JAMAICA OBSERVER TALK BACK POSTS (June to July 2002)

JAMAICA OBSERVER TALK BACK POSTS (June to July 2002).

These posts were made using the pseudonym Progress4Jamaica

Posted by:

Progress4Jamaica

Posted on:

Tuesday, June 11, 2002 at 11:38:53 AM 

Location:

NY, USA 

Occupation:

None 

Comments:

This wreckless disregard and disrespect for the law and the men and women who enforces it must stop. Jamaica cannot and will not make progress if the lives of our police officers are snuffed out by criminals.

What will it take for Jamaicans to realize that they have to stand together to condemn and fight them in every nook and cranny of the country. That we will turn over every rock from which these slimy creatures hide and deal with them.

We have to stand together and fight crime. We need our political leaders to be united in this effort. We need Mr. Seaga to stand up and condemn crime and the criminals such as the one who murdered Inspector Gardner. We need the Prime Minister to make to address the country on the issue of these barbaric crime.

It is time we stop undermining the police by shouting police brutality when a crimianl is killed by the police. We ahve to understand that criminals who chose a life of crime and to confront the police will be killed. Our politicians must stop glorifying the dons and undermining the police. The police is up against barbarians who are well armed, who knows that the police have been made unpopular by certain elements in our society. It is time for us to support the police. Sure there are problems within the force but we shouldn’t use this as an excuse to render them useless in fighting crime and getting the respect and support from people.

Talk Back comments on ‘Cop shot dead in cambio’

Posted by:

Progress4Jamaica

Posted on:

Tuesday, June 11, 2002 at 5:59:52 PM 

Location:

NY, USA 

Occupation:

None 

Comments:

Mr. Patterson and Mr. Seaga what will it take for both of you to realize that killing of police officers is a serious crisis. Hundreds of Jamaicans have being murdered by criminals and yet no effective measures have being implemented to stop this madness. Now the very people we rely on to provide safety and protection from these criminals are not safe themeslves.

Mr. Patterson and Mr. Seaga as the political leaders of the country you both have an obligation to stop this madness. Your failure to implement measures to do this is unconscionable. It is time you stand together and find solutions to solve this problem. It is time to uimplement strong measures. There are too many guns in the wrong hands. It is time to disarm everyone except business people, law enforcement people and other security personnel.

This is not the time to argue and to condemn the police for previous mistakes. This is not the time to undermine the police. I fully expect to hear Mr. Patterson and Mr. Seaga make a public statement to condemn and to propose measures to deal with this horrible situation. I expect this more from Mr. seaga since in the past he has been an adversary of the police. Mr. Seaga this is your opportunioty do do something for the country. Stand up now and condemn all crime and pledge your support for the police. If you cannot do this you are not fit to be elected as PM.

Talk Back comments on ‘Amnesty raps West Kingston Inquiry’

Posted by:

Progress4Jamaica

Posted on:

Wednesday, May 29, 2002 at 11:19:40 AM 

Location:

NY, USA 

Occupation:

None 

Comments:

If many of the Posters don’t understand the simplistic tribal politics in Jamaica and how it affect their lives, I don’t see why they would understand politics on a regional or international scale. There are several international agencies that have their own political agenda and indeed promote the policies of the countries like the US. Never mind that they occasionally critize the US, they have to put up a smoke screen to expose the obvious.

Talk Back comments on ‘Is it culture or not?’

Posted by:

Progress4Jamaica

Posted on:

Saturday, June 29, 2002 at 8:08:48 AM 

Location:

NY, USA 

Occupation:

None 

Comments:

I think I have an idea of what Mr. Witter is trying to say but some how his article is very nebulous. Take for example his statement

“they have refused to reflect on the background of our early engagements as a developing country emerging from slavery. Again, they do not want to be reminded about the origin of race and what mistakes had shattered our existence for fear their forebears might be blamed for our present predicament”

His reference here to slavery and race does not convey the full thought of what I think he is alluding to. Perhaps some more elaboration would have clarified what he really means.

Mr. Witter is right though to recognize that slavery and race are issues that we are still grappling with. Slavery it seems has permanently damaged our psyche. This damage manifests itself in our cultural behaviour today. We do not trust each other, we have no unifying force that makes us consolidate our endeavours, and our ability to create and organize effectively are just of the few things that slavery has deprieved us of.

I have said this before and I know it’s not a popular thing to say but i’ll say it again. When you look at the black population around the world today what you see is chaos, destruction, poverty and garbage. The one thing that all these black population have in common is that they have experienced slavery and colonialism. This is where the root of our problem originates from.

Another psychological damage from slavery and colonialism is that it has left us feeling so inferior to the white man. The slavery experience has undoubetedly made the black race totally dependent on the white man today. That is why so many of us have this love- hate relationship with the white man.

Until the black people can find a unifying force to help us transcend the slavery and colonialism experience, our damaged psyche will never heal. We can find this force through a religious experience (just like how the Jews have done it with Zionism) or by philosophical/ideological means. I don’t know if this will ever happen because in this materialistic world we have become very distracted and obsessed with materials thing.

Talk Back comments on ‘Cop shot dead on East Street ‘

Posted by:

Progress4Jamaica

Posted on:

Tuesday, June 18, 2002 at 6:20:45 AM 

Location:

NY, USA 

Occupation:

None 

Comments:

Again how many more police officers and citizens must be murdered by the criminal parasites before the government and all law abiding Jamaicans say enough is enough. It is full time for the government to take drastic actions to stop this madness. Jamaicans have ben misguided to see the policer as their enemies and untrustworthy. To some degree poor leadership withing that agency has contributed to this loss of respect for the police.

Despite the inherent problems with the constabulary force, Jamaicans cannot continue to treat the police as if they are the enemy. If we do that then who will protect us from the criminals?

The murder of any human being is reprehensible, but when we see this escalating pattern of police officers being killed in cold blood this is a serious problem that threatens the security and safety of the general problem.

Last week after the murder of the Inspector in St. James, I suggested that teh government disarm all Jamaicans, except for those who have a ligitimate use to possess a firearm. We have to satrt a campaign like this. The government cannot just simple sit back and do nothing.

I am still waiting for the Leadfer of the Opposition to make a public statement to condemn these murders and to pledge his whole hearted suport for the police. He recently signed the code of conduct with teh PM and that is commendable but much more is needed than that. I have repeatedly singled out Mr. Seaga on issues related to the police because he has consistently undermine them. When we have a major political figure like Mr. Seaga doing this then this sends the wromg message to criminals. We cannot allow our political leaders to do this. It si not good for the country.

Talk Back comments on ‘Cop shot dead on East Street ‘

Posted by:

Progress4Jamaica

Posted on:

Tuesday, June 18, 2002 at 11:35:33 AM 

Location:

NY, USA 

Occupation:

None 

Comments:

The following two factors have contributed to the madness that’s going on now in Jamaica:

1) The Jamaican public is too passive. When citizens become too passive in a society then predators or parasites move in and do as they please.

2) Our political leaders preside over a political system that has been contaminated by criminal influences and corruption. Consequently, they cannot stand up declare war on the criminals because they fear the backlash from the criminals (dons)they have coddled over the years.

The failure of the two political leaders (Mr. Patterson and Mr. Seaga) to respond to the criss of police officers being killed is perplexing to say the least. Is it fear or waht that renders them so helpless in dealing with this matter. And if they cannot implement measures to stop these barbaric murders then who will do it? Mr. Patterson and Mr. Seaga as the official political leaders of the country has the political and moral responsibility to do something. We are talking about the PM who governs Jamaica wants to be re-elected as PM and the Leader of the Opposition who wants to be elected as the next PM. Yet tehy continue to show that they are spineless and not worthy to lead anything.

Each time a citizen or a police is killed the hands of the PM and the leader of teh Opposition becomes stained with blood. These men should be ashamed of themselves for callimg themselves political leaders.

Talk Back comments on ‘More power for police complaints body’ 

Posted by:

Progress4Jamaica

Posted on:

Wednesday, June 19, 2002 at 6:08:41 AM 

Location:

NY, USA 

Occupation:

None 

Comments:

Mr. Phillips for God’s sake more drastic action is required to deal with the serious crisis of police being brutually murdered. The priority now is to find methods to deal with the criminals who youclaim are targetting teh police. One drastic method to do this is to disarm everyone except those who need to have a firearm.

I know a lot of people will protest and plan to implement disarming the nation. But that’s fine, the good will have to suffer with the bad this time. We have a serious problem here and it threatens to plunge the country into anarchy and cause the collapse of of an already fragile economy.

Mr. Phillips, please tell your boss he needs to wake up from his slumber or get some steel braces for his backbone. And I am still waiting for Mr. Seaga to make some statement to condemn the killing of police men. This man seems to only get animated when police move into Tivolli Gardens. No wonder the country is going to hell. We have a bunch of politicians who have no vision, no leadership, no creativity, and certainly no compassion for their fellow Jamaicans.

Talk Back comments on ‘More power for police complaints body’ 

Posted by:

Progress4Jamaica

Posted on:

Wednesday, June 19, 2002 at 11:47:06 AM 

Location:

NY, USA 

Occupation:

None 

Comments:

When I post comments on this forum i’m trying to

send a message to the politicians (hopefully they do get some kind of feed back from their Press Secretary on comments posted on this forum). Jamaica today is in serious trouble and needs drastic measures to restore the country to some semblance of decency, civility, and order. For this to happen Jamaicans have to get oot of this passive mode and demand that the political leaders find solutions to the problems.

One of the big problem we have today is that as a people we have become too reactive instead of creative. You see examples of this type of behaviour on this forum all the time. Our politicians must stop being reactive and become more creative in finding solutions to problems.

Again, we need to disarm the population at large and go back to something like the Gun Court. We cannot afford a do nothing policy at this stage. Find ways to get the guns out of the hands of criminals.

Talk Back comments on ‘Cops not a target, says security minister’

Posted by:

Progress4Jamaica

Posted on:

Thursday, June 20, 2002 at 6:03:06 AM 

Location:

NY, USA 

Occupation:

None 

Comments:

Re Crime & Jamaica: Real Solutions for a Very Real Problem
by Andrew McIntosh.

Very good essay Mr. McIntosh. You did mention training as a prerequisite for the police. I would elaborate on that to the extent that we not only need to train our police officers we probably need to raise the qualification level from now. I believe that part of the problem why the police has been ineffective in dealing with the public is due to their qualification. Our police should probably have a basic education of criminal justice at the college level.

The benefit from having police officers with a background in criminal justice at the college level would be enormous. At the least it would enable them to deal with the public in a more professional manner. Obviously having police officers with a college level qualification means more pay..but I think the pay back would justify this.

Talk Back comments on ‘Outpouring of love for Hugh Crosskill’

Posted by:

Progress4Jamaica

Posted on:

Friday, June 21, 2002 at 2:49:56 AM 

Location:

NY, USA 

Occupation:

None 

Comments:

WORLD CUP SOCCER NEWS…England vs Brazil 1-1 at half time.
***********************************
Hugh Crosskill death is indeed tragic and just shows again and again that cocaine is a deadly drug that kills, ruin lives and wreak misery and those who use it.

I have heard nothing but great tributes for Hugh Croskill. The most common one being that he had a brilliant mind. Now I know that when someone dies we eugolized them with great tributes deservedly or undeservedly out of respect for the dead. However, I have been wondering how much of Mr. Crosskill’s brilliance might have been due to the influence of cocaine or ganga?

It is well known that the use of drugs can influence creativity and can cause a person to experience higher levels of consciousness. So the mind becomes a litle more stimulated and the person can think, say things, or do things that they normally can’t do without the use of the drug.

When I was a youngster, I remeember foing to the Carib Theatre to see some of the best musical performers like Jimmy Cliff and Bob Marley. Being shy I was always amazed at the things they could do on stage. They were very uninhibited and they appeared like Gods having full control over the audience. I wondered to myself if I could do some of the things they do on stage and felt very inadequate when I didn’t think I would be able to do it in front of a large audience. But soon after I realize it was the ganga they were using that caused them to behave that way. I felt cheated and from that time I never idolized a musician whom I suspect might be a drug user.
***********************************
OK i‘m back to soccer. Unbelievable..Brazil just score from a Ronaldhino free kick way outsider the box…2-1. Brazil the soccer King of the world.

Talk Back comments on ‘Outpouring of love for Hugh Crosskill’

Posted by:

Progress4Jamaica

Posted on:

Friday, June 21, 2002 at 7:15:39 AM 

Location:

NY, USA 

Occupation:

None 

Comments:

Angella, I may not have a brilliant mind like Hugh Croskill. But i’m smart enough to know the consequences of using drugs. I also have certain spiritual values that tells me that I should treat my body as sacred temple. When you have this type of knowledge then you treatr your body with respect and you avoid anything that will do harm to the body, mind, and soul.

Most of us realize that if Hugh Croskill was just a “nobody” we would not hear much about this tragic event. Even when the well to do get caught up in these terrible things that apparently should only happen to the lower class people, society tends to gloss over it and make excuses for them.

I‘m sorry but if Mr. Crosskill had such a brilliant mind he should have been smart enough to know that if he tried Cocaine, he would become addicted to it. He should have known that once he become addicted to it the consequences would be as fate proved deadly. What’s the point of having a brilliant mind and knot using it wisely.

May his soul rest in peace.

Talk Back comments on ‘Outpouring of love for Hugh Crosskill

Posted by:

Posted on:

Friday, June 21, 2002 at 7:37:28 AM 

Location:

peekskill, new york 

Occupation:

 

Comments:

You are wrong Progress4Ja, you are brilliant! Like I said, you are smart enough to choose to not use drugs. You are also right about had the situation been in the reverse, with a ‘no-name’ person, this would not take on any significance.

I didn’t hear any mention of Mr Crosskill, Sr, he didn’t have anything to say???


By the way, Progress4Ja, u nat cheering on the US?

‘Oneness’

Talk Back comments on ‘Outpouring of love for Hugh Crosskill’

Posted by:

Progress4Jamaica

Posted on:

Friday, June 21, 2002 at 8:51:15 AM 

Location:

NY, USA 

Occupation:

None 

Comments:

Angella, the US don’t need me to cheer for them, they have enough people in this country that should be cheering for them. People in the US needs to realize that soccer is truly an international game …not baseball, not basketball, and not football. While these games are interesting they certainly don’t compare to soccer in every aspect we can think of.

I am also disappointed in how I see soccer being promoted in the US. It seems to me like it’s being promoted as an elitist game rather than as a game for the masses. That is why people in the US have no interest in it. To promote anything in a society it must first be promoted at the grass root level. I could get on my soap box about sport in the US, but this is all i’ll say here about this matter.

The US soccer team has done well though to get to the quarter final round. I‘m sure this will serve as a catalyst to get more interest in the game here.

Talk Back comments on ‘Gov’t goes after drug assets’

Posted by:

Progress4Jamaica

Posted on:

Friday, June 21, 2002 at 3:00:26 AM 

Location:

NY, USA 

Occupation:

None 

Comments:

Am I missing something here..the Jamaican government turns over more than half the money from the acount of A Canadian citizen with a Jamaican bank account allegedly funded with drug money. Why didn’t the government keep all the money? The account was in a Jamaican bank…is there some law that says this must be done and who determined how much must be shared with Canada? This doesn’t make sense to me..

Talk Back comments on ‘Nurses heading north for better-paying jobs ‘

Posted by:

Progress4Jamaica

Posted on:

Sunday, June 23, 2002 at 7:51:28 AM 

Location:

NY, USA 

Occupation:

None 

Comments:

Everything possible should be done to prevent the brain drain from Jamaica. Jamaica cannot move forward when nurses, teachers and other professionals leave the country for grener pastures. People who perform essential servicers should be compensated, and treated with respect so that they do not have any desire to migrate to another country.

When all our professional people leave Jamaica then only the criminals and illiterate people will be left behind. The government apparently cannot corral these criminals and so one wonders what will become of this beautiful island.

Professionals like myself who have a yearning to

return to Jamaica find it extremely difficult to do this. The present culture is rife with corruption, lawlessnesss, and indiscipline. Some could argue that these problems are universal today. While that may be true, the degree to which these problems exist in a small country is unacceptable for me. On top of these problems we have politicians who are arrogant. These politicians think they own the island and the people. They have no respect for civil decency, the institutions that supose to maintain law and order, and the they continuously exploit the ignorance of the people.

As I have said many times before, Jamaicans have no one to blame but themselves for the problems that exist in Jamaica today. We Jamaicans are good at fighting and arguing amongst ourselves but when it comes to organizing ourselves and developing startegies to demand better from our political leaders we fail miserably. Instead as we see on this forum we idolize our political leaders too much and for doing nothing.

Jamaicans cannot afford to be provincial in their thinking when it comes to politics. We have to start thinking in terms of what is good for the country and not think about the personalities of the political leaders. We have to force our politicians to address the issues that demand attention and not just react to them. We have to know what the agenda and strategy of the political leaders are and how they well benefit the country. Give your allegiance to your country not to the politicians becasue they are just the instruments that we must use to make Jamaica a better place. ASK NOT WHAT THE JLP OR THE PNP CAN DO FOR YOU ASK WHAT THEY AND YOU CAN DO FOR THE COUNTRY.

Talk Back comments on ‘Police Federation demands resumption of hanging’

Posted by:

Progress4Jamaica

Posted on:

Monday, June 24, 2002 at 11:17:52 AM 

Location:

NY, USA 

Occupation:

None 

Comments:

Lethal injection is a better alternative to hanging. For one thing it’s more “humane” than hanging even though I believe that some of the scum bags who brutally kill other people deserve to be killed brutually also. Drastic measures are needed to deal with the criminal scum bags who have no fear of killing anyone that crosses their path.

It’s full time we let the criminals know that we return the favor to the criminals by putting fear into them. If anyone think hardened criminals don’t fear the death penality then you are wrong. I have seen on TV death row inmates in the US wimper and show fear as their date with the executioner gets close.

Another way we could deal with the scum bag murders is to line them up in front of a firing squad. I‘m sure we have soldiers who would like to get some experience in what they have ben trained to do…go to war and kill the enemy. need to get some training

Talk Back comments on ‘Crusade for Garvey’s philosophy ‘

Posted by:

Progress4Jamaica

Posted on:

Monday, June 24, 2002 at 11:38:25 AM 

Location:

NY, USA 

Occupation:

None 

Comments:

I have great respect for Marcus Garvey because he was of integrity, character, and pride. Marcus Garvey was a great advocate of self reliance for the black race and he embarked on many ventures to help promote this self reliance.

Perhaps the one mistake that Marcus Garvey made that he set out to achieve his goals in the US. Even though he did make a significant impact, his work soon got the attention of the white power structure. They feared that he would mobilize the black peopel

not only in the US but in Africa and the carribean. So eventually they persecuted him and got him arresetd on mail fraud.

Anhow, Marcus Garvey should be given the full recognition just like how Americans give Thomas Jefferson and the founding fathers high recognition. I know I have deep respect for Marcus Garve and feel I have a special connection to him through his brilliant son Marcus Garvey Jr. who taught me Physics, Maths, and Engineering Science in high school.

Talk Back comments on ‘Death threat’

Posted by:

Progress4Jamaica

Posted on:

Tuesday, June 25, 2002 at 11:29:42 AM 

Location:

NY, USA 

Occupation:

None 

Comments:

This is indeed very unfortunate that Ms. Sinclair received death threat because she complained about a situation that she was right to complain about in the first place. It is also unfortunate that she yielded to these threats because this will now send a terrible message to unrerasonable people that if someone complain too much just threaten them and they will shut up. I understand why that when you receive a death threat you cannot take it lightly and it is frighteniong enough to let you take actions like Ms. Sinclair has taken.

Two things need to happen here with regards to Ms. Sinclair death threat and the landslide problem from the construction of new homes.:

First the police needs to vigourously investigate the death threat and find the individual(s) behind it. The second thing is that the government needs to suspend this project and investigate the complaints from teh residents of Wellington Glades. Obviously the construction work lacked the proper enginering reinforcement to ensure that a landslide would not occur.

I‘m not sure the government will take any action though to suspend this project since they are a partner too. The government and the ownere should realize that they are fully liable for any damages to property or fatalities that could result from thsi project.

To the peopel behind the death threat to Ms. Sinclair, you should know that killing someone for material gain will not profit you anything. You have a bigger death sentence on your head as you have already lost your soul. What does it profit a man if he gains the whole world and lose his so

Talk Back comments on ‘Wellington Glades and democracy’

Posted by:

Progress4Jamaica

Posted on:

Wednesday, June 26, 2002 at 6:23:46 AM 

Location:

NY, USA 

Occupation:

None 

Comments:

Unless the people of Jamaica wake up from their passivity and indifference the pernicious evil that is ripping the social fabric of the country into shreds will continue until there is nothing left. All decent and law abiding Jamaicans (gosh one gets the impression they are outnumbered by the criminals) must wake up and start fighting this evil. We must use every resources, energy, and strategy to defeat this enemy that threatens to destroy our existence.

Obviously our political leaders have lost the will to govern and lead the country. They lost this will when they became partners with dons and embarked on the politics of corruption. Our political leaders are drunk with the wine of corruption and therefore are unable to steer the ship out of perilous waters. Jamaicans must rise up and detox our politicians so that they can regaing their skills to steer the ship to peace and tranquility.

No one in their right mind would let a drunken driver drive them to any destination. Why do we let our drunken political leaders drive us to a destination that has nothing but crime and evil along the way. We must get them sober again so that they can perform the job we elected them to do. We have to demand better and get the politicians out of their comfort zone. In short we have to put the heat on them.

Talk Back comments on ‘Barbados set to hang four Tuesday’

Posted by:

Progress4Jamaica

Posted on:

Friday, June 28, 2002 at 6:19:31 AM 

Location:

NY, USA 

Occupation:

None 

Comments:

My understanding is that Barbadoes is a less violent society than Jamaica. If this is true then it shouldn’t be a big surprise since they have a smaller population than Jamaica(although I hasten to say that crime and violence is not necessarily a function of population size). Given that thought, I am wondering how Barbadoes can manage to order the execution of murders and Jamaica cannot.

Considering the exponential increase of murders in Jamaica over the past ten years, Jamaica should have convicted murders lining up at the gallows. Instead we have none and consequently the murder rate continues to grow. Not only is it growing, but also we have murders of police officers happening too frequently.

It is full time Jamaica re-start the hanging of convicted murders. People who commit the kind of murders that are commonly occurring in Jamaica should be executed rather than given life sentences. We simple cannot allow people to raise a gun and shoot someone like an animal.

Talk Back comments on ‘Tears unable to save drug mule from prison’

Posted by:

Progress4Jamaica

Posted on:

Friday, June 28, 2002 at 11:38:43 AM 

Location:

NY, USA 

Occupation:

None 

Comments:

Guns have destroyed the lives of many Jamaicans and now cocaine is doingthe same thing. Day after day we read about the tragedies that have resulted from the use of guns and cocaine. What is worse is that no measures are being put in place to stop the mayhem and destruction from guns and cocaine.

The government and Jamaicans cannot sit back and wait for problems to reach crisis levels. Foresight and quick action must be used to nip problems before they become a crisis. Jamaicans need to be more proactive and more vigilant if the society is to be restored to healthy status.

Jamaica today has more educated politicians than at any other time in it’s history. We have several members of the government and the opposition who have PhD’s or undergraduate degrees yet they kind find soluitions for the social problems that’s plaguing the country. This is very sad and scary.

Talk Back comments on ‘Is it culture or not?’

Posted by:

Progress4Jamaica

Posted on:

Saturday, June 29, 2002 at 8:08:48 AM 

Location:

NY, USA 

Occupation:

None 

Comments:

I think I have an idea of what Mr. Witter is trying to say but some how his article is very nebulous. Take for example his statement

“they have refused to reflect on the background of our early engagements as a developing country emerging from slavery. Again, they do not want to be reminded about the origin of race and what mistakes had shattered our existence for fear their forebears might be blamed for our present predicament”

His reference here to slavery and race does not convey the full thought of what I think he is alluding to. Perhaps some more elaboration would have clarified what he really means.

Mr. Witter is right though to recognize that slavery and race are issues that we are still grappling with. Slavery it seems has permanently damaged our psyche. This damage manifests itself in our cultural behaviour today. We do not trust each other, we have

no unifying force that makes us consolidate our endeavours, and our ability to create and organize effectively are just of the few things that slavery has deprieved us of.

I have said this before and I know it’s not a popular thing to say but i’ll say it again. When you look at the black population around the world today what you see is chaos, destruction, poverty and garbage. The one thing that all these black population have in common is that they have experienced slavery and colonialism. This is where the root of our problem originates from.

Another psychological damage from slavery and colonialism is that it has left us feeling so inferior to the white man. The slavery experience has undoubetedly made the black race totally dependent on the white man today. That is why so many of us have this love- hate relationship with the white man.

Until the black people can find a unifying force to help us transcend the slavery and colonialism experience, our damaged psyche will never heal. We can find this force through a religious experience (just like how the Jews have done it with Zionism) or by philosophical/ideological means. I don’t know if this will ever happen because in this materialistic world we have become very distracted and obsessed with materials thing.

Talk Back comments on ”Semen makes women feel good”

Posted by:

Progress4Jamaica

Posted on:

Sunday, June 30, 2002 at 10:22:46 AM 

Location:

NY, USA 

Occupation:

None 

Comments:

“Semen makes women feel good” this is exciting news for men. I just printed off a copy of this article for my wife to read. I am also going to find the NY times artice. Man I hope my wife agrees with the article. I am excited already.

Talk Back comments on ”Semen makes women feel good”

Posted by:

darth_vader

Posted on:

Sunday, June 30, 2002 at 2:21:55 PM 

Location:

new jersey, usa 

Occupation:

detective 

Comments:



Post #1 I would hope that for your sense of manhood when you tell your wife you are excited by the article rather than by her she will not lock you out of HER HOUSE.

That might really be a seminal experience which might cause you to stand up straight and show her how tough is your manhood after all.

As the writer says it is all in testosterone … your either have lot of it; anything less doesn’t count… and just reading about it will not make any difference.

Be careful what you say to the missis.

Talk Back comments on ‘Cop shot dead in downtown violence’

Posted by:

Progress4Jamaica

Posted on:

Sunday, June 30, 2002 at 10:16:38 AM 

Location:

NY, USA 

Occupation:

None 

Comments:

I am appealing to the government to disarm the general public and implement laws to put people away. Get rid of the guns now and start the process of eliminating gun violence from society. For those who legally own guns the authorities could keep them fro a period of time until they control the gun violence.

Talk Back comments on ‘Seaga just ahead as leader with best grasp of problems’

Progress4Jamaica

Posted on:

Sunday, July 14, 2002 at 8:27:11 AM 

Location:

NY, USA 

Occupation:

None 

Comments:

Commentary, your views appear to be sincere and I respect them even though I don’t agree with some aspects of your views. Unfortunately, writing on this forum ad-lib does not help in allowing one to elaborate and provide more specific instead of generalized comments. I also, find that this medium is not conducive for debating (you can exchange written comments but I don’t care for that so much). I rather debate someone in person.

I do believe though that Mr. Patterson has more integrity and character than Mr. Seaga. When Mr. patterson is exposed for any flaws that count against his integrity or character, then I will correct my view point. Both men are like day and night (no pun intended in reference to color).

Talk Back comments on ‘West Kgn report for Parliament’

Posted by:

Progress4Jamaica

Posted on:

Monday, July 01, 2002 at 11:47:38 AM 

Location:

NY, USA 

Occupation:

None 

Comments:

I blame Justice Isaacs for letting Mr. Seaga subvert his inquiry. He should have been more heavy handed and charge Mr. Seaga for contempt. Mr. Seaga played a prominent role in the West Kingston violence. He was there in the heat of battle trying to

arrange safe passage for the police or depending on the police story preventing them from doing their job.

Mr. Seaga was subpoenaed to testify before the inquiry, he denounced its style, declared that his right to a fair hearing was being denied and then walked out. Can you imagine if someonels had attempted doing that what would have happened? That individual would no doubt be imprisoned or fined for contempt.

The Jamaican proverb “duppy know who fe frighten” applies to Mr. Seaga’s treatment of the inquiry. So now we wait for the findings of the inquiry that will problably tell half the story because one of the main character did not participate. This is very unfortunate and it will certainly tarnish Mr. Seaga’s reputation if it was not already tarnished.

With Justice Isaacs failing to implement his authority and proper controls, the inquiry has been reduced to nothing more than a circus spectacle. Mr. Seaga must also be blamed for this and for not setting a good example for Jamaicans. Shame on Justice Isaacs, shame on Mr. Seaga.

Talk Back comments on ‘Carter was ill-advised says archbishop’

Posted by:

Progress4Jamaica

Posted on:

Wednesday, July 03, 2002 at 6:54:01 AM 

Location:

NY, USA 

Occupation:

None 

Comments:

Commentary, your posts are generally balanced with reason and common sense. Reason and common senses is what is so badly lacking among many Jamaicans at home, abroad, and on this forum. You are one of the select few Posters that do not get innvolved with meaningless, immature, and egotistical posts.

I do not generally provide feedback on posters

comments – bad or good, but I will make an exception for you as you have demonstrated time and time again that you are a Jamaican who like myself is deeply concerned about the problems in Jamica and do not see these problems being resolved by partisian politics.

I don’t have all the facts on the Thewaites problems so I am not going to speculate and make generalizations about this matter. The fact of the matter is that corruption is not new to Jamaican politics. Corruption is pervasive throughout the political spectrum of Jamaican politics and that is probably part of the reason why our politicians are so ineffective in getting anything done properly.

I wish more Jamaicans would wake up and become more broad minded when it comes to solving the problems that are crippling the country. We have to realize that when controversy like the Thwaites scandal breaks out, the focus shouldn’t be on whether it’s a PNP or JLP politician. If one party was good and the other evil then yes we could make political distinctions. But this is not the case.

Talk Back comments on ‘Carter was ill-advised says archbishop’

Posted by:

Progress4Jamaica

Posted on:

Wednesday, July 03, 2002 at 12:51:39 PM 

Location:

NY, USA 

Occupation:

None 

Comments:

Some Posters have suggested that congratulations are in order for Mark Wignall. OK, maybe yes, but I think journalist should have a journalistic and moralistic responsibility to expose corrupt public officials and politicians. Still I will extend my congratulations to Mr. Wignall and hope he that he continues to fearlesly report the news in a honest and objective manner. I also hope that more journalist will take his lead and remind politicians that the pen is mightier than the sword.


I also want to comment an an idea that that two Posters (Pato., Post #60 and neNewsboyPILOT, post #61) made. The idea is that Jamaica should have a system of government where the brightest are selected to govern the country. For quite sometime now I have reasoned with myself that the two party system hinders progress and does not promote unity. I beleieve that many countries would benefit from some kind of consortium government that operates under a democratic process.

This consortium government would eliminate political parties that have have caused so much divisions especially in Third World countries like Jamaica. Just look at the Opposition party how it operates in Jamaica, it basically makes no contribution towards national development and unity (this applies to any opposition party be it PNP or JLP).

The two party system seems to work reasonably well in developed countries where the electorate is politically savy. In Third World countires that have high illiteracy rates and where the people are not politically astute, the two part system does not work and in fact exploits the ignorance of people more than anything else.

Maybe a consortium type of government in Jamaica will unite people, focus its energy on the development of the country, (the two part system reacts to each other wasting time on issues that do not benefit the country. Maybe this is the kind of government that is more suitable to black people who desperately needs more than any other race to be united.

It is time for political reform in Jamaica, it is time to look at new approaches to governing people who are generally too fractious.

Talk Back comments on ‘High-level crime meetings’

Posted by:

Progress4Jamaica

Posted on:

Thursday, July 04, 2002 at 6:44:45 AM 

Location:

NY, USA 

Occupation:

None 

Comments:

There is something very suspicious going on here when police officers are beign killed in cold blood. What makes these killings very suspicious is that professional criminals seldomly kill police officers because they know it is not good for their criminal operations. The mMafia bosses who arer the ultimate crime professionals knew this and ordered their underlings not to harm police officers. So why are Jamaican police officers being murdered in cold blood?

I do not like to speculate especially when I don’t have enough facts but i’m blessed with a little ESP (we all have ESP anyhow, it’s just that some of us use it more than others and as the saying goes use it or lose it). Anyhow last night it my ESP became energized and here is what I found out:

If someone implement a plan to kill police officers it will throw the government in a quandary. The government is caught bewteen a rock and a hard place. This is election year, they have to be careful, they can implement drastic actions or band-aid solutions but either way they run the risk of of not effectively dealing with the problem or implementing unpopular measures.

So why are police officers being targeted (and yes that is pretty obvious by now)? Well you can’t use the same old West kingfston style political violence at this stage (at least not now maybe later). That method has been put under the miscroscope by the Commission of Inquiry. The police are very vulnerable becasue of their unpopularity, and constant undermining of thier efforts – yes you guessed that right).

The Brayton killings is part of the reason why the police have become so unpopular. Afterall that incident attracted the attention of Amnesty International. If this incident got their attention who knows what other outside attention it got. I could speculate here on this but I won’t. I will say though that there are vested interest in ensuring that Mr. Seaga wins the next election. And this vested interest will help him by any means necessary. Anyone familiar with the Carribean Basin Initiative. If you are not, do some research on the internet and you will find some interesting information.

Talk Back comments on ‘High-level crime meetings’

Posted by:

Progress4Jamaica

Posted on:

Thursday, July 04, 2002 at 9:50:04 AM 

Location:

NY, USA 

Occupation:

None 

Comments:

Cosford (Post #10) you are very perceptive. You know exactly what’s going on in Jamaica. It doesn’t need a rocket scientist to figure out what has led to the crime wave and cold blooded murder of police officers. Most Jamaicans are too blind from unjustified political alegiance to see what the problem really is.

When problem occur in a society, there is always some contributing factors that lead to these problems. I have been saying it for a long time now, that Mr. Seaga’s behaviour and attitude has indirectly led to the the political violence and setting up the police officers to become targets of cold blooded killers. I have repeatedly called for Mr. Seaga to denounce and condemn thes cold blooded murders of 5 cops and to date he is unable to do so.

Now i‘m not a PNP (in fact I think PJ should not bother to seek another term as PM) or a JLP person. I‘m for Jamaica and all i want to see is a good political leader who can serve the country well. Any fool want to think that teh PNP is behind all this crime wave, better take their head out of the sand before it’s too late. The government does not benefit from crime. In fact it loses it’s credibility when it fails to deal with crime effectively. Once we understand this, it’s not hard to put two and two together and understand what’s going on.

Talk Back comments on ‘Politicians fuss over police’

Posted by:

Progress4Jamaica

Posted on:

Friday, July 05, 2002 at 9:04:49 AM 

Location:

NY, USA 

Occupation:

None 

Comments:

Below is an excerpt from the article:

Music as a Medium of Discontent:
a comparative approach to blues, jazz, reggae, and hip-hop
Bari Lehrman
April 18, 1998
http://debate.uvm.edu/dreadlibrary/lehrman.html


“Like the black people in the United States, those in Jamaica are faced with the same feelings of alienation that can be traced back to deportation and slavery. They are subjugated because of their color and culture, and even the emancipation of Jamaica from the British did not change the relationship between the races. On the contrary, it has encouraged the oppressed to internalize the feelings of subordination and worthlessness, and to accept the superiority of their oppressors (Constant 41). Unfortunately, for the majority of the population, this has led to incredible poverty and hardship, with little hope for a way out.
Like many post-independence governments, the government of Jamaica felt the need to use force to repress threats of any kind. This can be seen in the incredible amount of violence that plagues the streets of that small island. Politicians felt it necessary to draw support and safety from gunmen, who were in turn protected from the law by the politicians. With the elections in the 1970’s, and the competition between Michael Manley (People’s National Party) and Edward Seaga (Jamaican Labor Party), the violence increased. The United States embraced Seaga and the JLP, and in an attempt to prevent another chance at democratic socialism, the CIA supplied weapons to guarantee Seaga’s success (Gunst xvii-xiv). There was an incredible increase in violence and murder, and Kingston became sectioned off along party lines (Gunst 10). The country was very economically depressed, and there were many riots and a complete lack of food and resources to the poor (Gunst 115). In turn, there became a noticeable separation of the poverty-stricken”sufferers”into the dangerous ghetto.
In the 1970’s and 1980’s, crime and unemployment increased greatly, and the police began using deadly force against suspected criminals. It was not long before they were directing their own frustrations and aggression on the ‘criminal element’, and it went far beyond the government’s control (Chevigny 25). While in ordinary circumstances, the police represent social order, in Jamaica they represent an”order of violence, filled with personal vengeance, and socially stratified”(Chevigny 30). The most dramatic problem was the rise in firearm use and deadly force on the streets. It was estimated that between 1983 and 1993, the police killed about 182 person each year, reflecting an often disproportionate use of deliberate deadly force (Chevigny 26).
It has been well-known on the island that those who defy the police are in danger of death. The collaboration of the police and the army (“security forces”)often leads to unjustified shootings. Also, because the court system works so slow, the police often get impatient and”dispose”of suspects themselves in”bogus shootouts”(Chevigny 27). There is no effective discipline for these actions, and the corruption is extremely high. In these dangerous and unstable conditions, the people are led to feel powerless and dependent. They have not developed a well-defined sense of rights, and are therefore victims of extreme poverty, violence, and oppression (Chevigny 130).”

Talk Back comments on ‘Politicians fuss over police’

Posted by:

Progress4Jamaica

Posted on:

Friday, July 05, 2002 at 9:14:47 AM 

Location:

NY, USA 

Occupation:

None 

Comments:

If you have read the information provided in my last two posts and still have doubt where all this political violence and gun crime originates from then you better wake up. We have evil people in our midst who will sell their soul to the devil (well I think they have done this already) to gain the whole world. But as the good book says “WHAT DOES IT PROFIT A MAN TO GAIN THE WHOLE WORLD AND LOSE HIS SOUL”

Talk Back comments on ‘Phillips tells Paul Burke no’

Posted by:

Progress4Jamaica

Posted on:

Saturday, July 06, 2002 at 8:31:44 AM 

Location:

NY, USA 

Occupation:

None 

Comments:

This unprecedented crime wave that includes the killing of police officers has now caused a crack in the government’s armour. The government cannot fight crime with a defective armour or if there is no solidarity in thier ranks.

Mr. Phillips is right though, “the entire Jamaica is a single state and that the security forces have a responsibility for every square inch of Jamaican territory.”

Having said tha Mr. Phillips, your next move should be to order a combined military police operation into places like Tivolli Gardens and clean up the place once and for all. And for God’s sake you don’t have to get permission from Mr. Seaga to go into Tivolli Garden. Mr. Seaga is is just acting like a military general over a criminal quasi-military community. If he truies to prevent the police from doing it’s job, I say slap the cuffs on him. He is not above the law.

Talk Back comments on ‘A few tips for the police’

Posted by:

Progress4Jamaica

Posted on:

Monday, July 08, 2002 at 6:17:22 AM 

Location:

NY, USA 

Occupation:

None 

Comments:

There is no doubt that that there are some inherent problems with law enforcement and police officers. Most of these problems can primarily be attributed to good quality training, the lack of qualified men and women, and leadership.

The other problem that JCF has which they editorial failed to discuss or mention is the increased bad public relations since the Braeton shootings. Adding to this bad PR is the destructive criticism from Mr. Seaga.

Talk Back comments on ‘No retreat, no surrender’

Posted by:

Progress4Jamaica

Posted on:

Wednesday, July 10, 2002 at 6:11:12 AM 

Location:

NY, USA 

Occupation:

None 

Comments:

I am still amazed that the Leader of the Opposition, the Hon. Edward Seaga has not made a public statement to condemn the cold-blooded murders of the police officers. Mr. Seaga more than any other leader in Jamaica needs to do this for two reasons:

1) He is a political leader of the Opposition Party.

2) He is seeking to become the next PM.

3) He has been very antagonistic to towards the police.

For the police to regain their respect and support of the public, they will have to get full support from political leaders and other high visibility leaders in other areas. Law enforcenment is the foundation of a democratic society and if this foundation is weakened the country runs the risk of anarchy and possible civil war.

Talk Back comments on ‘Memorial unveiled for 27 who died in West Kingston violence’

Posted by:

Progress4Jamaica

Posted on:

Thursday, July 11, 2002 at 11:17:43 AM 

Location:

NY, USA 

Occupation:

None 

Comments:

Why doesn’t Mr. Seaga propose that a monument be erected for the police officers who were struck down in cold-blood. They are the ones who deserve a monument. I tell you this from the heart, we have political leaders today in Jamaica who don’t give a rat’s ass about Jamaicans. All they care about is there selfish egotistical self. But I teel you, there is a Higher Authority to whom they will ahve to answer to. And they will suffer on this earth before they face the judgement of this Higher Authority.

Talk Back comments on ‘Memorial unveiled for 27 who died in West Kingston violence’

Posted by:

Progress4Jamaica

Posted on:

Thursday, July 11, 2002 at 11:23:10 AM 

Location:

NY, USA 

Occupation:

None 

Comments:

..and who is going to take care of the widows and and children of the police oficers killed by cold-blooded murders? Has Mr. Seaga said anything about that? Is he doing anything about that? Is the government doing anything?

Wake up Jamaicans…it is time to start putting tghe heat on these political leaders rather than treating them like Gods.

Talk Back comments on ‘Memorial unveiled for 27 who died in West Kingston violence’

Posted by:

Progress4Jamaica

Posted on:

Thursday, July 11, 2002 at 6:22:38 AM 

Location:

NY, USA 

Occupation:

None 

Comments:

This is another good example of how Jamaica is so messed up. Now you tell me in which other civilize country a memorial would be erected to honor people who died from a confrontation with law enforcement. These people,were not fighting for justice or freedom (virtues that justify honor) they were fighting to protect theitr criminal lifestyle and and the idea that the police has no right to enter their domain – an idea planted by their puppet master).

Where is the public outrage in Jamaica over the crazy and insane things that have been going on. Ten police officers have been murdered in cold blood since the begining of the year and Jamaicans remain as passive as can be.

How can Jamaicans expect their political leaders to perform and correct problems when they go about their business like zombies. Jamaicans need to wake up and start sending a strong message to the political leaders (PNP and JLP alike) that they have to do more and together for the benefit of the country. This partician tribal politics is unacceptable. Building a monument to honor criminals is stupid and a waste of money. That money could have been used to do better things like improve schools or public health facilities in the comunity. Shame on the people who sponsored and financed this monument for the sole purpose of perpetuating political divisions.

Jamaica does not need politicians who support thsi kind of nonsense.Jamaica does not need politicians who glorify criminals and who will promote monuments to honor them. If better do not wake up out of their zombie like state before it’s too late.

Talk Back comments on ‘Memorial unveiled for 27 who died in West Kingston violence’

Posted by:

Haamzous_XI

Posted on:

Thursday, July 11, 2002 at 9:36:37 AM 

Location:

Spanish Town, Jamaica 

Occupation:

Technical Specialist 

Comments:

Progress4Jamaica, well said.

Politicians are heartless. seaga could have prevented this carnage only if he had called off his bad dawgs. Now after he sentenced the poor ppl of his constituents to death he is using it as a political stepping-stone, continuing to warp the minds of the ‘illiterate’ incapable of thinking for themselves (such as Wilfred Gray, dhf qc n others).

Justice would have been better served by testifying at the inquiry rather than erecting monuments w/ the names of those he n his goons caused to be slain. But then again ppl w/ minds of their own know y he refused to give evidence. Have a good day.

Talk Back comments on ‘Seaga just ahead as leader with best grasp of problems’

Posted by:

Progress4Jamaica

Posted on:

Sunday, July 14, 2002 at 6:58:07 AM 

Location:

NY, USA 

Occupation:

None 

Comments:

I am not sure of the value of this poll as it provides no useful feedback to anyone except maybe political lackeys who like historical references. Considering the myriad of problems bedeviling the country, it would be more beneficial to do polls that deal with these problems.

If Jamaicans need a poll to tell them that the current political leaders don’t have a grasp on how to solve the problem then they do not understand the political

situation in Jamaica. I have said repeatedly that most of Jamaica’s problems can be traced to a political culture that is corrupt, without effective leadership, and very divisive.. Our political leaders have failed to inspire the Jamaican people and have shown very little initiative in wanting to tackle thee difficult problems affecting the country.

So which political leader can do more for Jamaica in the next 5 years? I would say that it would take a miracle for the any of the current two leaders to restore some semblance of peace and economic prosperity to Jamaica. Although I do believe that if Mr. Seaga becomes the next PM, the US will most likely provide more aid to the country (well he is their man). . Make no mistake though this is no going to solve the social problems.

To compare the two political leaders, I think Mr. Seaga is very bad for Jamaica for the following reasons:

1) He is the MP for a constituency that is armed to the teeth . These armed people are basically criminals who have no positive contribution to make to their constituency or to Jamaica.

2) His name is always associated with political violence simple because this violence originates out of his constituency.

3) He does not have any respect for law enforcement based on his several negative criticisms that have contributed to public anti-sentiment towards the police..

4) He does not have any respect for public institutions such as the Jamaica Constabulary Force, the Judiciary (he thumbed his nose at the Commission of Inquiry), and the Internal Revenue process (he has failed to pay his taxes).

5) He creates unnecessary political confrontation and division amongst the Jamaican people and contributes to the crude behavior of Jamaicans ( e.g. Referring to the PM as a Chi Chi man and making other pronouncements to appeal to a certain class of Jamaicans).

I could go on and list many more negatives to Mr. Seaga. But based on these 5 things, Mr. Seaga is clearly not fit to lead any country. If Jamaicans open the door and let him become the next PM it will be very bad news for Jamaica.

And what about Mr. Patterson? Well I believe he has better character and integrity than Mr. Seaga. For one thing you cannot ascribe any of the 5 things to him that I have ascribed to Mr. Seaga. The big rap against him is that he is weak leader. His personality does not reflect the no-nonsense leadership style that is required to govern an out of control people.

I would rather prefer to re-install Mr. Patterson as PM though. In doing so we would have to find way of putting fire to his tail to get him to do what is right. Or we would have to pressure him to turn the reins over to someone else.

To conclude this, if Jamaica is to bounce back, Jamaicans will have to wake-up and demand more from their politicians. Sitting back and let them do whatever they please to do should not be an option. This is the only way to make politicians accountable for their actions.

Talk Back comments on ‘Seaga just ahead as leader with best grasp of problems’

Posted by:

do

Posted on:

Sunday, July 14, 2002 at 7:23:39 AM 

Location:

New York., USA. 

Occupation:

 

Comments:

Progress4jamaica.

Your post says it all.
Edward Seaga is no good for JAMAICA at this time.
May the powers that be save Jamaica and its people from such a fate.

Talk Back comments on ‘Seaga just ahead as leader with best grasp of problems’

Posted by:

Posted on:

Sunday, July 14, 2002 at 7:47:23 AM 

Location:

Newark, Usa 

Occupation:

Scientist 

Comments:

pFJA. COMMENT ARE POLITICALLY BIASED AND NOT TRUTHFUL….to say a whol constituency is criminals is hitting below the belt…how could not see, East KGN, Central KGN, Portia constuency, Davies constitueny and talk about guns..they all have gunmen connection and possible West KGN is arm because of necessity too!!! The arming of these constitents have done nothing good for Jamaica!!!
TG, Arnetts, etc are very progresives communities in Jamaica independent of the political divide…tg..have national league soccer team..beaten finalist dis year…National basketball champs, volleyball champs,

senior cup cricket team, de best at marching bands and rivalism,…like arnetts, dunkirk etc..they are progressive comunities that have some bad elements, which makes the news more than the mostly good people who resides in these politically affiliated communites!!! HALF-TRUTH ARE BASICALLY LIES!!!!WE CANNOT MAKE A BETTA JAMAICA BY REFUSING TO IDENTIFY THAT THE PROBLEM MENTIONED FOR WEST KGN…IS INDEED A GENERALISED PROBLEM FOR ALL GARRISONS….PNP AND JLP…THEN WE CAN MAKE A POSITIVE CHANGE!!!FOR THE BETTERMENT OF JAMAICA, PUTTING JAMAICA FIRST!!! BY ONE NESS AND FRANKNESS!!!ONE PROGRESS AS A PEOPLE!!FREEDOM!!!

Talk Back comments on ‘Seaga just ahead as leader with best grasp of problems’

Posted by:

Progress4Jamaica

Posted on:

Sunday, July 14, 2002 at 8:09:57 AM 

Location:

NY, USA 

Occupation:

None 

Comments:

Saracen Blade, I have been saying exactly what you said in your Post 11 ever since I began posting comments on here about two year ago. Like yourself i‘m neither PNP or JLP and have stated this unequivocally. However, my frequent criticism of Mr. Seaga could lead the the less perceptive individual to think that I am for the PNP.

I am 100% for Jamaica and will support any political party that demonstrates policies for the progress of Jamaica. Notice my alias, it doesn not say Progress for the PNP or Progress for the JLP but PROGRESS FOR JAMAICA. I would like to go back to Jamaica and live but definitely would not want to go back under the current political culture.

I am not optomistic that things are going to change in

Jamaica though and the thought of Mr. Seaga getting control of the reins is scary. LOOK THIS MAN HAS BEEN MP OF TIVOLI GARDEN CONSTITUENCY FOR OVER 40 YEARS AND THE ONLY THING THAT TG IS NOTED FOR IS POLITICAL VIOLENCE AND CRIME. Is this progress. Mr. Seaga has not done anything positive for TG in 40 years , then how is he going to anything for Jamaica.

I have repeatedly said on theis forum that Mr. Seaga must condemn the cold-blodded Murder of police officers but he has failed to do so to date. A move like this even if he is not sincere about it would benefit Jamaica. Personally, I think it’s time for Mr. Seaga to get the hell out of politics, he has done mor damage than good fpr the country. He will be remember for his legacy of political violence and mayhem from the guns flooded into Jamaica to support his agenda. It’s time for a new JLP leader, someone who will put Jamaica first, someone who will be bold enough to end the culture of political tribalism that Mr. Seaga has nutured over the years.

I repeat has I have done before:
JAMAICANS, ASK NOT WAHT THE PNP OR THE JLP CAN DO FOR YOU ASK WHAT YOU CAN DO FOR JAMAICA.

Talk Back comments on ‘Seaga just ahead as leader with best grasp of problems’

Posted by:

Progress4Jamaica

Posted on:

Sunday, July 14, 2002 at 8:27:11 AM 

Location:

NY, USA 

Occupation:

None 

Comments:

Commentary, your views appear to be sincere and I respect them even though I don’t agree with some aspects of your views. Unfortunately, writing on this forum ad-lib does not help in allowing one to elaborate and provide more specific instead of

generalized comments. I also, find that this medium is not conducive for debating (you can exchange written comments but I don’t care for that so much). I rather debate someone in person.

I do believe though that Mr. Patterson has more integrity and character than Mr. Seaga. When Mr. patterson is exposed for any flaws that count against his integrity or character, then I will correct my view point. Both men are like day and night (no pun intended in reference to color).