cost) is so entrenched in corruption. The violent crime plaguing the country cannot be stopped when both political parties support the garrison politics that breed crime and corruption. A TRUTH & RECONCILLIATION COMMISION will purge the political system.

John Smith
8/26/2010

David Armstrong, you said it well. An independent Commission of Enquiry is what is needed. That will surely be more cost effective than an islandwide public relations campaign – Mr Golding must have better things to do with his time, as outlined by George Watson. The Jamaican people want the independently verified truth, not another questionable storyline coming from lips caught in lies of omission. This if it happens will be an exercise in politricks, not an exercise in accountablity.

Colin Campbell steps away

Former minister withdraws candidacy for NC Clarendon seat

BY HG HELPS Editor-at-Large helpsh@jamaicaobserver.com

Thursday, August 26, 2010

David Armstrong
8/26/2010

Mr. Cambell here is a suggestion for you. You are in the position you are because of your own doing and the diligent work of Mr. Christie. If you recognize this and accept it then you are on the way to beeng a better man. Here is my suggestion for you. How about condemning corruption in the political system and endorsing the work Mr. Christie is doing. You will be doing a great service not just for yourself but for Jamaica.

David Armstrong
8/26/2010

Mr. Wignall you write truth to power. The headline of your column is very appropriate. It is amazing that the PM believes that his approach to put the e-mail issue and the whole Dudus matter to rest is to conduct island wide meetings. He is acting like a political neophyte rather than a shrewed politician. Doesn’t he realize that this is just going to stir more political raction. A TRUTH & RECONCILLIATION COMMISSION is badly needed, please call for this in one of your column.

COLUMNS

The suicidal Bruce Golding

Mark Wignall

David Armstrong
8/26/2010

Mr. Wignall you write truth to power. The headline of your column is very appropriate. It is amazing that the PM believes that his approach to put the e-mail issue and the whole Dudus matter to rest is to conduct island wide meetings. He is acting like a political neophyte rather than a shrewed politician. Doesn’t he realize that this is just going to stir more political raction. A TRUTH & RECONCILLIATION COMMISSION is badly needed, please call for this in one of your column.

COLUMNS

Torn between two lovers

LLOYD B SMITH

David Armstrong
8/26/2010

I do not want to speculate about the PMs political future or waste any more time talking about what he said or did in the past. All I want him to do is to call for a TRUTH AND RECONCILLIATION COMMISSION to address the Dudus affair and the broader issue of garrison politics that created Dudus. Mr. Smith just like I have asked mr. Wignal to demand this I am aalos asking you to the do the same. You guys have lots of media influence and your voice on this matter will pressure the PM to do so.

The PM could of resolved this Dudus and its related Mannat issue long ago but he continues to play Jamaicans for idiots to protect his political career. Now we hear that Mannat has admitted working for the govt. instead of the JLP. Telling lies is like stuggling to get out of a quick sand. The more you struggle the more you sink. There is still hope though for the PM he can call for a TRUTH & RECONCILLIATION COMMISSION to look into the Dudus case and the the systemic corruption in both parties.

Phillips calls for single anti-corruption agency

Thursday, August 26, 2010

David Armstrong
8/26/2010

Dr. Phillips has been doing a lot of talking recently while his boss remains very quiet…is there a rift in the party or is a leadership coup eminent? His ideas are OK but they accomplish nothing other than geting news media coverage. Dr. Phillips and other MPs should introduce bills in parliament that incorporate their ideas instead of just talking. We have had enough bantering from these MPs (one wants to be an informer and one rejects dons) it is time they take real action to get things done

PNP wants solicitor general to go

BY ERICA VIRTUE Observer writer virtuee@jamaicaobserver.com

Friday, August 27, 2010

David Armstrong
8/27/2010

What is very sad is that some people see this Dudus matter through the political prism. Dudusgate is not simply a political issue and it is a much bigger problem than Dudus. Dudus is just one manifestation of a serious problem related to violent cerime and corruption within the political system. This issue is not about PNP or JLP . Sure the PNP is going to try and get political milage out of it. So please stop being short sighted and think about the future of Jamaica.

David Armstrong
8/27/2010

As to the question of who will implement laws or changes it will be the same corrupt politicians. However, it is the people whom they work for that will have to demand these changes. That is the way the political process work. We have to put fire to their tail to get them to stick their neck out and make these changes. Again the issue of corruption,

violent crime, and Dudus is not a PNP or JLP issue it is a national issue and can only be fixed by an independent process…Truth & Recon. Com’sion.

EDITORIAL

What hope for Mr Golding on his public relations tour?

Friday, August 27, 2010

David Armstrong
8/27/2010

Whoever is giving the PM advice is doing a poor job. The objective of this PR tour seems to be nothing more than to do damage control. The PM is trapped in quick sand and the more he struggles to free himself the more he sinks. The only lifeline for him is to shut-up and call for a TRUTH & RECONCILLIATION COMMISSION. He would have to testify here but at the end of the day he would have purged his soul and maybe redeem himself.

EDITORIAL

Time to deliver that National Sports Policy

Saturday, August 28, 2010

David Armstrong
8/28/2010

Who cares about national sports policy when people are being savagely murdered. The priority should be to implement a tough crime fighting policy to stop the violent crimes. Everything else is secondary to this problem. The country cannot make any meaningful progress under this crime condition. The failure to deal effectively with this problem will eventually lead to anarchy. It almost happened with the Dudus issue. There should be a national protest day to demand real action from the govt.

COLUMNS

Rating scandals: Trafigura vs Manatt

Mark Wignall

David Armstrong
8/29/2010

Trying to compare two political scandals is a subjective process. Unless there is some standard that can be used to apply the metrics the result is going to depend on the political persuasion of the person doing the comparison. With respect to the Trafigura vs. Manatt cases both point s to the systemic corruption the political system. If we use these two political scandals to rate or judge the political parties then we miss a bigger opportunity to correct the problem. Another problem with political scandals is that the facts are never fully known. That is why it is imperative to hold Commission of Inquiry or a Truth & Reconciliation Commission for these scandals.

No laws were broken, says Samuda

The Manatt Affair

BY ERICA VIRTUE Observer Writer virtuee@jamaicaobserver.com

Monday, August 30, 2010

David Armstrong
8/30/2010

This is exctly why a Truth and Reconcilliation Commission is required. Without it Dudus/MPP case is going to continue to play out as a political issue. Anything Mr. Samuda, the PM, or any other MP says about this issue is questionable. Do you think criminals would confess their crime ouside of the judicila system…absolutely not. The only time they will confess is when they are in court or they are in prison. Moral of this is that the truth is not going to come from Mr. Samuda or the govt.

David Armstrong
8/30/2010

Nobody is hell-bent on overthrowing the PM Mr. Samuda. The Dudus and the related MPP case is one of trust, integrity, and corruption. The public does not know if any laws were broken at this stage. It is you and your colleagues who are hell bent on covering up this matter, Jamaicans have a right to demand the truth and accountability. You are doing the country a disservice by trying to cover up this matter and make it appear as if it is insignificant. Jamaica deserves better governance.

COLUMNS

Half-truths, untruths and cover-ups

Heart to Heart

With Betty Ann Blaine

David Armstrong
8/31/2010

Ms. Blaine as a person who intends to establish an alternative political party you are missing a wonderful opportunity to help you do this. You should be advocating measures under the banner of your political organization to denounce the garrison politics and the systemic corruption that has paralyzed the PNP and the JLP. You state that somewhere between the half-truths, the untruths and the cover-ups, the Jamaican people are waiting to see if there is one honest politician from either side who will “speak the truth and shame the devil”. Are you naïve ..that will happen when hell freezes over.

David Armstrong
8/31/2010

Here is another suggestion for you Ms. Blaine. How about calling for a TRUTH and RECONCILLIATION COMMISSION or the Dudus/MPP affair. Put yourself and your party on record as demanding this. Call a press confrenece and let Jamaicans know that your party wants to clean up the corruption in politics, dismantle garrison constituences, impeach politicians who are involved in corruption. Do these things and you and your party will be seen as a credible alternative choice for Jamaica.

Esmore Gillings
8/31/2010

@David, I totally agree with you. On reading the article I was holding my breath to see Miss Blaine’s alternative, something that would electrify me and makes me want to go out there and vote for her, but I am still waiting.

COLUMNS

We need the full truth, Mr Golding

RAULSTON NEMBHARD

David Armstrong

9/1/2010

The best chance of getting the full truth or near to it is from a TRUTH & RECONCILLIATION COMMISSION. This commission would not only get to the truth it would help to heal the corrruption across the polirical spectrum.

PNP unveils Integrity Commission

BY ERICA VIRTUE Observer writer virtuee@jamaicaobserver.com

Wednesday, September 01, 2010

David Armstrong
9/1/2010

This integrity commission that is being unveiled by the PNP reminds me of the fable of the fox guarding the hen house. We have a political system that is corrupt and is entrenched in garrison politics and as a result of this we have a lot of politicians who have questionable integrity. These are problems that exist within both the PNP and the JLP and have prevented any real corrective actions to be implemented. To restore integrity and clean up the mess will require constitutional changes with new laws. A commission of integrity created out of this political system is not going to achieve anything.

David Armstrong
9/1/2010

What is need is a national solution to solve the integrity problem that exists in the political system. The PNP’s integrity commission might work for their party (although I doubt it) but it certainly won’t work to solve the problem accros the political spectrum. It would have been great if Ms. Simpson had proposed changes to restore integrity, clean up corruption, and dsimantling the garrison constituencies. This would have been a greater service to Jamaica.

David Armstrong
9/1/2010

All gathered around “Mamma P” in the Balm Yard…that’s a good one, I got a good laugh out of it… here is another joke I came up with …Mother hen and her chicks as she gets ready to tell the foxes not to raid her hen house.” I am sorry but i can’t take this integrity commission serious. It’s like trying to put a band aid over a cancerous sore that has metastasize.

Sun Child
9/1/2010

All gathered around “Mamma P” in the Balm Yard…Lord help us, ha ha ha ha.
I am sorry but to see people like Burchell Whiteman’s name being mentioned in connection with politics gives me hives. Its the old guard all over again. Next we will see PJ… dear God.

Texroy Davidson
9/1/2010

While I agree with David Armstrong. There is a saying, you have to dance a yard before you can dance abroad. The move made by the PNP is one to be applauded. It is a good first step. If you can select your candidates on high standards before putting them in the public domain, then you will have more persons selected with High integrity representing the people, therefore the probability of corrutpion activity undertaken by your candidates is lower. Good first Move

EDITORIAL

Is a country not worth more than political gamesmanship?

Wednesday, September 01, 2010

David Armstrong
9/1/2010

While I have no problem with this editorial I am disappointed that the Editor has not taken a stand and call for specific actions that would facilitate an official account of Dudus/MPP. Specifically, I am disappointed that the editor has not seen it appropriate to call for a TRUTH & RECONCILLIATION COMMISSION. Surely, you should realize by now that the truth is not going to be told by those responsible for this Dudus mess.

David Armstrong
9/1/2010

Not a week goes by without an editorial that discusses the Dudus/MPP affair. While I have no problem with this I am disappointed that the Editor has not taken a stand and call for specific actions that would facilitate an official account of Dudus/MPP. Specifically, I am disappointed that the editor has not seen it appropriate to call for a TRUTH & RECONCILLIATION COMMISSION. Are we to listen to the politicians babbling everyday and your reaction to them? Surely, you should realize by now that the truth is not going to be told by those responsible for this Dudus mess.

David Armstrong
9/1/2010

This editorial alludes to the lack of political leadership in Jamaica today. Many of the problems are the result of failed political leadership with no vision, no integrity, and no principles. Furthermore the political leaders spend more energy preserving and promoting their political agenda rather than doing the same for their country. A case in point is the newly formed Integrity commission by the PNP. A better plan for Jamaica would have been to restore the integrity of the political system.

Stephen Fox
9/1/2010

@David Armstrong, what will your truth and reconsilliation commission do to fix the problems that ails the country. They could only recommend to parliament who could then ignore the recommendation. Go to the next move on the chess board. The constitution has to be fixed, the libel laws need to be reformed, and laws to make politicla party financing transparent need to be passed. Build the proper infrastructure and the changes will follow.

Minister heckled at police conference

Thursday, September 02, 2010

David Armstrong
9/2/2010

Want to know why the government does not pay its public servants? too much corruption and waste. The money that should be paying the people who perform essential services is used to set up people like Dudus and to pay law firms to squash his case. If an audit was performed to determine how much money goes to political cronies, dons, etc. in no bid contracts that amount would be staggering.

Golding hails China’s visionary approach to int’l relations

BY GARFIELD MYERS Editor-at-Large South/Central Bureau

Thursday, September 02, 2010

David Armstrong
9/2/2010

Talk about visionary approach…Jamaicans are still waiting for a visionary approach to dealing with the social problems plaguing the country. China has a visionary approach to social and technological issues. They are tough on crime (although some would say too extreme) and they don’t let Amnesty Intrnational tell them how to deal with issues in their country. They don’t tolerate corruption by their public officials. Drugs, crime, and indiscipline are not tolerated.

David Armstrong
9/2/2010

@Nicolas Henry.and @Duncan Bertram …your points are valid..China achieved its present economic growth through tough leadership. The gun criminals running around killing people at will could not happen in China.
I made the point when China bought out our sugar plantations that jamaica was selling out all its assets to foreigners. China is using economic hegemony like the US is doing to dominate the world. We should be striving to be independent not dependent..

PM to hold first meeting on Manatt issue today

Patrick Foster

Thursday, September 02, 2010

David Armstrong
9/2/2010

It would be interested to know who are invited to attend this discussion. My suspicion is that the people who are invited are mainly the PMs supporters. The PM has not been forthright on the Dudus/MPP affair. How can he be expected to be forthright now? As I have repeatedly said, the only thing that will get the PM and others involved to talk is a TRUTH & RECONCILLIATION COMMISSION. It will help to bring closure to this repugnant issue and heal the divisions in the country.

David Armstrong
9/2/2010

@Stephen Fox, the Truth & Reconciliation Commission (TRC) would help to accomplish the following: (1) Get those involved with the Dudus/MPP affair to tell the truth (it would accomplish this since it would not seek to prosecute anyone); (2) recommend corrective actions to ensure that the Dudus/MPP incident cannot be repeated; (3) it would defuse the political conflict that the Dudus scandal has caused; and (4) it would provide an opportunity for those involved to get forgiveness and to lay this issue to rest. Countries like South Africa, Liberia, and Rwanda that had crisis type problems have used the TRC with great success.

BUSINESS

Jamaica may have 3 billion barrels of oil

Canadian firm identifies large potential for oil, but won’t drill without a partner

Wednesday, September 01, 2010

David Armstrong
9/2/2010

If jamaica has black gold and it proves to be economically and environmentally feasible to extract it that could be a double edged sword for the country. With the corrupt political system the country would probably not benefit. The money would be siphoned off by the foreign companies who are licensed to operate it and the corrupt politicians would line their pockets from kick back. In short we would probably have a similar situation like Nigeria.

Letters to the Editor

Set up a Truth and Reconciliation Commission

Thursday, September 02, 2010

COLUMNS

What order in the absence of the don?

Mark Wignall

David Armstrong
9/9/2010

The idea that the vacuum created by the absence of Dudus, has caused a return of disorder and open criminality needs a little clarification. Typically, when gang leaders or any kind of leader is removed their organization or gang collapses. The collapse may take some time as the members free of leadership control struggle to maintain the organization. This is true especially if no one was groomed to assume leadership. In the case of criminal organizations a classic example of this is the Mafia. Since Dudus’ extradition more gunmen have been killed by the police just like what happened in the Mafia when that organization started to collapse.

David Armstrong
9/9/2010

Also I am suggesting a clarification to the statement “We gave up Dudus because Jamaica has an extradition treaty with the US.” Without doubt the government even though they were trying to play hardball with the request knew that there were serious political and economic risks involved if they fail to honor the treaty. Still the government tried to find a way to not give up Dudus. The catalyst that nudged the government was the unprecedented pressure from Jamaicans. That pressure included comments, letters, and columns from the Jamaican Diaspora.

Colleagues of slain cop laments targeted attacks

Corey Robinson

Saturday, September 11, 2010

David Armstrong
9/11/2010

The murder of a police officer is a very serious problem in any society. These are people who put their lives on the line to fight crime and to protect the health and safety of the public. The increasing trend of police being killed in line of duty is very alarming. What is even more alarming is that the government appears to have no will in wanting to reverse this trend. Obviously the existing laws, crime fighting methods, and punishment are no longer effective. The government has a responsibility to find new measures that can prevent police being murdered with impunity.

David Armstrong
9/11/2010

How many more cops have to be killed before the govt. implement special measures starting with the execution of anyone who kills a cop. This is a serious crisis that needs to be addressed by the govt. immeditely. It is a disgrace and shame when you have a political system that will make the effort to protect a don but cannot seems to make the effort to to put measures in place to stop this madness. The opposition party is also to be blamed too for their lack of effort in this disturbing trend.

Be careful with Sgt Wilson probe, union boss warns

BY PAUL HENRY Sunday Observer staff reporter henryp@jamaicaobserver.com

Sunday, September 12, 2010

David Armstrong
9/12/2010

If Mr. Golding and his advisors want to make another big mistake then let them go ahead and take reprisal action against Sgt. Wilson for speaking the truth. If the fallout from the disgraceful Dudus affair was bad then can you imagine what would happen if the police support Sgt. Wilson against any action against him. The sayings “a word to the wise is sufficient” and “let sleeping dog” lie are appropriate for the government.

EDITORIAL

Sergeant Raymond Wilson’s courage

Sunday, September 12, 2010

David Armstrong
9/12/2010

If Sgt. Wilson breached the Jamaica Constabulary Force’s rules then shouldn’t that organization be the one to discipline him if that’s what is required. The government should not be involved in any decision or should initiate any such action. It is bad enough that we have a lot og political inteference with law enforcement. This inteference is exactly why we have dons like Dudus being able to operate as untouchables. Any reprisal action by the govt. against Sgt. Wilson will be a big mistake

COLUMNS

Fern Gully penis carvings more comical than obscene

WIGNALL’S WORLD

Mark Wignall

David Armstrong
9/12/2010

Mr. Wignall has a penchant for weaving erotica or sexual stories in his column. I don’t have a problem with this per se, it is just an observation. He would probably do well in writing romance novels. Maybe he does this to portray his wild side or fascination with sexual matters.

COLUMNS

Portia must tell us how the PNP would run things

Chris Burns

David Armstrong
9/13/2010

You are absolutely right the govt. cannot be blamed for the maladies affecting JA. Both political parties must share the blame for everything that is wrong in JA today. They operate under the same corrupting influences as evidenced by the number of scandals they have bee involved in. Don’t expect to hear any solid ideas to restore JA to some level of normalcy is going to come out of their annual conference. It’s going to be political babbling as usual to prime the machine for election.

David Armstrong
9/13/2010

Why should anyone, except the PNP lackeys, expect that the PNP will provide any new ideas on how to solve the serious problems of violent crime and corruption? They ran the country for three terms and failed to fix these problems. Currently, the JLP and the PNP lack the kind of leadership that is needed to restore JA. The current leadership in both parties is spent and tainted with corruption. New bold leadership must be regenerated.

Churches want PM to tell whole story on Manatt

Monday, September 13, 2010

David Armstrong
9/13/2010

The church seems to be the only entity in JA that understands that a commission of inquiry is the right method to get the PM to tell the whole truth about Manatt. Most people don’t seem to understand the nature of politics and politicians? Politics is a system that is rooted in power/control of people and as such encourages manipulation, exploitation, dishonesty, corruption, etc. The people who operate in this system (politicians) do so under these influences and that is why they lie and do things that are unethical and dishonest. The PM is not going to voluntarily tell the whole truth about Manatt. I believe a Truth & reconciliation Commission is even a better choice that a traditional commission as it does not seek to prosecute and is more a healing process.

David Armstrong
9/13/2010

For those who want to forget this issue and move own answer this question: If you are a parent and your child does something wrong that you aware of do you correct the child or you simply ignore the problem? I am sure you would do the former assuming you are a responsible parent. Similarly, if your govt. does something wrong don’t you want them to correct the probleem? That’s what I think every reasonable Jamaican wants. You simple can’t sweep it under the rug and pretend everything is OK.

mike daley
9/13/2010

@David Armstrong & Yellow Belly! A lot of people have gotten so use to tolerating slackness that they feel it should be an acceptable part of the JAcan political scene & our way of life. People fail to realize that the MP&P issue is not just another unfortunate political scandal, but the ultimate example of why JA’s full promise & potential cannot be realized: Garrison politics, corruption & ineffective, unaccountable leadership. Yes we can move on, but w/o change it will never b4 better.

Let us work together to clean up Jamaica

pastor tells politicians

BY ALESIA EDWARDS Observer staff reporter alesiae@jamaicaobserver.com

Monday, September 13, 2010

David Armstrong
9/13/2010

You have a better chance of getting results when the request is specific and outlines what it is you want to be done. If you are a sick person and you go to your doctor and ask him to get you better without telling the doctor your symptoms he is not going to be able to make you better. Two big problems in JA are 1) gunmen and the heinous crime they are committing and 2) the corruption of the political system. These are two specific things that we should be demanding fast track action to clean up. The govt. can find ways to clean up these two problems but they have to be pushed to do so.

Sean H.
9/13/2010

Yes David, I agree with you. The nasty mentality of the people must be changed if anything is to happen. The idea that since X did whatever misdeed and got away with it so it is alright for Y to do it must stop. The idea that having power means that you can do whatever you want must also go.

Portia to deliver message of ‘hope’ at PNP conference

BY ERICA VIRTUE Observer writer virtuee@jamaicaobserver.com

Tuesday, September 14, 2010

David Armstrong
9/14/2010

Hope is nothing more than a wish for a positive outcome or to reverse pessimism. Jamaicans, except for criminals, hope that violent crime and political corruption will end. However, hope alone cannot bring an end to these problems. Personally, I am sure Ms. Simpson-Miller’s “restore hope” message will be just another feel good political message. What Jamaicans want is a clear message on how these problems are going to be fixed. By the way if the govt. involvement with MP&P is so egregious why doesn’t the PNP leadership demand a commission of inquiry or a Truth & Reconciliation Commission?

Gun amnesty won’t work, say PMI officials

Observer Monday Exchange

BY INGRID BROWN Observer senior reporter browni@jamaicaobserver.com

Tuesday, September 14, 2010

David Armstrong
9/14/2010

This is another reason why nothing gets fixed. Everybody is an expert on what will work and what won’t work. I am not an expert on why a gun amnesty in JA would not work. What I do belive is that gun amnesty will work if the right conditions are in place to support it. Conditions that will force riminals to weigh their options. The idea that if 600 guns are recovered and 400 kept is not successfull is stupid. If one illegal gun is recovered that is a success.

PMI helped slash murder toll, says official

Observer Monday Exchange

BY INGRID BROWN Observer senior reporter browni@jamaicaobserver.com

Tuesday, September 14, 2010

David Armstrong
9/14/2010

I hope that this PMI group is an independent group that is not under the influence or control of any political party. So this group wants to take credit for a hypothetical situation by saying that had it not being for their intervention JA’s murder toll would have been some 1,300 more than was reported last year. This claim is baseless and does not make the PMI a credible organization. Any credit for reducing the murder rate should be backed up by verifable statistical data and by a report.

COLUMNS

More sex, please, we’re Jamaicans

Lloyd B Smith

Tuesday, September 14, 2010

David Armstrong
9/14/2010

When I saw the title of this column my first reaction was that mr. Wignall is writing about his favourite subject again. Yes indeed Jamaica is a sex crazed country . Maybe its the food, the climate, the beautiful women, or the music. Whatever it is Jamaicans love their sex. You alluded to less sex helping the nation to become more prosperous and enlightened. That’s a good point because sex is not only physiological it is also psychological. Less sexal energy means more energy for other things.

Ellington ‘disturbed’ about recent attacks against police

Wednesday, September 15, 2010

David Armstrong
9/15/2010

The Commissioner is rightly disturbed especially since the government dont‘ seems to care about this problem. I don’t see one politician, including, the PM, the leader of the Opposition addressing this problem or even offering their support and condolence to the fallen officers family. This is shameful and disgraceful especially when you consider that the govt. was willing to protect Dudus. when the govt. does not show its support for the police it sends the wrong message to criminals

Kweli Simba
9/15/2010

@ David Armstrong: Just because the political leaders are not at the funerals or making statements of condolences doesn’t mean they don’t care. It is the cops first responsibility to always protect themselves. In a war environment the participants must be vigilant. The policeman’s fight against criminality is never over, he is a marked man as he goes about his duties. No one keeps a party when an officer has fallen. It should therefore not be politicized at all no matter our convictions.

Bruce vs Brady – PM says lawyer no longer a JLP member

Not true, counters attorney at centre of Manatt affair

BY INGRID BROWN Observer senior reporter browni@jamaicaobserver.com

Wednesday, September 15, 2010

David Armstrong
9/15/2010

How long is the PM going to subject Jamaicans to this disgraceful Dudus and M&PP affair. Some Jamaicans want him to move on and focus on the nations business. He cannot do this if he continues to challenge people and try to defend himself against the charges. Doing so is a waste of time because his credibility is shot. What is needed to put closure this whole problem is a Commission of Inquiry. And because the corruption is endemic across the political system, a Truth & Reconciliation Commission is the right method to bring closure to this mess.

David Armstrong
9/15/2010

This is exactly why there must be a Commission of Inquiry. And because the corruption is endemic across the political system, a Truth & Reconciliation Commission is the right method to bring closure to this mess. Without either of this commision the Dudus/MP&P issue is going to continue as the PM is doing.

David Armstrong
9/15/2010

Shame and scandal in the family. After getting Mr. Brady to do his dirty work, the PM is now ready to throw him under the bus. Seems like the PM is practicing a little Machiavellian politics…when your friends are no longer useful eliminate them.

David Armstrong
9/15/2010

What kind of idiocy is this when people suggests that the PM/govt. should move on. Move on to where more corruption. The political system is rife with corruption and needs to be fixed. The Dudus/MPP issue is just the tip of the iceberg. The whole core of the political needs to be fixed. Since their is no replacement right now for the current crop of politicians they must be held accountable for cleaning up this mess they have created. We must demand that they do this.

‘The don is dead’

PMI officer says concept of community enforcer becoming extinct

BY KARYL WALKER Online editor walkerk@jamaicaobserver.com

Thursday, September 16, 2010

David Armstrong
9/16/2010

I hope this PMI group is not a mouthpiece for the PNP. Mr. Hutchinson certainly says a lot of things that have not been substantiated or officially verified independently. The things he talks about appear to be outside the scope of his organization charter or expertise. Take for example: gun amnesty will not work, their intervention has reduced crime by some hypothetical number, and now the don is extinct. Saying the don is extinct might just be the thing the politicians wants to hear so that they don’t have to do anything about garrison constituencies.

COLUMNS

Clean house first before you criticise, Sergeant Wilson

Mark Wignall

David Armstrong
9/16/2010

Mr. Wignall you are doing a heck of a job (if I may borrow Pres Bush’s comments to the FEMA director) by your insightful and honest column. You are right Sgt. Wilson should have addressed the corruption in their house too. As the saying goes if you live in a glass house don’t throw stones. Considering the egregious act that the govt. committed with their involvement with Dudus, Sgt. Wilson can be excused for his outburst. I think the police are victims of trickle down corruption which flows from the govt down through all levels of the society.

Ulem Scott

9/16/2010

@David Armstrong. This article also reminds me of that Bush statement but for another reason Bush was praising Brown the FEMA director for doing a great job while it was obvious to everyone that he was doing a lousy job. This article’s criticisms should be directed to the commissioner of police and not the Sgt. It is the commissioner who has the power and authority to implement policies to rid the force of the corrupt practices you complain about. It is damned if you do and damned if you don’t

OCG knocks ministry’s response to contract probe

Thursday, September 16, 2010

David Armstrong
9/16/2010

Chuck Emanuel I concur. These politicians need a course in Ethics 101, especially since it seems like we are stuck with them. What we have here is “Trickle Down Corruption” (see my comments on Wignall’s Column) that has permeated the entire society. The result of this is more crime, indiscipline, and apathy. What is disturbing is that we have a lot of people suggesting that they move on. Move on to what more corruption. No you can’t move on until you clean your house. It is as simple as that.

EDITORIAL

Mr Greg Christie and Ms Paula Llewellyn

Thursday, September 23, 2010

David Armstrong
9/23/2010

Obviously Mr. Christie is a well trained professional man with an independent and patriotic mind. Jamaica today needs more people to follow his example of dedication to the service of his country. In this climate of culture that breeds violent crime, corruption, and people like Dudus it requires great courage, conviction, and principles to do what Mr. Christie is doing. It is disturbing that the agencies listed as offenders in not taking action to his recommendations have not been responsive.

COLUMNS

The cosmetic engineering by the PNP

Mark Wignall

David Armstrong
9/23/2010

I just spent 5 days in St. Lucia and couldn’t help but noticing some major differences between this small island and JA. St. Lucia has a more discipline culture with significantly less crime, no loud music, and politicians who seems to care more about their country and image to foreigners. The things that are positives in St. Lucia are negatives in JA. As for the PNP rebranding themselves as a new party I don’t believe that is possible. If the current leadership is not willing to take a stand against crime and corruption then I don’t see how they will do any better that the current administration.

COLUMNS

Portia, we are still waiting

Chris Burns

David Armstrong
9/27/2010

Most Jamaicans by now should be tired of the political rhetoric and empty promises that their political leaders constantly make. What we are getting is the same old leadership that is trying to rebrand itself as the only hope for JA. Unfortunately, this is not going to work because the political leadership still lacks the passion, integrity, and commitment to improve the conditions in JA. Jamaica is now at critical point in its history where it is faced with two options – continue to move along the same path to gloom and doom or change course for the better. I want to see actions put in place and not just hear spoken words of promises and hope.

Progressive Agenda not the manifesto, says PNP

By HG HELPS Editor-at-Large helpsh@jamaicaobserver.com

Tuesday, September 28, 2010

David Armstrong
9/28/2010

This is the problem I see with these political parties: everything they do is geared towards an election. And if that is not bad enough they try to deceive and confuse people with fancy terms. Whether it is a progressive agenda or manifesto neither has any bearing on the real problems that need immediate attention. If they do then now is the time to implement them and not wait until a general election. The opposition party should initiate changes now and not wait until they are in power.

Old problems threatening global progress, Golding tells UNGA

CMC

Tuesday, September 28, 2010

David Armstrong
9/28/2010

Sometimes I get the impression that politicians are nothing more than actors. Give them a script that will make them look good and they will give an Oscar winning performance. And because they are actors they have no real commitment or passion to the real problems that affect the people they serve. This is why Mr. Golding can address the problems of the world and make pompous speech about world poverty and inequality. Yet he cannot seem to solve the problems in his own backyard. What a sham.

PNP: Integrity Commission is no joke

PNP will place much weight on Integrity Commission recommendations

BY HG HELPS Editor-at-Large helpsh@jamaicaobserver.com

Tuesday, September 28, 2010

David Armstrong
9/28/2010

This Integrity Commission was formed to vet candidates to determine their suitability to run in an election. Is this enough to address the problem of corruption that has contaminated the political system? My answer is absolutely not. The problem is that the incumbent politicians lack integrity. If this was not true they would have condemned and disassociate themselves from the garrison politics and corruption. They would also seek to reform the broader political system rather than the superficial attempt to clean up their corner. So if you screen in candidates with integrity eventually they will lose their integrity by association with corrupt politicians. The PNP Integrity Commission should also look at the integrity of their incumbents.

COLUMNS

Harvest of words cannot feed the hungry

BY ERNEST COREA

Wednesday, September 29, 2010

David Armstrong
9/29/2010

Institutions like the World bank and the IMF have by their policies help to maintain the poverty of Third World countries. Their policies with respect to the conditions they impose on these poor countries are a kind of economic slavery.

PNP 60 % ready for election

BY HG HELPS Editor-at-Large helpsh@jamaicaobserver.com

Wednesday, September 29, 2010

David Armstrong
9/29/2010

The Opposition party has not advocated one position or initiated any action towards ameliorating the social problems affecting the country. Yet they are 60% ready for an election. They had a great opportunity to take the moral high ground on corruption and garrison politics but they did not have the leadership savvy and courage to do so. Presumably they were reluctant to do so because of their culpability in these problems. They need to work towards proposing solutions rather than towards an election. Their plan reminds me of the boxer who goes for the knock out but instead end up losing the fight.

Flood damage to impact budget, warns PM

BY ALICIA DUNKLEY Senior staff reporter dunkleya@jamaicaobserver.com

Thursday, September 30, 2010

David Armstrong
9/30/2010

It appears that planning for natural disasters like hurricanes and flooding are not considered in the budget. If this is the case then this would be poor planning on the part of the govt. Considering that JA is vulnerable to these natural disasters funds should be established to help reduce the economic impact. Since the IMF imposes criteria on indicators to meet I hope they consider the impact these natural disasters have on the economy.

EDITORIAL

Lest we forget how fragile we are

Friday, October 01, 2010

David Armstrong
10/1/2010

The corruption of the political system and the self serving interest of politicians can be attributed to the failure to ensure the integrity of the infrastructure and to deal effectively with social problems. These two problems errode the effectiveness of the government or the political system to plan and to implement necessary actions to prevent the deterioration of the infrastructure and social problems plaguing the country.

David Armstrong
10/1/2010

The failure to ensure the integrity of the country’s infrastructure is perhaps a symptom of poor governance, poor planning, and corruption. Corruption especially is responsible for funds that could have been allocated to fix roads and bridges being diverted to other unjustifiable sources. How is the country suppose to preserve the integrity of its infrastructure from natural disasters when man-made disasters like rampant corruption remains an obstacle to progress and development?

Church fed up with ‘madness’ in Jamaica

Churches on course to promoting renewal in Ja

BY NADINE WILSON Sunday Observer staff reporter wilsonn@jamaicaobserver.com

Sunday, October 03, 2010

David Armstrong
10/3/2010

The church is preaching to the choir concerning the social problems affecting the country. while they are genuininely concerned about thse problems like most of us, they must go into the trenches to fight the evil the sources of these problems. They can do this in two ways: 1) go into communities where gangs and crime are rampant and try to inspire (not convert) the gang bangers to change their life style and 2) speak truth to power concerning corruption in high places of power.

God Bless
10/3/2010

The church is an activity base organisation void of accomplishments. They continue to confuse the activities with accomplishments which as elude this organisation from its inception. I agree with D Armstrong get into the trenches and inspire not convert.

EDITORIAL

Repeating ourselves

Monday, October 04, 2010

David Armstrong
10/4/2010

The failure to respond to natural and man-made disasters effectively can be attributed to one word incompetence. To be reasonable these problems require meeting formidable challenges in the form of planning, economic and human resources. These challenges seem to be unattainable because of poor planning or the lack of it. The problem of corruption in the political system also makes it difficult to deal with these problems effectively. The health and safety of the public seems to be a low priority as too many people are being killed by gunmen, freak accidents, or by natural disasters.

‘Tear down Arnett, Tivoli, Spanish Town’

Ex-Operation Pride boss wants new focus for inner-city communities

BY HG HELPS Editor-at-Large helpsh@jamaicaobserver.com

Monday, October 04, 2010

David Armstrong
10/4/2010

Mr. Buchanan’s idea to dismantle these communities in order to revitalize them is a bit lofty and does not seem. I am not an expert on urban development and revitalization but my common sense tells me that the conditions we are dealing with are not conducive to the kind of revitalization Mr. Buchanan is proposing. The obstacles to his plan are that residents would relocate voluntarily and their negative mind set of the people. Relocating people with a negative mindset means they take their baggage with them. Any solution to these troubled communities must start with a cultural change of attitudes and by the politicians undoing their creation of the garrisons.

Ex-senator bats for ‘dons’

Says preventing them from accessing State contracts, without reform measures, will worsen crime

Tuesday, October 05, 2010

David Armstrong
10/5/2010

One thing I am beginning to realize is that many Jamaicans have all kinds of crazy ideas to solve the social the social problems affecting the country. Yesterday it was to relocate the people who live in the garrison constituencies today it is to make govt. contracts accessible to dons. This new idea is like rewarding bad behavior. It seems to me that this idea would let the politicians off the hook because it would enable them to maintain their support of their dons. No! dons and gang members do not deserve preferential treatment. Go back to the drawing board sir and come back with a better plan.

EDITORIAL

So what if politicians buy homes, health services overseas?

Tuesday, October 05, 2010

David Armstrong
10/5/2010

Politicians by being public servants are subjected to broad scruting and criticisms even in their private lives. They have to answer to these criticisms whether it is reasonable or not. Politicians like Mr. Shaw has the right to buy foreign services or goods. However, the risk they run in doing so is the negative perception it cast. That perception is the lack of confidence in the country they represent. If Mr. Shaw opted for foreign medical services not available in JA then I see no problem.

EDITORIAL

Wasting money and risking lives on the Gorge

Wednesday, October 06, 2010

David Armstrong
10/6/2010

As far as I can remember the approach to dealing with the Rio Cobre gorge was a bandaid approach. No real planning or effective maintainence work has been done to reduce the flooding problem. The river is usually full of debris and this along with the large boulders impede the flow causing quick flooding during a deluge. There is a lot of hydro energy that could be converted to electricity. This was done in the old days until they had an accident when people were cleaning the pipe.

COLUMNS

Politics of poverty

HENLEY MORGAN

David Armstrong
10/6/2010

Sometimes I get the impression that politicians are nothing more than actors. Give them a script that will make them look good and they will give an Oscar winning performance. And because they are actors they have no real commitment or passion to the real problems that affect the people they serve. This is why Mr. Golding can address the problems of the world and make pompous speech about world poverty and inequality. Yet he cannot seem to solve the problems in his own backyard. What a sham.

Gov’t agencies flout the law

Majority fail to file annual reports to Parliament

BY ALICIA DUNKLEY Observer senior reporter dunkleya@jamaicaobserver.com

Wednesday, October 06, 2010

David Armstrong
10/6/2010

What does the PM expect in a climate that is rife with corruption and discipline problems. If the govt.
itself is plagued by corruption why does he expect the govt. agencies to behave in a discilined and professional manner. Corruption withing the political system is what the OCG is waging his one man fight against. The PM must know that when you lead by example people will follow and do what is expected. The delinquency that the PM is bemoaning could be a symptom of poor leadership.

Wa Tch
10/6/2010

@David Armstrong you have it right. This man is hamstrung by his own actions. As long as he continues in office the distractions will continue. He is just limping along faced with disrespect and a group of misguided followers. Labourites need to rid their party of this man. Find somebody else who can give some stability and command respect.
A Word of Caution: that man is NOT Vaz.

David Armstrong
10/6/2010

I have a hard time understanding the mentality of people who follow their political party blindly. This seems to be human nature as it is a universal problem. If people would only put the interest of their country first regardless of which party is in power there would be better accountability from politicians and more progress. Hitler committed the worst atrocities that a political leader could ever imagine all because the Germans followed him blindly. JA first should be our mantra.

COLUMNS

Are we doomed to live with poor roads?

Mark Wignall

David Armstrong
10/7/2010

Mr. Wignall, if I may answer your headline question, it is not only poor roads that we are doomed to live with. There are a number of things that it seems like we are doomed to live with: corruption in the political system; out of control gunmen; garrison constituencies with their dons; high unemployment rate; and lack of good political leadership. These problems that have affected every nook and cranny of JA and have prevented the country to make the progress it is capable of making.

EDITORIAL

To be poor is indeed a crime

Friday, October 08, 2010

David Armstrong
10/8/2010

The condition of poverty exists for three basic reasons: a natural process (such as being born into it); the inability or lack of desire to find opportunities; and the negative actions of those who hold power over them. If being poor is a crime then the crime must be attributed to the last reason. It is a crime when people exploit and neglect the plight of the poor. Not only are does it violate moral laws it also violates spiritual laws. Politicians usually are guilty of the exploitation and abuse of the poor simple because the poor has no voice or power. The only use the politicians have for the poor is to get their vote which they do on false promises.

EDITORIAL

Where there is no vision, the people perish…

Monday, October 11, 2010

David Armstrong
10/11/2010

The word plan is another popular word that politicians like to use to show that they promise to do something. Oftentimes these plans stay on the shelf and become another archive document. The real problem I see is not so much with the plans and manifestos that both political parties present but with the real lack of leadership. Regardless of how good the plan sound if strong political leadership is missing the plan is not likely to get implemented. What JA needs now is a plan start a cultural revolution that will change the mindset to a positive one that does not tolerate crime, corruption, and indiscipline. This will take strong and visionary political leadership to do…right now that leadership does not exist.

EDITORIAL

You’re 100 per cent right, Mr Wong!

Tuesday, October 12, 2010

David Armstrong
10/12/2010

The editorial is another example of editorials that have questionable quality and professionalism. An editorial should include facts and opinions based on facts. The statement “We do not know if this was just bravado from [an] stressed-out CEO.” That statement is an assumption and as such should not be included in an editorial. For previous editorials I have seen redundant paragraphs, spelling errors, and tabloid like headlines. A previous criticism about these problems was not posted. Back to this editorial, it draws attention to a problem that is probably why the quality of the roads is in poor condition.

Golding: I am no Green Card holder

Tuesday, October 12, 2010

David Armstrong
10/12/2010

In the grand scheme of things as they relate to the ability of the PM to be an effective leader this matter is a minor issue. Having said that let me say this. Many people, especially his die hard supporters, think that the PM is being subjected to too much criticism and we should shut-up, move on, and let him do his job. The truth of the matter is that the PM is responsible for these criticisms and they are rightly justified. JA has reached a critical point with respect to crime and corruption. These problems if not addressed by the govt. will only get worse and ultimately sink JA. The PM if he wants to avoid these criticisms must show that he is a strong leader who can govern firmly and courageously to restore some of the problems that he has caused.

Cleaning up the Manatt mess

PM yields to pressure for commission of enquiry into ‘Dudus’ affair

BY ALICIA DUNKLEY Senior staff reporter dunkleya@jamaicaobserver.com

Wednesday, October 13, 2010

David Armstrong
10/13/2010

This is welcome news that we have been calling for from day 1. I am anxious to see who will be selected for the commission because its effectiveness will depend on the experience and independent mind of the members. The only criticism I have with the commission of enquiry is that it will focus only on the Dudus/MPP affair. These two related problems resulted from the larger problem of garrison constituency politics which involves both political parties. For this reason I would have preferred to see a Truth and Reconciliation Commission because that would have looked at the corruption of the entire political system. It would also neutralize the ability of any one party claiming the moral high ground and political advantage. I hope the commission of enquiry will help bring some closure to an unfortunate event.

David Armstrong
10/13/2010

For those cynics who think that a commission of inquiry is a waste of time or a waste of tax payer’s money let me give you an analogy. If you buy a used car from a used car dealer and you get a lemon and come to suspect that the dealer deliberately lied to you about the car what would you do? Would you take actions to recover your money, expose the dealer, or would you fold up and move on? A sensible person would do the first two things. Similarly, when someone in authority like the PM commits an egregious problem and then try to cover it up that person must be held accountable through an official investigation. This is what the commission of inquiry will do.

Editorial

Blind to our rich culture

David Armstrong
10/13/2010

Dancehall music has definitely polluted the cultural landscape of JA as it glamorizes violence, hatred, and sexual debauchery. Music is a key component to any culture as demonstrated by its powerful influence on people’s behavior. Consequently, if music like dancehall music has lyrics that appeal to the dark side of people’s mind then we see manifestation of indiscipline, crime, corruption, and hatred. Jamaica does not need dancehall music that portrays the country negatively or contributes to social disorder. With respect to people not being aware of people who contribute to their cultural heritage that problem is due to the lack of promotion by social institutions, govt. and the media. I don’t see the Observer writing about any of the old artists people mentioned in the editorial.

Chang fed up with shoddy work after pipe-laying

Kimmo Matthews

Thursday, October 14, 2010

David Armstrong
10/14/2010

This is another example of how political corruption results in poor quality results. Because of political corruption supporters of a political party with no skills or proven track record in heavy construction work are given jobs as

contractors. Based on a recent OCG report these so called contractors get lucrative government contracts without a bid. This is exactly how Dudus accumulated his wealth and was able to set up his contractor business. This disgraceful practice of giving contracts to unqualified companies or entities must stop and it must be exposed. Any political party that allows this to continue must be exposed and held accountable for this disgraceful and corrupt practice.

EDITORIAL

Viva Chile, no mas — no to underground mining!

Thursday, October 14, 2010

David Armstrong
10/14/2010

The Chilean rescue operation of the miners holds lots of lessons for countries all over the world. One lesson that I believe JA can learn from is that of effective leadership of the govt. This leadership was demonstrated in the quick response to plan and coordinate the rescue effort. Two things that struck me were: 1) the President and his wife stayed at the site throughout the entire rescue operation and greeted all the miners and the rescue workers 2) was the indomitable spirit of the miners and the people who demonstrated patriotism and discipline. I hope our political leaders and the Jamaican people will draw some inspiration from the Chilean mining rescue to work together and to do what is right for the good of the country.

EDITORIAL

Ambition should be made of sterner stuff…

Friday, October 15, 2010

David Armstrong
10/15/2010

This editorial is too generalized in that it does not identify specific problems or failures of ambassadors appointed by the JA government to foreign countries. It is hard to determine what specific problem or impact the failure of ambassadors has had on Jamaica. It is almost a universal practice for governments to appoint their ambassadors on the basis of political favoritism or financial contributions the appointees make to the political party. If there are specific problems or failure that you are aware then perhaps you should point this out in a future editorial.

‘Bruce must testify’

Phillips says PM must be heard at commission of enquiry into ‘Dudus’ affair

BY ERICA VIRTUE Sunday Observer writer virtuee@jamaicaobserver.com

Sunday, October 17, 2010

David Armstrong
10/17/2010

Where is this quetion about whether the PM will testify at the commission of enquiry into the Dudus/MPP affair coming from? Did the PM indicate that he would not testify? If that is so it would be a terrible waste of time to go

through with this process. There should be no question about whether he will testify or not. He cannot exempt himself from this enquiry because he is made decisions before, during, and after the Dudus extradition to the US.

EDITORIAL

In a time when heroes are few…

Monday, October 18, 2010

David Armstrong
10/18/2010

To many young Jamaicans and maybe even some older ones their heroes are If you ask Jamaica today has plenty of heroes Vybz Kartel, Bounty Killer, Movado, and Buju Banton. These are the Dancehall entertainers some of who get recognition from high places. One columnist even said that Buju Banton was a hero an indication of how much adulation and cult like worship thy get. Heroes should be people who demonstrate extraordinary feats of leadership, bravery, or achievement that produce a positive impact or inspiration to their country. I am not aware that these entertainers do that.

COLUMNS

The commission of inquiry is a premature victory

Chris Burns

David Armstrong
10/18/2010

“Mrs Simpson Miller’s statement was particularly useful, because it exposed the enormity of the damage done to Jamaica and spoke candidly…….and restore our trust in the political leadership of Jamaica.” Her statement does not provide any leadership on her part because every Jamaicans already knows this. She and her party are also not exempt or clean with respect to garrison politics. If anything I would say that garrison politics became stronger during the 18 years the PNP was in power. I would have expected both the PM and the Opposition Party Leader to once and for denounce garrison politics and follow-up with actions to eradicate it completely. Dudusgate is a symptom of this sordid garrison politics and both parties are accountable.

EDITORIAL

Let’s not win the crime battle but lose the war

Tuesday, October 19, 2010

David Armstrong
10/19/2010

Your editorial failed to include the influence of garrison politics on crime. Garrison politics enabled the emergence of men like Dudus to control constituencies and ply their criminal activities. The politicians empowered these dons to satisfy their political agenda. In essence they created a Frankenstein monster that metaphorically fathered other monsters that we now see ravaging the island. Because the govt. and the opposition party are so entrenched in this garrison politics, they are afraid to slay this monster. That is why the govt. post-Tivoli crime plan is not being implemented. Another source that you failed to mention is the violent lyrics of Dancehall music that is like blood to vampires. Some of the reasons you cite for crime are not completely responsible for the pervasive brutal crime.

COLUMNS

The descent into indiscipline

LLOYD B SMITH

David Armstrong
10/19/2010

Yes indeed the PM and the Opposition Leader should step aside if they cannot tackle the serious social problems that are crippling the country. In these extraordinary times when barbaric criminals roam the island slaughtering people and even police at will extraordinary actions are needed. Both leaders lack the courage and fortitude to implement such measures. What kind of leaders are they when they conduct the affairs of the country as if everything is normal and clearly it is not.

David Armstrong
10/19/2010

Mr. Smith you hit the nail on the head in your statement “…our politicians are the main culprits, because over the years they have extolled indiscipline, corruption, illegality and disorderliness as a way of life.” I just posted a comment to today’s editorial because the editor failed to include the actions of politicians as a major cause to crime and all the social problems plaguing the country. There is no doubt that garrison politics breed and influences crime corruption, and indiscipline. And because this vile quasi-political process is sanctioned by the political leaders they are afraid to cut its umbilical cord.

‘Dudus’ enquirers named

Opposition left out in the cold, despite PM’s promise

BY ALICIA DUNKLEY Senior staff reporter dunkleya@jamaicaobserver.com

Wednesday, October 20, 2010

David Armstrong
10/20/2010

The selection of the Dominica-born attorney-at-law Emil George QC to lead the three man Commission of Inquiry seems like a good choice at first glance. He is well experienced in the area of inquires and tribunal work. However, I am a little suspicious about his selection because he has had a long standing relationship with the JLP party. In 1991 he represented the JLP in Supreme Court case of the JLP vs. Pearnel Charles. The PM was then the Chairman of the party. In 1997 he represented Seaga (when he was the Leader of the Opposition) in a lawsuit filed by Leslie Harper then Commissioner of Police. What this tells me is that although Mr. George was an independent senator, he is the attorney that the JLP runs to when they are in trouble. I am not sure if he will be able to perform his function without any JLP bias. We will see.

David Armstrong
10/20/2010

The commission has been instructed by the PM to submit their report and recommendations to the Governor General by February 28 2011. The concern with this is that the Gov. General has no real authority according to the constitution to do anything with the recommendations. Every reference for the Gov. General in the constitution states the following: “Governor General acting on the recommendation of the Prime Minister” and “acting on the advice of the Judicial Service Commission.” While I believe that a Commission of Inquiry is absolutely necessary, I am a little skeptical about how effective the outcome will be.

christopher Isaacs
10/20/2010

David Amstrong ! do you even understand the purpose of a three man inquiry instead of a single man enquiry? Our scepticism is getting the better of us to a point where we are becoming paranoid. Some persons are mistakenly branding Mr George as a former JLP Senator, do you have questions of the man’s integrity or credibility?! let’s hear them or shut up!

In an atmosphere where political corruption is pervasive people have a right to be vigilant

against being hoodwinked by these corrupt politicians. What we have seen from day one with respect to Dudusgate is an effort to cover up this sordid mess. Instead of demonstrating real leadership and being forthright we get a long drawn out process that is designed to obfuscate and deceive people. This kind of leadership must not tolerated and the lackeys who wants to shut people up or to move on have no understanding what is at stake. Corruption must not allowed to go unchallenged it must be fought wherever it exist regardless of the powers that are involved.

COLUMNS

The EU’s capital punishment abolitionist movement

ANTHONY GOMES

David Armstrong
10/20/2010

The statement “Jamaica strongly supports capital punishment, but has not carried out an execution for many years because of restrictions…… by rulings of the UK Privy Council. Unlike Barbados, Trinidad and Tobago and Guyana, Jamaica has not yet moved through constitutional change to neutralise the restriction on the death penalty for executions to proceed” points to what I believe is the lack of political leadership. The death penality needs to be reinstated to take care of the barbarians.

Shaw adamant wage freeze will remain in place

Thursday, October 21, 2010

David Armstrong
10/21/2010

The saying a picture is worth a thousand words is so appropriate for the picture. Notice the puzzling body language that the other ministers and PM are showing as the Minister speaks. Mr. Holness is scratching is forehead, Mr. Baugh’s forehead is wrinkled, Mr. Tufton is looking on in awe, and the gentleman beside him is not buying what the Minister is selling. As for the PM he seems to be sleeping as his head is bowed.

COLUMNS

Is the prime minister flying on autopilot?

MARK WIGNALL

David Armstrong
10/21/2010

Mr. Wignall your column as usual is interesting and informative. However, the comparison between the PM and Michael Manley is like comparing donkeys with horses. First Michael Manley was a strong, bold, and courageous leader. He was not afraid to take on powerful forces in his visionary endeavors to implement revolutionary changes. . Yes he made some mistakes along the way and he did some unpopular things but he was passionate about what he believed and he had principles and integrity. I wish I could say the same things about the PM.

David Armstrong
10/21/2010

I am going to predict that the commission’s report will be favorable to the PM but will be critical of party executives

for “misguiding the PM” to make the decisions he did. I am basing my predictions on two things: First, Commission of enquires that investigates a government or powerful entity rarely if ever is unfavorable to them. Second, the Commissioner, Mr. Emil George has had a long relationship with the JLP and has defended Mr. Seaga and the Party in lawsuits against them. Since he is the go to attorney for the JLP I think he will be favorable to them. Although I see these potential problems with the enquiry I still feel it is the right tool to officially investigate this mess for the records.

PAJ ‘alarmed’ at Warmington’s comments

Thursday, October 21, 2010

David Armstrong
10/21/2010

Mr. Warmington behavior is akin a schoolboy bully. As an MP he should be more sophisticated in his criticisms instead of acting like a hooligan who is trying to intimidate those who criticize him. Maybe he thinks that because of his political position he is privileged to bully anyone who criticizes him. Case in point he called the OCG an idiot and now he is labeling the press as being dishonest. For a politician to be so arrogant in these times is not being very smart and the political system already rife with corruption certainly does not need this kind of politician.

EDITORIAL

‘Who the cap fit…’

Friday, October 22, 2010

David Armstrong
10/22/2010

I don’t understand this effort of wanting people to demit office because of their age. This seems to me to be age discrimination. The single criteria for wanting a person to demit office are if they are not performing their duties effectively. Just because someone is old as Methuselah is not a good reason to force them to quit. Many old people in their job are still useful and functional. They have experience, insight, and wisdom that their younger counterparts don’t have. Having old people in political office or any other office is not the cause of the problems that are affecting the country. It is poor political leadership and let’s face it both political leaders are still relatively young.

Thwaites wants commission to probe link between parties, gangs

Thwaites wants ‘Dudus’ commission to probe link between political parties, gangs

Friday, October 22, 2010

David Armstrong
10/22/2010

This is exactly why all along I have posted comments advocating the use of a Truth and Reconciliation Commission (TRC) to look into the broader problem of garrison politics corruption of the political system. Both political parties have sanctioned and benefited from garrison politics. Dudusgate is a byproduct of this evil system that they have created and nurtured. That is why it is hard for them to denounce it and to eradicate it. The TRC would have a broader scope than the Commission of Enquiry and would give both parties the opportunity to tell the truth. It is a powerful process that would facilitate confession and forgiveness. It has worked in Liberia, Rwanda, and South Africa. I am disappointed that our political leaders did not have the courage or wisdom to see that the TRC would have been the best method to start the remedial process of the political system.

EDITORIAL

You can’t eat your cake and have it too, ladies

Sunday, October 24, 2010

NOT POSTED BY THE OBSERVER

I am fed up with the JA for Justice group because they don’t offer any solution to the growing epidemic of barbaric gun crimes. From their privileged position they tend to advocate rights for criminals or people who run afoul of the law. It is one thing to advocate on behalf of people who have experienced human rights abuse but quite another for those who oppose the police, who are criminals, and who support criminals. Jamaicans for Justice is a joke because hundreds of innocent people are being killed by criminals and I don’t see them advocating against this, supporting the victims, or trying to get justice for them. Instead they seem to condemn the police every time they gun down criminals. We need solutions to the growing crime rate not encouragement to criminals or sending them the wrong message.

COLUMNS

Enquiry, inquisition, excuses, no ending

Sunday, October 24, 2010

NOT POSTED BY TH OBSERVER

Your column addresses six areas that allude to the broad scope and lack of details for the Commission of Enquiry. The nebulous nature of this Commission of Enquiry is of concern to many and appears to be hastily drafted for political expediency. Maybe the drafters know what they are doing by leaving out all the details – especially the scope and goals expected. The idiom “The devil is in the details” apply to this commission and unfortunately by leaving out the details will only fuel more speculation that will undermine the process. From day one I have advocated that a Truth and Reconciliation Commission (TRC) would be the best method of addressing the broad problem of garrison politics which established and which is sanctioned by both political parties.

Admiral Lewin slaps down PM Golding

Sunday, October 24, 2010

David Armstrong
10/24/2010

At least the admiral didn’t throw his shoe at him. But more seriously though, how is the Commission of Enquiry going to deal with the PM usurping the powers of the Justice dept. when he asserted that wiretap evidence was illegally passed to the United States, in breach of Coke’s constitutional rights. This was not PM’s call but somehow he felt the heat in the kitchen and wanted to get out.

David Armstrong
10/24/2010

Truth or consequences this is what the PM must face up to. The truth must be told or the PM must suffer the consequences. And for those of you who think this eggregious matter must be forgotten or we must shut up and simple move on you are condoning the corrupt political process that allowed Dudusgate to happen. If a patient is afflicted with cancer steps must be take to remove the cancer otherwise the patient will suffer and die. So far no one has been held accountable for Dudusgate.

COLUMNS

Who should lead the JLP?

Lloyd B Smith

David Armstrong
10/26/2010

I read your column with the anticipation of finding out who you think the pretenders to the throne would be. Since you did not name anyone I am assuming that you don’t see anyone in the party worthy of leadership status. After all if there was a heir apparent that person would be obvious. One of the problems with poor leaders of any organization is that they never seem to groom potential leaders to replace them. Maybe it’s their insecurity or inability to do so. Consequently, these leaders usually precipitate turmoil in their organization.

David Armstrong
10/26/2010

There should be only one political body of elected officials and they should work towards one objective and that is for the progress of people and the country. All political parties place their allegiance to the party first and country second and that is part of the problem. The allegiance of politicians should be to their country first. We certainly would not see the political squabble that does no good for the country. Look at what the Republicans are doing to President Obama. They don’t care if they bring the country to its knees as long as they can make him look bad so that they can reclaim power. In the long run it is the people who suffer. And some deserve to suffer because of the blind allegiance they give to their party.

COLUMNS

Feisty independent Emil George heads Coke’s extradition probe

By Ken Chaplin

Tuesday, October 26, 2010

David Armstrong

I don’t know if mr. Chaplain is the one who controls what get posted to his column. I have noticed that previous posts including one today don’t get posted. What’s the point of soliciting comments if you are afraid of critical postings.

David Armstrong
10/26/2010

The statement that the commissioners are not the kind of men who are going to be influenced by outsiders is an

opinion and not an objective opinion one. In this day and age when corruption is rife in politics no one knows who can be influenced or who cannot be. Credentials are not the criteria that make one immune from influence. You avoided any mention of his long relationship with the JLP party. This relationship raises questions on whether he will be independent in his investigation.

George Mack
10/26/2010

I must agree with David Armstrong that the author of this article carefully avoided the fact of Mr Emil George’s close affiliation with the JLP. So while EW comes across crass re the media we cant blame him when we think about the standard of reporting that we have.

Leave! And get a jacket or coat!

Warmington kicks civil servant out of Gordon House

BY ERICA VIRTUE Observer Writer Virtuee@jamaicaobserver.com

Tuesday, October 26, 2010

David Armstrong
10/26/2010

How come when mr. Christie tried to exposed his unethical practices he whined and call the OCG an idiot? i said in a previous post that this man is a bully. He believes he can use his political power and intimidate people. well there is a saying “duppy knows who to frighten.” What a sham…these politicians can discipline their own but they can’t discipline the thugs in their constituency and the criminals who roam the country slaughtering people.

COLUMNS

Golding’s personal commission?

Heart to Heart

Betty Ann Blaine

Tuesday, October 26, 2010

David Armstrong
10/26/2010

Betty Ann for a moment I forgot that you are the leader of JAs 3rd and new political party. Writing these columns doesn’t help your credibility as a political leader. You need to pick significant issues and address them on a wider platform that would give you more visibility. Anyhow back to your column: The PM did not outsmart anyone you can only do this to someone you think is smart. What he has done is to deceive the public because he thinks they are stupid. As for Mr. George heading the COE I posted d several comments about this to show his longstanding relationship with the JLP. He should have recluse himself from the COE on the ground of conflict of interest.

David Armstrong
10/26/2010

To condone corruption and ignore the democratic principle of holding people accountable for their corrupt and unethical behaviour is sadly lacking in JA. This is why the country cannot make good progress. It is why the infrastructure is poorly maintained. I have a hard time understanding the mentality of people who will defend politicians who are incompetent, ineffective, and corrupt. JA today is morraly, economically, and spiritual bankrupt because we have these type of politicians.

EDITORIAL 

Poor Mr Warmington, he has not a clue

Thursday, October 28, 2010

David Armstrong
10/28/2010

Here are the answers to “How he gets away with this behavior defies the imagination. Does he have someone’s secret?” 1) There is no real leadership in the party. Where there is no leadership you will find all kinds of societal problems like indiscipline, corruption, crime, etc. 2) The govt. is too preoccupied with how to survive from the fallout of Dudusgate and 3) Because the political system has been corrupted from garrison constituencies it is hard for that body to rein him because if you can tolerate dons why can’t they tolerate him.

Mr Skill
10/28/2010

@ David Armstrong…well put sir!

COLUMNS

No easy fix to Ja’s hard times and hopelessness

Mark Wignall

David Armstrong
10/28/2010

The fix to JA’s problems is that first and foremost the political leaders have to remove the mote of corruption from their eyes. This mote of corruption has taken away their vision to steer the country in right direction. This corruption has intoxicated them and consequently they behave like drunkards stumbling in the dark. Very unfortunate for the country that it has to suffer because of a corrupt political system.

Police get threats from criminals displaced in West Kingston

Thursday, October 28, 2010

David Armstrong
10/28/2010

We cannot afford to let criminals and thugs threaten the police. The police is the last resort for law and order and for preventing anarchy. This is totally unacceptable and the govt. needs to send a strong message to criminals that they (including their family members who aid and abet them) will be punished severely for any crimes committed against the police. It is time the govt. reinstate the death penality and make it mandatory for anyone who murdr a police officer…enuf is enuf

Seven die by the gun, five injured in bloody weekend

 Cops take out 3 alleged Clarendon gangsters

BY COREY ROBINSON Sunday Observer reporter robinsonc@jamaicaobserver.com

Sunday, October 31, 2010

David Armstrong
10/31/2010

When is this madness going stop?
When are Jamaicans going to demand actions from the government? 

When is the government going to make gun crime a top priority?
When is the government going to enact tough laws to make it harder for gunmen to kill with impunity?
When are Jamaicans going rally behind the police and give them the support they need?
It is full time that the government get out of its comfort zone and start fighting these gun criminals who brutally kill and terrorize people.

Wheel and come again, Phillips tells Golding on ‘Dudus’ enquiry

BY INGRID BROWN Sunday Observer senior reporter browni@jamaicaobserver

Sunday, October 31, 2010

David Armstrong
10/31/2010

This whole mess has become a big political football and it’s all because of the PM’s inability to make good decisions. The whole Dudus affair and now the potential controversy with the Commission of Enquiry (COE) could have been avoided by PM. As a political leader he should have been cognizant of the consequences of his decisions. He should have been aware that by protecting Dudus in the manner he attempted to do was not going to expose and left him politically naked. How could he name the commissioners of the COE without consulting the Opposition as he said he would?

David Armstrong
10/31/2010

For those who keep asking the question why a COE or to forget the Dudus matter and let the govt. move on and govern the country is simple not acceptable. There has to be some kind of oversight to officially document and put into the records what happened and why it happened. The explanation of the parties involved (in this case the PM and the govt. is not good enough). If the PM simple give us his word and say end of story then who is to say that he is not telling the full truth. Indeed it turned out that he lied about the MPP issue. Yes the COE will cost tax payers but in a democratic society there has to be oversight of govt. when they are reckless and irresponsible in their behavior.

Stunning admittance!

Mayor says disaster victims used for votes by both parties

By Ingrid Brown Observer Senior Reporter browni@jamaicaobserver.com

Monday, November 01, 2010

David Armstrong
11/1/2010

If what the mayor is saying is true then this is not only a disgrace it is immoral and evil. The first priority of any civilized government should be for public safety. Under no circumstances should people be allowed to live in an environment that is dangerous. Yes they are a few people who will defy anything to do what they want to do. In this case allowing a community to settle in an area that is hazardous just to ensure votes is criminal. I hope this is not true because if it is then political system is not only corrupt it is evil. And those politicians that maintain this corrupt and evil system have a lot of atoning to do.

What migration, remittances are doing to our societies

Monday, November 01, 2010

David Armstrong
11/1/2010

Mr. Patterson’s conclusion about migration and remittances lacks credibility. His conclusion is not supported by statistical data and appears to be just his opinion. As a former PM he should know better than that to make

statements that have no basis. As for the migration of qualified people like nurses the sole reason why this happen is because of lack of economic opportunities. During his long tenure as PM many qualified Jamaicans migrated to seek better opportunities elsewhere because of his failed economic policies.

David Mullings
11/1/2010

@David Armstrong
You do realize that between 1995 and 1999 the number of Jamaicans reported as living below the poverty level was cut in half right? (Source: The Road To Sustained Growth in Jamaica; A World Bank Study).
failed economic policies” hardly seems like the correct term for that achievement.
Aspects of policy did fail, yes, but Jamaicans will always migrate as long as the improvement is too slow

16-y-o student stabbed to death

Wednesday, November 03, 2010

David Armstrong
11/3/2010

The violence that is perpetrated in a society is a reflection of a serious problem at the core of that society. This is true especially when that violence is perpetrated by the youth. Our young people are committing too many murders with guns and knives at an unprecedented rate. What is even very disturbing is that some of these youths are high school students. The problem we have is that our social and political institutions have failed to provide the moral, social and religious values for the youth. The youth is the foundation on which a country is built and if that foundation is weak the country will perish.

Two-faced Jamaicans: Why are we better when overseas?

Monday, November 01, 2010

Read more: http://www.jamaicaobserver.com/editorial/#ixzz14GRYrEP3

David Armstrong
11/1/2010

Is the editor too sensitive about my comment why it’s not being posted. If that’s the case then you must be prepared to deal with critical comments to your editorial. My criticisms of your editorials are not intended to be personal as I have no clue who you are.

Not Published (see comments above)

I am not sure what the purpose of this editorial is. If it is to compare the behavior and lifestyle of Jamaicans in their country with that of Jamaicans living in foreign countries then the observations you have made are well known and simplistic. The simple answer to your question is: When in Rome you have to do as the Romans do. As for why Jamaicans tend to do better in foreign countries the answer is that there are more opportunities, a higher standard of living, more discipline, more accountability, and more educated people. These develop countries do not allow thugs, criminals, and ragamuffins to dictate social behavior.

‘Brother, be careful’

Sibling recalls last conversation with slain police officer

BY COREY ROBINSON Sunday Observer staff reporter robinsonc@jamaicaobserver.com

Sunday, November 07, 2010

David Armstrong
11/7/2010

How much longer must Jamaicans put up with gunmen committing their barbaric acts of violence? How much longer will the weak and self centered political leaders get some courage to work in a bipartisan manner to put these barbaric gunmen out of business? How can our political leaders sleep at night when people are brutally killed by these ruthless gunmen day after day? How can they sleep at night when the very policemen who are sworn by duty to protect us are being killed by gunmen?

Deep Corruption

BY ERICA VIRTUE Sunday Observer writer virtuee@jamaicaobserver.com

Sunday, November 07, 2010

[Not published]

The problem of misrepresentation of contractors that Mr. Christie is complaining about is the tip of the iceberg. Corruption is endemic throughout the society and starts at the highest level that is the government. The political system is completely corrupt and that is why we ended up with the Dudus mess. How can a government function with integrity, ethics, and morality when they have corrupted themselves? I don’t see one of these politicians including the two political party leaders encouraging or praising the gallant work that Mr. Christie is doing. That in itself tells you the rest of the story.

Police killings in St James sparks fiery protest

Horace Hines

Wednesday, November 10, 2010

David Armstrong
11/10/2010

Because the police have been demonized by many people especially those in communities where gunmen have been gunned down by the police, there is usually quick condemnation by protesters such as shown in this case. The problem I have with this type of protest is that more than likely none of the protesters were witness to the incident. These people could not give any reliable testimony in a court of law because there protest is based on hear say. What doesn’t make sense to me is that the report states that these were police in plain-clothed wearing mask and travelling in a taxi. This needs further investigation because I don’t think this is standard practice for the police unless maybe they are undercover police men.

EDITORIAL

What the T&T PM meant but did not say

Wednesday, November 10, 2010

David Armstrong
11/10/2010

This story doesn’t merit two consecutive editorials. There are more serious problems in JA like high incidence of gun violence, corruption, etc that your editorial should be harping on daily. The relationship between JA and Trinidad is akin to sibling rivalry. JA as the larger island and more well known on the international scene seems to motivate some jealousy and envy from Trinidad. Maybe JA has a superiority complex and Trinidad an inferiority complex which manifests itself in these insignificant issues.

COLUMNS

Strange encounters in Florence, Italy

FRANKLIN W KNIGHT

David Armstrong
11/10/2010

Maybe you had too much Chianti to drink Professor Knight and you got into some kind of fantasy trip – you were lonely and began thinking about female companionship. Perhaps too you were hallucinating from some kind of pollutant in the old building. By the way where did you get the baseball bat from? Did you take one with you to Florence? I don’t understand why one would be in that building.

MP says police endangering lives in violence-prone areas

Friday, November 12, 2010

David Armstrong
11/12/2010

OK so here we have a politician complaining about police actions in garrison constituencies and exposing people they apprehend and release to presumably the mercy of another rival garrison constituency. My initial thoughts on this are why is it that the politicians won’t take the responsibility to dismantle or eliminate the political influences that make these communities garrison constituencies. It is the politicians who have created these constituencies for their own selfish motive. That is why they will not take any action that will dismantle or condemn these garrison constituencies. Instead they are quick to demonize the police. Law makers should not demonize the police because in so doing they send the wrong message to the criminals in their constituencies.

COLUMNS

Britain holding the handle, Jamaica the blade

DIANE ABBOTT

NOT POSTED

In talking about the issue of Jamaican criminals in foreign jails being deported or considered for deportation, the alarming thing to note is that it appears that Jamaicans represent a higher per capita of the prison population in these jails. The number of Jamaicans in foreign jails should be also a concern and not just the proposed deportation itself. Our culture of violence has contributed to the idea that we are bad people and fear nothing. Many Jamaicans demonstrate this badness in public by being rude and by using bad words freely. This culture needs to be changed at home as it is currently responsible for the crime problem in JA.

Editorial

Third World the next superpower?

Sunday, November 14, 2010

NOT POSTED

China is destined to be the next and only superpower and this will happen in the next two decades. In recent times there were two super powers: the US and the USSR. The USSR collapsed and a similar process is going to happen in the US when the economy collapses. The writing is on the wall for the US as their social order is beginning to crack, the economy has been experiencing economic tremors, and fear and panic has started to set in. Meanwhile China is gradually emerging as an economic force and is beginning to spread its tentacles across the globe. China is the white horse in Revelation whose rider holds a bow, is given a crown and goes out as a conqueror bent on conquest.

EDITORIAL

Allegations against Mr Robertson demand urgency

Wednesday, November 17, 2010

David Armstrong
11/17/2010

Maybe I missed a previous news about this allegation that you say demands urgent attention. Nowhere in the editorial could I find aany info on what the allegations is or its nature. Even if the allegation was previously reported the editorial should still refere to it to give your editorial better context.

EDITORIAL

Political exorcism badly needed

Thursday, November 18, 2010

David Armstrong
11/18/2010

These allegations against politicians should not be a big surprise. When politicians associate with dons or undesirable members of their garrison constituencies it becomes easy to directly or indirectly get these thugs to do anything you want them to do. If you want them to eliminate your enemy just put the word out. This is why as the headline says a political exorcism is needed. The ties between politicians and dons must be broken. This means dismantling the garrison constituencies.

EDITORIAL

If we know what’s good for us…

Friday, November 19, 2010

David Armstrong
11/19/2010

Private companies are reluctant to tie up their capital in research and development (R & D) because the return on investment can take years. These companies generally rely on funds from grants or government to do their research. The government does not have the money to support R & D work and quite frankly, the Jamaican culture

is not oriented towards technological innovation and R & D work.

PL BOGLE
11/19/2010

@David Armstrong – “the Jamaican culture is not oriented towards technological innovation and R & D work.” I have to disagree with you on that statement because i am J’can & i was awarded a USA utility patent & I have another invention that is currently patent pending as we speak.. On the contrary I also have knowledge of many other J’cans, especially in the US that are inventors. Govt in the Caribbean region needs to create the environment & lucrative opportunities that will magnetize innovators & inventors to our region.

COLUMNS

Africa our body, Europe our mind — a winning history!

Franklin Johnston

David Armstrong
11/19/2010

Very interesting article. We are indeed conflicted by our history. As the title suggests we appreciate Africa like a son would for his mother. However, psychologically, we are influenced by sophisticated European behaviour. Most Jamaicans would prefer to visit a European country rather than an African country. Psychologically we have very little in common with Africa. Mr. Kofi is right we are slave babies. You are also right, Mr. Kofi is a chief by Skype (that is very funny).

Everton Welby
11/19/2010

@ Armstrong, I agree with you 100 percent when you say “Psychologically we have very little in common with Africa”…. Dont forget it.
As the saying goes, “every black man is not our enemy and every black man is not our friend’.

PM expected to break silence on ‘Robertson issue’ Sunday

BY ERICA VIRTUE Observer writer virtuee@jamaicaobserver.com

Friday, November 19, 2010

David Armstrong
11/19/2010

I find it perplexing when politicians make public statements of support for one of their members accused of a serious problem. What if the accused politician is guilty would they still make their public pronouncements of support? I doubt it. What is even more perplexing is that these politicians take the position that their accused colleague is innocent even before an investigation or court proceeding starts. My conclusion is that their reaction is probably an effort to influence investigators especially since they don’t seems to have the privilege anymore of interfering with the investigators. If the allegation of Mr. Robertson turns out to be true, I believe that the PM has no option but to resign.

christopher Isaacs
11/19/2010

Could david Armstrong please tell the rest of us bloggers how is he able to consistently and successfully oversubscribe the allowable number of characters. I have counted over 600! I probably am multiplying instead of adding so will someone please confirm or disabuse me of my folly.

David Armstrong
11/19/2010

Christopher Isaacs, I am sorry I cannot divulge my secret otherwise I would not get posted by the Observer. Is that waht you want? Actually I have no secret I just write the truth from my heart because I love Jamaica so dearly. I can’t

afford to defent corrupt polices from any source. Maybe its the truth that the Observer likes why they keep posting my comments (lol).

David Armstrong
11/19/2010

By the way Christopher Isaacs sometimes I don’t get my comments posted because I exceed the 500 word limit. This is very frustrating for me because it is very difficult to say serious things in less than 500 words. I don’t know if you did Precis in your elementary school days where you have to summarize several paragraphs into one pargaraphs. This is what the Observer is forcing me to do. I prefer the Gleaner format they are more less restrictive with thei comments.

OCG Says contractor not on approved list at time of fatal Barbican incident

BY ALICIA DUNKLEY Senior staff reporter dunkleya@jamaicaobserver.com

Friday, November 19, 2010

David Armstrong
11/19/2010

Not surprise about this. Too much corruption, lack of standards, lack or regulatory requirements for contractors, and lack of political leadership all contribute to this problem. All contractors should have a valid license to perform contarcting services and their procurement for contractual services should be based a proper bidding process that is approved by the authority in place to do so.

Colombia promises help in narco fight

BY ALICIA DUNKLEY Senior staff reporter dunkleya@jamaicaobserver.com

Saturday, November 20, 2010

David Armstrong
11/20/2010

From my perspective I would say the JA government needs more help in cleaning their house. Unless the corruption of the political system is cleaned up nothing else will matter. When politicians become corrupt then other problems like crime, drug trafficking, illegal firarm use, and indiscipline flourishes. The Dudus affair has shown us how corruption in the political system allows dons and illegal activities to flourish.

COLUMNS

Wind of change in the JLP and PNP

Dr Raulston Nembhard

David Armstrong
11/20/2010

The wind of change that decent law abiding Jamaicans want to see is that of both political parties decontaminating the toxic corruption that has contaminated the political system. This is their number one challenge and if they are not able to meet this challenge they will remain ineffective in dealing with the social problems and moving the country forward. Infusing young leadership in both parties is not the answer because if the political system is corrupt they will become corrupted too. What is needed is a passionate commitment from the young leaders and the current leaders to purge the political system of its corruption.

EDITORIAL

As the JLP emerges from its conference

Monday, November 22, 2010

David Armstrong
11/22/2010

Politicians know how to say the right things when they have a captive audience or zealous supporters. It is like preaching to the choir. What really matters is not the lofty speeches or how much they energized the crowd but what plan or actions they are going to implement to stop the out of control mayhem that gunmen are unleashing on the country. Jamaicans who believe in JA first want to see the PM touch tese problems and stop the madness that is destroying the country.

JLP leaders call for party unity

BY INGRID BROWN Observer senior reporter browni@jamaicaobserver.com

Monday, November 22, 2010

Read more: http://www.jamaicaobserver.com/news/JLP-leaders-call-for-party-unity_8176225#ixzz164E19dag

David Armstrong
11/22/2010

At the conference Mr. Samuda said: “”It’s the PNP we have to defeat…so we appeal to supporters in St James to set aside all differences and embrace each other and come together as one united force.” I beg to differ with you Mr. Samuda, it is the criminals and gunmen who are killing people and destroying the country that you and your party need to defeat.

COLUMNS

Robertson, MPP and Dudus – Three strikes, you’re out!

Franklin Johnston
Read more: http://www.jamaicaobserver.com/columns/Robertson-MPP-and-Dudus-Three-strikes-youre-out_8188167#ixzz16zXgDLNU

David Armstrong
11/26/2010

I disagree with you on the Bush part. However, you are entitle to your opinion. George Bush is a moron a phony and is responsible for creating a lot of problems not just in the US but all over the world. The problem in JA is not

that we don’t have politicians with the potential to be good leaders and who can solve problems. The problem is that the political system is corrupt and has rendered the politicans impotent in leading and fixing problems. The system needs to be purged now.

Talk up! – Police liken criminals to termites

Police encourage more involvement in revived neighbourhood watch programme

BY PATRICK FOSTER Observer writer fosterp@jamaicaobserver.com

Tuesday, November 30, 2010

11/30/2010

Destroying criminals as termites that can destroy a community is very true. This is why I believe part of the crimre fighting plan should include educating people about the damage criminals who infest their vommunity can do. People need to understand that if they want a safe and crime frre community they have to take the initiative and expose these criminals or make it difficult for them to live and operate in their community. It is the home owner’s rsponsibility to get rid of termites.

PNP concerned about ‘unilateral’ approach to JDF relocation

BY GARFIELD MYERS Editor-at-Large South/Central Bureau myersg@jamaicaobserver.com

Tuesday, November 30, 2010

David Armstrong
11/30/2010

The question I want to ask is what is the urgency of relocating the JDF? With more urgent matters at hand one would expect the govt. to focus more on such matters. Crime and corruption is the two most urgent problems that need attention and it appears that the govt. does not want to implement strong measures to fight these problems. Concerning the PNP’s criticism about the govt. acting on their own to make this decision I agree with them. Although I think the PNP is just as useless. God help JA.

EDITORIAL

Will a press complaint authority ever become reality?

Thursday, December 02, 2010

12/2/2010

What is wrong with these govt. functionaries or ministers? It seems like not a week can go by without one of them being embroiled in controversy. If it’s not the PM, its Warmington, Robertson, Vaz, and maybe I missed a few more. I have never seen a govt. with so many dysfunctional characters. These men should have respect for their office and the people they serve. As public servants they should be able to deal with criticisms. If they are too thin skinned then they are in the wrong business.

COLUMNS

The JLP is repositioning more than renewing itself

Mark Wignall

12/2/2010

All this talk about the Young Turks replacing their older counterparts has no merit and would provide no significant advantage to the governance of JA. The many problems affecting the country today has nothing to do with old politicians serving for a long time. It has more to do with leadership and competence. Many of these old politicians are not too bright to begin with (and I might add there are a few young ones too). The Young Turks while they might have more energy are not mature enough and don’t have the wisdom which comes with age to govern. They would become intoxicated with power too easily.

Jamaican scientist makes prostate cancer breakthrough

Dr Henry Lowe unveils formula that can eliminate deadly disease

BY VERNON DAVIDSON Executive Editor – publications davidsonv@jamaicaobserver.com

David Armstrong
12/3/2010

While this news is encouraging and might be very well be a breakthrough treatment for prostate cancer I think it is too early to celebrate. My concern is that there was no mention of clinical trials that would indicate the drug’s effect in the treatment of prostate cancer. The other concern I have is how do we know the semi-purified form will be effective since it would be available in a reduced dosage. I am sure people with medical background will have more questions on this brekthrough drug.

JDF move almost a done deal — Vaz

BY PATRICK FOSTER Observer writer fosterp@jamaicaobserve.com

Friday, December 03, 2010

David Armstrong
12/3/2010

Mr. Vaz’s title should be Minister of Misinformation as he seems to have a tendency of making conflicting or contradictory statements. In one breath he is saying that this is a done deal and in another breath he is saying that the move is still in the planning stages. The idea to free up lnd space for future development sounds good but there is no information on how this land will be developed. Is this another example of a govt. that is just winging it?

Deadly ‘cells’ – Hits still being ordered from prisons

Growing inmate cellphone use blamed

BY COREY ROBINSON Sunday Observer staff reporter robinsonc@jamaicaobserver.com

Sunday, December 05, 2010

David Armstrong
12/5/2010

This is not meant as a compliments to criminals but It seems like they are the only ones who can find creative ways to get things done. The govt. who is responsible for the safety of the public has certainly not come up with any creative measures to stop the barbaric killings that is happening almost on a daily basis with impunity. What is so sad is that the govt. and the opposition party spend so much time trying to score political points and pay little attention in trying to stop the insanity.

EDITORIAL

It’s full time now for the Caribbean Court of Justice

Tuesday, December 07, 2010

David Armstrong
12/7/2010

If the replacement of the UK Privy Council by the Caribbean Court of Justice (CCJ), will allow capital punishment to be restored in JA then I am all for it. If not then unless there are compelling reasons to do so then this should not be a priority at this time. I firmly believe that there are more urgent problems that need to be resolved. Fix your problem at home before you try to fix problems outside. To the statement “The Government, we believe, needs to move expeditiously to bring the necessary legislation to Parliament.” My response is don’t hold your breath.

‘Treasure’ denied bail

Tuesday, December 07, 2010

David Armstrong
12/7/2010

So this man that James Robertson paraded with on stage during the JLP conference seems to have a criminal background. This seems to be another case of where these high level politicians know these men or know how to get hold of them easily. This is another reason why garrison politics need to be purged from the political system. The majority of the high level politicians including the PM and the leader of the Opposition party presides over garrison constituencies. That is why crime is so high.

COLUMNS

How did the big favourite Vaz lose?

Mark Wignall

David Armstrong
12/9/2010

Mr. Wignall your generous statements on Mr. Vaz could be described as sucking up. Contrasting both candidates like the way you did would seems like they are like night and day. Your comment that Mr. Vaz was the better man for the job did not square up with the 160 delegates who selected Mr. Franklyn and does not square up with me either. My observation of Mr. Vaz is that he is an arrogant man and he has at best average communication skills for the post he holds. I don’t know much about Mr. Franklins background but if he is not the better man for the job of JLP gen.sec. then Jas future is indeed dismal.

‘I want to see my children grow up — Says wanted

man ‘Dog Paw’

Wanted man Christopher ‘Dog Paw’ Linton says cops telling lies about him

Sunday, December 12, 2010

David Armstrong
12/12/2010

Mr. Linton should turn himself in to the police and not try to win public sympathy via the media. If he thinks the police is out to get him then he should arange to have an escort that includes a clergyman and a journalist. If he is innocent of the charges he is wanted for then he will get his day in court. The police knows that he is the leader of the Dog Paw gang and he did not get to be the most wanted man in JA because the police of trumped-up charges.

Police kill four men in alleged shootout

Sunday, December 12, 2010

David Armstrong
12/12/2010

Is the Jamaica for Justice group going to call this police brutality too? This org. does not understand that when you have criminals with guns they are not going to surender to the police peacefull an if they engage the police in a shootout like the six men in this news report did they are going to draw fire from the police. The four men killed are very young and this is very disturbing. The govt. and/or other org. needs to get a powerful and dramatic message to young men that crime does not pay

Big support for Dr Lowe

Prof ‘Winty’ Davidson urges encouragement for cancer research scientist

BY NADINE WILSON Observer staff reporter wilsonn@jamaicaobserver.com

Tuesday, December 14, 2010

David Armstrong
12/14/2010

Prof. Davidson’s response to the unfortunate reaction to Dr. Lowe’s research effort on a drug or neutraceutical to treat prostate cancer appealed to the scientific community to discuss issues among themselves before going public. This request is reasonable but Dr. Lowe’s research work should have been published in a related industry journal or medical journal. The information reported in the paper was premature and contributed to confusion. Yes when Jamaicans like Dr. Lowe achieve some success we should support them. That does not mean we should not be critical and raise concerns. We cannot get too emotional about claims of medical discovery when the disease that it will claim to treat is a serious one like prostate cancer.

WikiLeaks reports Cuba/Ja drug row

Wednesday, December 15, 2010

David Armstrong
12/15/2010

This is yet another example of corrupt th epolitical system. Here we have the government of Cuba making repeated attempts to engage the JA government on the issue of
its failure to curb the flow of illegal drugs into the US. How is Bruce and Portia going to respond to this? My guess is they are going to just ignore it like how they have been ignoring crime and corruption. It pains my heart to see that these two political leaders and their predecessors have allowed JA to sink so low.

Jamaica mum on Cuba drug report

Thursday, December 16, 2010

I am just sick and fed up with the govt. and the opposition for their poor leadership, lack of vision, nonchalant attitude regarding the serious problems affecting the country. I don’t believe they care about what is being said by people or even by other govt. So I believe what needs to be done is for people to start massive protest to get their attention. I am not optimistic that this will happen because Jamaicans are too passive when it comes to protesting against the govt. or politicians. And some are too blind in their allegiance to their party. At this point there are just too much allegations facing the govt. and no meaningful response to address these allegations.

J’can cops lauded for work in US drug bust

Friday, December 17, 2010

David Armstrong
12/17/2010

Commissioner Owen Ellington and the police should be commended for their excellent job in helping the US agents apprehending the drug traffickers. In a country where leaders are in short supply, the commish is a breath of fresh air. He is doing a great job leading his force under difficult set of circumstances – unprecedented gun violence, political corruption, and negative criticisms from groups like JA for Justice. I pray for for his continued strength and courage to fight the evils in JA.

EDITORIAL

For our future’s sake…

Friday, December 17, 2010

David Armstrong
12/17/2010

In a society where there is rampant corruption we find all kinds of problems. Jamaica is running amok with corruption that starts at the highest level (the government) and trickles down into all levels of the society. The consequence of this is pervasive crime, incompetence (as appears to be the case with NEPA), and indiscipline. The problems that we read about daily are not coincidences they are the result of failed political leadership that has being corrupted by garrison politics. When politicians use and associate with dons who control criminals and thugs in their community they basically sell their soul to the devil.

Generous NEPA – AG says $19.9m paid in annual incentives

BY PETRE WILLIAMS-RAYNOR Environment editor williamsp@jamaicaobserver.com

Friday, December 17, 2010

David Armstrong
12/17/2010

Another case of trickle down corruption in a country that is running amok with corruption. There is no oversight and administrative procedures to govern how business is done. This is what happens when you have corrupt political leadership left, right, and center. These problems will continue as long as Jamaicans remain passive and blind. It is time to demand changes from the government. The corruption, garrison constituencies, gun violence, and drug trafficking must come to an end. These problems must not be tolerated if we want JA to realize its full potential.

End of recession is near, says PM

Saturday, December 18, 2010

David Armstrong
12/18/2010

Here we go again. This time the PM is blaming nature for the recession not ending soon (“the recession should have ended during the last Qtr of 2010, but due to the damage done by Tropical Storm Nicole in September, there is a delay”). This statement sounds more like political campaigning. What is important for Jamaica is to show results of performance and leadership. The performance indicators that matters right now are those related to gun violence, political corruption, and the dismantling of garrison constituencies. . This is what Jamaicans want to hear the PM talk about and tell us what he is doing to end these problems.

David Armstrong
12/21/2010

This Dog Paw is the leader of one of the most notorious gang in Jamaica & acts like he is innocent. I am amazed is that a Jamaica Observer reporter knows how to get in touch with him but the police don’t seems to have a clue where he is hiding. I am also amazed at how young he is and to have led such a life of crime at his young age. I also wonder how many people have died & how many have been traumatized as a result of his life of crime? It is time for him to give himself up or prepare to die.

damion green
12/21/2010

@ david, how do know he is what they say he is, without prove how can you judge some body.
the police make an arbitrary accusation just like always.
i’m not saying he is innocent either but where is the evidence

David Armstrong
12/21/2010

@damion green are you a moron .. the man is known to be a leader of a notorious gang called Dog Paw hence his nickname. He has not denied this. Now you tell me is he an innocent man? Has he never caused harm to anyone? I did not say he personally commited any crime I asked in my comment how many people he may have been victims as a result of his crime.

EDITORIAL

More than a court from Mr Bicknell, et al

Tuesday, December 21, 2010

David Armstrong

12/21/2010

Kudos to Mr. Bicknell for building this facility to allow young people an opportunity to develop their athletic skills. This facility will help young men to occupy their time with something more positive rather than with crime. All the young gunmen who are committing heinous crime could have been a Usain Bolt, a boxing champion, a football or cricket superstar if they had not taken the wrong path to their life of crime.


Too comfortable for Christ?

HEART TO HEART

With Betty Ann Blaine

Tuesday, December 21, 2010

(not posted)

Ms. Blaine you are calling for the church to take a bold and courageous stand against the culture of corruption and mismanagement that is strangling the nation and taking us down a steady downward trajectory. In as much as you might believe that the church represents God they have no real power over a govt. The entity that has real power over the govt. is the people. As an aspiring political leader you should be calling for the people to take a bold and courageous stand against the govt. In a democratic society it is the people that elect the politicians to form a govt. This is where their power comes from. You Mentioned Dr. Martin Luther King, he recognized the power of the people and used it to change an evil system.

Cops determined to leash ‘Dog Paw’

Kimmo Matthews

Thursday, December 23, 2010

David Armstrong
12/23/2010

Why is it so hard to find wanted criminals? It’s not like JA is the size of Canada or the US where criminals can get lost easily. And even then the cops in those countries get their man. Dog Paw is from the August Town area and seems to operate and live in that area. This area is a small area so why is it so hard to find him? Maybe he is hiding under one of the rock in the Hope River bed. Could the difficulty of finding criminals in JA be due to poor intelligence gathering by the police?

EDITORIAL

Two sides of the WikiLeaks coin

Thursday, December 23, 2010

12/23/2010

If there is any good that the WikiLeaks can provide is that it will make corrupt political leaders think twice before engaging in their corrupt and immoral behaviour. WikILieaks could be the Big Brother that george Orwell wrote about. If governments conduct their business in a honest an upright way then they won’t have to fear any repercussion from WikiLeaks. WikiLeakes is doing what many high profile news media is afraid to do expose corruption in high places. Long live WikiLeaks.

PM’s wife caught in WikiLeaks release

Thursday, December 23, 2010

David Armstrong
12/23/2010

Dudusgate will always be an albatross around the neck of the Mr. Golding. This PM has not only disgraced and shamed his country by his actions in the Dudus matter he has also allowed this ubiquitous incident to taint his wife and members of his party. This is what happens when a leader goes down the slippery path of corruption and evil. Those close to him and loyal to him follow him blindly and in the process get damaged too.

Nelson explains why Cuba might have been upset with Ja

Friday, December 24, 2010

David Armstrong
12/24/2010

Is anyone else sick & tired of the explanation, the excuses, & the blame that the failures and problems of this govt? All Jamaicans (except the criminals & the thugs) would love to see this govt. find solutions to the problems & implement actions to prevent the problems they have caused. For example to put an end to MPs using dons to oversee their constituencies. Put measures in place to make it extremely difficult for gunmen to commit their crime. Restore the integrity of the political system.

EDITORIAL

It’s time now to move forward with the CCJ

Friday, December 24, 2010

David Armstrong
12/24/2010

You cannot move forward with any plan unless there are good reasons to do so. Has the PM provided these reasons for wanting to replace the UK-based Privy Council with the proposed Caribbean Court of Justice (CCJ)? I would love to hear him give one reason as being the reactivation of the death penalty. When was the last time a convicted murder was executed? How many condemned prisoners are on death row? These are the kinds of justification that should be used for making the switch.

EDITORIAL

We’re losing our post-colonial leaders

Sunday, December 26, 2010

David Armstrong
12/26/2010

The political leadership issue is a serious problem and one that I believe is responsible for the major problem of gun crime and political corruption. These problems did not emerge overnight they evolved from through the governance of several political leaders. My list of best and worst post colonial political leaders in terms of whether they did or did not contribute to social problems existing today are: BEST: Bustamante (JLP), N.W. Manley (PNP), & M. Manley (PNP). This list is also based on them being strong leaders. WORST: Seaga (JLP), Patterson (PNP),

Portia (PNP), & Golding (JLP). This list is based on weak leadership and their involvement in garrison constituencies.

COLUMNS

Jamaica is still here

Jean Lowrie-Chin

David Armstrong
12/27/2010

If there is a perception that people are ignoring hard-won achievements of those who have been toiling long & hard to deliver these results it is because people are more preoccupied with the overwhelming conditions of social problems affecting the country. There are a few silver linings to the dark clouds of doom and despair but Ja’cans want to see more silver linings replacing the dark clouds of corruption, gun crimes, & indiscipline.

Close call! – Explosive device ignites before J’ca-bound flight

BY INGRID BROWN Senior staff reporter browni@jamaicaobserver.com

Wednesday, December 29, 2010

David Armstrong
12/29/2010

With all the increased security they now have at airports how is it that this hazardous material escaped detection and was allowed to be transported on an aircraft? My guess is that this man is a white man and that the screening process at airports still has some profiling or subjectivity to it. Had this man been of Arab descent every nook and cranny of his luggage would have been searched and if a hazardous material like this primer was found we would have known everything about him.

EDITORIAL

UTech: The challenge Mr Seaga will face

Wednesday, December 29, 2010

David Armstrong
12/29/2010

Personally I don’t think Mr. Seaga was the right choice to be Chancellor of UTech. I say this not because he lacks the acadamec credentials for such a position but because of his political background that had a lot of negative highlights. Mr. Seaga’s political policies have contributed to the corruption of the political system via the garrison constituencies. Mr. Seaga’s constituency was TG the home base of Dudus & his father Jim Brown. TG as we know is the most notorious garrison constituency

mark ranger
12/29/2010

Every damn thing is been politicized by Chuck Emmanuel, David Armstrong, Andy Wilson etc etc, these ppl are on

every blog, and they have nothing good to say about anything, but say they love Jamaica, wi kinda tired a unno negativity now, gi di blog dem some positivity 4di twenty eleven PLEEEEEEEZEE & thanks.

Mixed Christmas, uncertain new year

Mark Wignall

Thursday, December 30, 2010

David Armstrong
12/30/2010

From a political perspective 2010 was an incredulous year and bizarre year for JA because of one notorious event – Dudusgate. This event was a watershed moment for JA because it validated the corrupt, political system and exposed the lack of integrity of politicians (including the PM). Dudusgate also exposed the lack of effective leadership which you made reference to near the end of your column. Yes people will have to look to themselves and their fellowmen in the New Year for new directions.

Affidavit: J’ca-bound passenger had more than 700 bullet parts

BY INGRID BROWN Senior staff reporter browni@jamaicaobserver.com

Thursday, December 30, 2010

The questions in my mind are these: for what purpose was this idiot taking these ammunition primers to JA? and who was he going to deliver it to? We might not get any answers to these questions and so I am wondering if the authority didn’t blow this case by not allowing him to go JA then working with JA law enforcement put him under surveillance to see who his connections are.

Ellington not satisfied with small decline in murders

Confirms major shake-up at JCF

Kimmo Matthews

Thursday, December 30, 2010

Commissioner Ellington is one of a handful of public servants who is demonstrating good leadership. At least he seems to be saying the right things that you would expect from someone in his position. My only hope is that he will not allow the corrupt politicians to influence and intimidate him in performing his

duties. By the way what has happened to the James Robertson investigation? Seem like this investigation has stalled.